Cover image for Herman Melville, Moby-Dick
Title:
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick
Author:
Selby, Nick.
Publication Information:
New York : Columbia University Press, [1999]

©1998
Physical Description:
180 pages ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction -- Early reviews -- The 'Melville revival' -- The 1940s : Moby Dick and the 'American Renaissance' -- The 1950s : 'myth criticism' and the growth of American studies -- Formalist approaches, humanist readings -- Cultural materialism and 'reconstructive' readings -- Deconstructive reading, 'post-humanist' critiques and 'new Americanists'.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780231115384

9780231115391
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS2384.M62 H47 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Central Library PS2384.M62 H47 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The huge range of critical and academic debate about this monster of a novel confirms Moby-Dick's status as a vital and exhilarating exploration of the role of American ideology in defining modern consciousness. This Columbia Critical Guide starts with extracts from Melville's own letters and essays and from early reviews of Moby-Dick that set the terms for later critical evaluations. Subsequent chapters deal with the "Melville Revival" of the 1920s and the novel's central place in the establishment, growth, and reassessment of American Studies in the 1940s and 1950s. The final chapters examine postmodern New Americanist readings of the text, and how these provide new models for thinking about American culture.


Author Notes

Nick Selby teaches at the University of Wales, Swansea.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 7
Chapter 1 Early Reviewsp. 17
Chapter 2 The 'Melville Revival'p. 33
Chapter 3 The 1940s: Moby-Dick and the 'American Renaissance'p. 51
Chapter 4 The 1950s: 'Myth Criticism' and the Growth of American Studiesp. 76
Chapter 5 Formalist Approaches, Humanist Readingsp. 94
Chapter 6 Cultural Materialism and 'Reconstructive' Readingsp. 115
Chapter 7 Deconstructive Reading, 'Post-humanist' Critiques and 'New Americanists'p. 146
Bibliographyp. 166

Google Preview