Cover image for Farmer Brown goes round and round
Title:
Farmer Brown goes round and round
Author:
Sloat, Teri.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : DK Pub., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
A twister strikes Farmer Brown's farm and mixes the animals all up, so that the cows oinked, sheep clucked, hens brayed, and his hound neighed.
General Note:
"A DK Ink book."

"A Melanie Kroupa book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 29939.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 21966 Guided reading level: K.
ISBN:
9780789425126
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Feuer has fine-tuned our understanding of the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection by unearthing and publishing for the first time an illuminating combat diary. . . . Serious students of American military history will appreciate the opportunity to compare nearly a century of changing interpretations with a most valuable primary source. The editor of the Bilibid Diary , Feuer has once again rendered conspicious service to the historical profession.

Barry F. Machado Professor of History Washington and Lee University

The story of the Old Army as revealed through the eyes of Colonel Jacob Kreps, this book dramatically portrays life in action with the U.S. Infantry on the Western frontier, in the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippine Insurrection. Drawing on the first hand accounts preserved in the diary of Kreps, who served for more than 30 years with the U.S. Twenty-second Infantry Regiment, A. B. Feuer details the hardships endured by the soldiers in combat action.

Feuer recounts the experiences of the distinguished U.S. Twenty-second Infantry Regiment beginning in 1883. He also discusses numerous other U.S. Army units--infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineering, medical, quartermaster and signal--and offers important data on the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps. Some of the accounts, such as that of the Pasig River battle and the Mindanao campaign, fill in missing chapters in the chronicles of war history. This book, which includes original maps and photographs, is valuable to anyone interested in military history.


Author Notes

Teri Sloat grew up in Salem, in the Willamette Valley where berry crops are grown. As a child, as soon as school was out for the summer, Sloat went to work in the fields. Her and her friends picked berries from 5am until 4pm.

Sloat had planned on teaching art in high school. She met her husband in college and before they began teaching high school, they were given a chance to move to rural Alaska and teach elementary school in a small Yup'ik village at the mouth of the Yukon River. They lived and taught for 12 years on the Kuskokwim and Yukon Rivers in Yup'ik villages.

Sloat has been publishing books for children since 1989.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 6^-8. Farmer Brown isn't the only one going "round and round" when a twister drops him and his livestock in a heap; suddenly, the cows are oinking, the sheep clucking, the goat is meowing, and Brown himself is crowing like a rooster. Worse yet, the rooster starts issuing bossy instructions: "Get the shirt the donkey's chewing; / Give birdseed to the cat--he's cooing. / Take the baaing doves to pasture--/ Feed the hound his oats! Work faster!" Luckily, along comes another twister to set things right--more or less. As in The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown (1995), Westcott's sunny, frantic cartoons and Sloat's bouncy verse work together hand in glove to crank up the comedy. A knee-slapping alternative to Charles Causely's " Quack!" Said the Billy Goat (1986). --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

Sloat and Westcott, who teamed up for The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown, offer tongue-twisting rhyme and two Farmer Brown-twisting tornadoes. As Farmer Brown completes his chores, a powerful wind sweeps him up along with all his animals. "While clouds of sheep swirled through the air,/ The clothesline chased the goat and mare/ Until each one had on a pair/ Of Farmer Brown's plaid underwear!" When the crowd crash-lands back in the barnyard, Farmer Brown discovers that something is amiss: "His cows oinked,/ The pigs moo'd,/ His sheep clucked,/ The cat coo'd." In the ensuing mayhem, sheep try to lay eggs, cows wallow in the mud and Farmer Brown crows "Cock-a-doodle-doo!" It takes the return of the twister to restore the group's proper personalities and behaviors. Sloat spins entertaining verse, and a silly mood prevails. Westcott composes cartoon voice bubbles that divulge a confused dog's "neigh" and a goat's "meow." Instead of illustrations that show the threatening storm, the whole cast suddenly appears in midair, wrapped in a swirl of white. The tornado theme may not be hilarious for Midwesterners, but if readers can handle The Wizard of Oz, this should be (ahem) a breeze. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-In this companion book to The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown (Orchard, 1995), a twister blows in and whirls the barnyard inhabitants, including Farmer Brown, up and down and all around. Although everyone lands safely, things are not the same: the "cows oinked,/The pigs moo'd," Farmer Brown is cock-a-doodle-dooing, and the rooster is running the farm. In time, another twister blows in, returning the barnyard to its previous state. The humor, text, and visual presentation are sharper and more effective than in the first book. Bright cartoon illustrations and bouncy rhymed narration punch up the silly story. Images of pigs being milked and animals in plaid and polka-dot underwear are sure to tickle young readers. This rhythmic narration will make for a lively read-aloud. Pair it with Bernard Most's Cock-a-Doodle-Moo! (Harcourt, 1996) and score a 10 on the storytime giggle meter.-Heide Piehler, Shorewood Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.