Cover image for A friend like Ed
Title:
A friend like Ed
Author:
Wagner, Karen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker and Co., [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 21 x 26 cm
Summary:
Mildred accepts her best friend Ed even though he is sometimes eccentric.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC K-2 2.5 2 Quiz: 15049 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780802786623

9780802786630
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This first full-length scholarly study of comic books as a narrative form attempts to explain why comic books, traditionally considered to be juvenile trash literature, have in the 1980s been used by serious artists to tell realistic stories for adults


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. Rodents Mildred and Ed are opposites: Mildred is demure, and Ed is boisterous. But they are friends nonetheless, until Ed becomes overly enthusiastic about poetry class and embarrasses Mildred by reciting in the supermarket. Mildred decides, then and there, that she needs a less flamboyant buddy. She finds Pearl, only to realize that her new friend is prissy, bossy, and not nearly as much fun as her old pal. It isn't long before Mildred and Ed have a sweet reconciliation, which comes with the understanding that despite their differences, they bring out the best in each other. The text is a bit disjointed at times, but poetry lovers will revel in the spirited rhymes Ed spouts, and everyone will warm to Pedersen's charming pictures. --Kathleen Squires


Publisher's Weekly Review

This agreeable but predictable story counsels that true friendship is rare and that readers should accept their pals' idiosyncrasies. Prim brown mouse Mildred is a close companion of nerdy brown mouse Ed, whose too-short pants and round glasses make him an Erckel among rodents. Ed's button collection seems weird to Mildred, but "no one could hold a candle to Ed's homemade, fudge-frosted, triple-layer cake. Or make Mildred laugh so hard her eyes would water." Unfortunately, a rift develops when Ed takes up poetry. He rhymes at all timesÄat the dentist, at the library, at the supermarketÄand the embarrassed Mildred seeks out a new best friend in a self-absorbed ice-skater. Wagner (Silly Fred) and Pedersen (A Weed Is a Seed) stick to convention in the text and watercolors. Wagner shows how badly Mildred and Ed miss one another when they're apart, and Pedersen draws the duo as gawky, bipedal mice who look like skinny humans but for their egg-shaped heads, donutlike ears and simian tails. Ed's nice, but utterly unsurprising. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-A pleasant friendship tale. When Ed starts reciting poems in odd places, including the library and the supermarket, Mildred's embarrassment leads her to seek a new playmate. She finds one in Pearl, a self-centered ice-skating expert. As winter passes, Ed continues his usual activities, which include cake baking and button sorting, but he longs to have his old friend back. Meanwhile, Mildred is getting fed up with Pearl's antics and decides to make up with Ed. She discovers him awkwardly writing her name with ice skates and realizes he still wants to be friends. In return, she gives him a pen, the perfect gift for a poet. These mice don't quite match the charm of Kevin Henkes's creations, but the lively watercolor illustrations convey quite a bit of personality. Ed's long limbs and goofy glasses make him seem properly mouselike and boyish at the same time, and Mildred's changing emotions show in the subtle expressions in her eyes and mouth. Though the plot is nothing unusual, it works well, with the message of accepting eccentricities coming through gently and effectively. The pair's reconciliation is convincing. Mildred never actually shows that she can handle Ed's outbursts in public, but it's clear enough that the mouse has learned her lesson and will stick with her friend no matter how strangely he acts.-Steven Engelfried, West Linn Public Library, OR (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.