Cover image for Mike Leigh : interviews
Title:
Mike Leigh : interviews
Author:
Leigh, Mike, 1943-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xxii, 138 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781578060672

9781578060689
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PN1998.3.L445 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

British filmmaker Mike Leigh began his career in the 1970s as a playwright and theater director. Later he made a number of films of varying lengths for British television and then moved into feature film production. Although well established in the U. K., he slowly gained a reputation in the United States, where, at first, his work was known to a relatively small number of filmgoers and critics. Such major films as High Hopes and Life Is Sweet attracted little attention in America. With the release of Secrets and Lies, however, the audience for Leigh's films increased dramatically.

Mike Leigh: Interviews collects published conversations from the past seven years. Not just a close-up encounter with Leigh, they also express both his unusual work style and the emotional and intellectual toughness that characterizes his distinct approach to filmmaking.

As Leigh speaks in these interviews, he reveals what is unique in his work, particularly that his films do not begin with a script. Explaining this approach, he discusses how he begins by assembling a few actors who talk, improvise, create characters, and gradually develop a story that contains their actions. Before the camera rolls, a tentative script is set, but many months may pass before the script is finished and the shooting begins.

Among those he talks with in these interviews are Jay Carr of the Boston Globe, Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times, and Judy Stone, the longtime critic of the San Francisco Chronicle. Leigh is asked to discuss politics, social attitudes, and religion--all of which give his films a unique signature. Howie Movshovitz is the director of FilmCenter Denver in the College of Arts and Media at the University of Colorado. He also is a film critic for Colorado Public Radio and a contributor to Playboy.com and "Morning Edition" on NPR.