Cover image for Extraordinary friends
Title:
Extraordinary friends
Author:
Rogers, Fred.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : G. P. Putnam, 2000.
Physical Description:
unpaged. ; color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Focuses on people who are different, who might use equipment such as wheelchairs or special computers, who are more like you than you might think, and suggests ways to interact with them.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 470 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 1 Quiz: 31237 Guided reading level: K.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399231469

9780399231476
Format :
Book

Available:*

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HV888 .R63 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

How do you get to know someone in a wheelchair? Is it okay to ask questions when you see someone who is different from you?Written for the child without special needs--the child with the questions--this book opens up a difficult subject to discussion. Fred Rogers challenges the stereotypes that often plague children with special needs and celebrates six children who are extraordinary friends. Share this book with all children--to spark communication, to attack the stigma, to bridge the gap between children with different abilities. Mister Rogers is the perfect person to write a book like this, with respect and the same gentleness that has characterized his television show for decades.


Author Notes

Fred McFeely Rogers was born on March 20, 1928 in Pennsylvania. He was an American television personality, educator, Presbyterian minister, composer, songwriter, author, and activist. Rogers was most famous for creating, hosting, and composing the theme music for the educational preschool television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (1968 - 2001), which featured his gentle, soft-spoken personality. Originally he was educated to be a minister but was displeased with the way television addressed children and made an effort to change this when he began to write for and perform on local Pittsburgh-area shows dedicated to youth. WQED developed his own show in 1968 and it was distributed nationwide by Eastern Educational Television Network. Over the course of three decades on television, Fred Rogers became an indelible American icon of children's entertainment and education, as well as a symbol of compassion, patience, and morality.

Rogers received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, some forty honorary degrees, and a Peabody Award. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame, was recognized by two Congressional resolutions, and was ranked No. 35 among TV Guide's Fifty Greatest TV Stars of All Time.[5] Several buildings and artworks in Pennsylvania are dedicated to his memory, and the Smithsonian Institution displays one of his trademark sweaters as a "Treasure of American History".

Rogers was diagnosed with stomach cancer in December 2002, not long after his retirement. He underwent surgery on January 6, 2003, which was unsuccessful. Rogers died on the morning of February 27, 2003, at his home with his wife by his side, less than a month before he would have turned 75.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-9. The latest in the Let's Talk about It series takes an honest, clear look at an issue that children often find intimidating and scary--disabilities. Children who use wheelchairs, communicate via computer screens, and have less-visible disabilities go about their daily routines with other children in brightly lit, color-saturated photographs. The well-known Rogers states simply that all people want to love and be loved and that people are alike even if they don't "walk or talk or learn the same way you do." He encourages children to ask questions and to start a conversation the way you would with anyone, by saying "Hi" and giving your name. He reminds children that sometimes people may not want help, so you should ask first, and that friends can tell each other even hard things, like "I don't like when you do that." Disabled adults figure in the pictures, too, including a storytime librarian who uses a wheelchair. Recommended for all collections. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Rogers deals with the concerns, questions, and confusion children may have about people with special needs. He begins by describing common feelings they experience when they meet someone with a disability, such as curiosity, fear, or surprise. Readers are reassured that these reactions are normal and that getting to know individuals is the best way to understand and appreciate them. Although the author repeats some of the same advice found in his Adoption (1995), Divorce (1996) and Stepfamilies (1997, all Putnam)-for example, how helpful it is for children to talk to grown-ups about their feelings-this book also offers gentle suggestions for becoming friends with "extraordinary" people. Bright, colorful photographs depict six children with special needs in various situations. The first page introduces them and some of the things they like. Although the large-print text is easy to read, the book is best shared aloud as discussion is bound to follow.-Christine Lindsey, Lake Superior Primary School, Ashland, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.