Cover image for Slavery
Title:
Slavery
Author:
Currie, Stephen, 1960-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
111 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Offers opposing viewpoints regarding the issue of slavery in the United States, discussing its historical, social, and economic aspects.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781565108806

9781565108813
Format :
Book

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E449 .C975 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

It finds those costs insupportable. At a time when prevailing liberal wisdom argues for the downplaying of race in the hope of building coalitions dedicated to economic reform, Roediger wants to open, not close, debates on the privileges and miseries associated with being white. He closely examines the way in which white identities have historically prepared white Americans to accept the oppression of others, the emptiness of their own lives, and the impossibility of change.

Whether discussing popular culture, race and ethnicity, the evolution of such American keywords as gook, boss and redneck, the strikes of 1877 or the election of 1992, Roediger pushes at the boundaries between labor history and politics, as well as those between race and class. Alive to tension within what James Baldwin called Sthe lie of whiteness, Roediger explores the record of dissent from white identity, especially in the cultural realm, and encourages the search for effective political challenges to whiteness.


Summary

It finds those costs insupportable. At a time when prevailing liberal wisdom argues for the downplaying of race in the hope of building coalitions dedicated to economic reform, Roediger wants to open, not close, debates on the privileges and miseries associated with being white. He closely examines the way in which white identities have historically prepared white Americans to accept the oppression of others, the emptiness of their own lives, and the impossibility of change.

Whether discussing popular culture, race and ethnicity, the evolution of such American keywords as gook, boss and redneck, the strikes of 1877 or the election of 1992, Roediger pushes at the boundaries between labor history and politics, as well as those between race and class. Alive to tension within what James Baldwin called Sthe lie of whiteness, Roediger explores the record of dissent from white identity, especially in the cultural realm, and encourages the search for effective political challenges to whiteness.