Cover image for The Third World : opposing viewpoints
Title:
The Third World : opposing viewpoints
Author:
Egendorf, Laura K., 1973-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
221 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780737703542

9780737703535
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
D883 .T44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
D883 .T44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
Searching...
Searching...
D883 .T44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The critical issues and problems of the Third World are evaluated in this anthology. The future of Third World nations is also examined. Chapters include: What Are the Problems Facing Third World Countries? How Can Third World Development Be Achieved? Can Third World Nations Form Lasting Democracies? What is the First World's Role in the Third World?


Summary

The critical issues and problems of the Third World are evaluated in this anthology. The future of Third World nations is also examined. Chapters include: What Are the Problems Facing Third World Countries? How Can Third World Development Be Achieved? Can Third World Nations Form Lasting Democracies? What is the First World's Role in the Third World?


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. This volume in the exceptional Opposing Viewpoints series addresses "whether the quality of life in developing countries needs to improve and, if so, how can that improvement be achieved." Following the series' familiar format, selections are grouped into concise chapters that offer background on the issues and introductions to current debates--the best approach to development; whether developing nations can form lasting democracies; and what role the First World should play. The selections, focused on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and culled from both lesser-known and established international publications, are sophisticated, so students with some academic exposure to economics and emerging governments will have a great advantage. But each entry is made more accessible by an introduction and questions that offer some information on the author's perspective. Young people following global events will benefit from this balanced, well-edited anthology of current opinions. Questions for further discussion, a list of organizations to contact, and a bibliography are appended. --Gillian Engberg


School Library Journal Review

Gr 11 Up-This collection of cogent essays provides an excellent summary of the myriad, complex problems facing the Third World. Since the civil strife, famine, medical calamities, etc. that these nations face affect the stability of the global community, the debate over how to solve their problems is a heated and important one. The topics included are overpopulation, women's sexual rights, poverty, the AIDS epidemic, free market economies, debt relief, the World Bank, American-style democracy, and unchecked elitist power. Although much of the debate centers on Africa, there are articles on Latin America and the Middle East. Despite clear writing, some students will struggle with the vocabulary and unfamiliar content of these well-chosen excerpts. Still, this is a useful volume for research.-Joanne K. Cecere, Highland High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. This volume in the exceptional Opposing Viewpoints series addresses "whether the quality of life in developing countries needs to improve and, if so, how can that improvement be achieved." Following the series' familiar format, selections are grouped into concise chapters that offer background on the issues and introductions to current debates--the best approach to development; whether developing nations can form lasting democracies; and what role the First World should play. The selections, focused on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and culled from both lesser-known and established international publications, are sophisticated, so students with some academic exposure to economics and emerging governments will have a great advantage. But each entry is made more accessible by an introduction and questions that offer some information on the author's perspective. Young people following global events will benefit from this balanced, well-edited anthology of current opinions. Questions for further discussion, a list of organizations to contact, and a bibliography are appended. --Gillian Engberg


School Library Journal Review

Gr 11 Up-This collection of cogent essays provides an excellent summary of the myriad, complex problems facing the Third World. Since the civil strife, famine, medical calamities, etc. that these nations face affect the stability of the global community, the debate over how to solve their problems is a heated and important one. The topics included are overpopulation, women's sexual rights, poverty, the AIDS epidemic, free market economies, debt relief, the World Bank, American-style democracy, and unchecked elitist power. Although much of the debate centers on Africa, there are articles on Latin America and the Middle East. Despite clear writing, some students will struggle with the vocabulary and unfamiliar content of these well-chosen excerpts. Still, this is a useful volume for research.-Joanne K. Cecere, Highland High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Roy W. BrownPeter T. BauerFrederick Regnery and Walter BlockDavid Nicholson-LordDeborah L. BillingsHelen SearlsKeith B. RichburgCharles L. GeshekterTim CarringtonFred GabouryRoger MahonyMartin Vander WeyerBryan T. JohnsonJames L. TysonAmii Omara-OtunnuThomas J. D'AgostinoPaulo Sergio PinheiroJ. Brian AtwoodL. Jacobo RodriguezIleana Ros-LehtinenGeorge B.N. AyitteyJames Gustave SpethPeter BeinartRoy W. BrownPeter T. BauerFrederick Regnery and Walter BlockDavid Nicholson-LordDeborah L. BillingsHelen SearlsKeith B. RichburgCharles L. GeshekterTim CarringtonFred GabouryRoger MahonyMartin Vander WeyerBryan T. JohnsonJames L. TysonAmii Omara-OtunnuThomas J. D'AgostinoPaulo Sergio PinheiroJ. Brian AtwoodL. Jacobo RodriguezIleana Ros-LehtinenGeorge B.N. AyitteyJames Gustave SpethPeter Beinart
Why Consider Opposing Viewpoints?p. 9
Introductionp. 12
Chapter 1 What Are the Problems Facing Third World Countries?
Chapter Prefacep. 17
1. Overpopulation Causes Economic Problemsp. 19
2. Overpopulation Does Not Cause Economic Problemsp. 24
3. Restrictions on Production and Consumption Harm the Third Worldp. 30
4. Western Levels of Production and Consumption Would Harm the Third Worldp. 36
5. Women in the Third World Lack Sexual Freedomp. 42
6. Poverty Is a Greater Concern Than Sexual Freedom to Women in the Third Worldp. 50
7. AIDS Is Epidemic in Africap. 56
8. The African AIDS Epidemic Is Misrepresentedp. 64
Periodical Bibliographyp. 71
Chapter 2 How Can Third World Development Be Achieved?
Chapter Prefacep. 73
1. Free-Market Policies Spur Third World Developmentp. 75
2. Free-Market Policies Hinder Third World Developmentp. 83
3. Debt Relief or Cancellation Will Aid Third World Developmentp. 91
4. Debt Cancellation Will Not Aid Third World Developmentp. 100
5. The World Bank Provides Effective Development Programsp. 107
6. The World Bank Does Not Provide Effective Development Programsp. 116
Periodical Bibliographyp. 123
Chapter 3 Can Third World Nations Form Lasting Democracies?
Chapter Prefacep. 125
1. Imposing American-Style Democracy on Third World Nations May Be Harmfulp. 126
2. Democracy Can Succeed in Africap. 134
3. Problems Persist in African Democraciesp. 139
4. Latin American Countries Need to Overcome Their Non-Democratic Pastp. 143
5. Unchecked Power Threatens Latin American Democraciesp. 151
Periodical Bibliographyp. 158
Chapter 4 What Is the First World's Role in the Third World?
Chapter Prefacep. 160
1. U.S. Foreign Aid Benefits the Third Worldp. 161
2. U.S. Foreign Aid Does Not Benefit the Third Worldp. 170
3. The United States Should Take a More Active Role in Africap. 179
4. U.S. Involvement in Africa Is Imperialistp. 184
5. Africa Does Not Need Western Assistancep. 190
6. The United Nations Plays a Central Role in Third World Developmentp. 196
7. Humanitarian Efforts by the United Nations Are Ineffectivep. 201
Periodical Bibliographyp. 207
For Further Discussionp. 208
Organizations to Contactp. 210
Bibliography of Booksp. 214
Indexp. 217
Why Consider Opposing Viewpoints?p. 9
Introductionp. 12
Chapter 1 What Are the Problems Facing Third World Countries?
Chapter Prefacep. 17
1. Overpopulation Causes Economic Problemsp. 19
2. Overpopulation Does Not Cause Economic Problemsp. 24
3. Restrictions on Production and Consumption Harm the Third Worldp. 30
4. Western Levels of Production and Consumption Would Harm the Third Worldp. 36
5. Women in the Third World Lack Sexual Freedomp. 42
6. Poverty Is a Greater Concern Than Sexual Freedom to Women in the Third Worldp. 50
7. AIDS Is Epidemic in Africap. 56
8. The African AIDS Epidemic Is Misrepresentedp. 64
Periodical Bibliographyp. 71
Chapter 2 How Can Third World Development Be Achieved?
Chapter Prefacep. 73
1. Free-Market Policies Spur Third World Developmentp. 75
2. Free-Market Policies Hinder Third World Developmentp. 83
3. Debt Relief or Cancellation Will Aid Third World Developmentp. 91
4. Debt Cancellation Will Not Aid Third World Developmentp. 100
5. The World Bank Provides Effective Development Programsp. 107
6. The World Bank Does Not Provide Effective Development Programsp. 116
Periodical Bibliographyp. 123
Chapter 3 Can Third World Nations Form Lasting Democracies?
Chapter Prefacep. 125
1. Imposing American-Style Democracy on Third World Nations May Be Harmfulp. 126
2. Democracy Can Succeed in Africap. 134
3. Problems Persist in African Democraciesp. 139
4. Latin American Countries Need to Overcome Their Non-Democratic Pastp. 143
5. Unchecked Power Threatens Latin American Democraciesp. 151
Periodical Bibliographyp. 158
Chapter 4 What Is the First World's Role in the Third World?
Chapter Prefacep. 160
1. U.S. Foreign Aid Benefits the Third Worldp. 161
2. U.S. Foreign Aid Does Not Benefit the Third Worldp. 170
3. The United States Should Take a More Active Role in Africap. 179
4. U.S. Involvement in Africa Is Imperialistp. 184
5. Africa Does Not Need Western Assistancep. 190
6. The United Nations Plays a Central Role in Third World Developmentp. 196
7. Humanitarian Efforts by the United Nations Are Ineffectivep. 201
Periodical Bibliographyp. 207
For Further Discussionp. 208
Organizations to Contactp. 210
Bibliography of Booksp. 214
Indexp. 217