Cover image for Poverty : opposing viewpoints
Title:
Poverty : opposing viewpoints
Author:
Egendorf, Laura K., 1973-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
224 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Is poverty a serious problem? -- What are the causes of poverty? -- Can people work their way out of poverty? -- How can poor people be helped?
ISBN:
9781565109476

9781565109469
Format :
Book

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Reviews 2

Choice Review

The "Opposing Viewpoints Series" compiles newspaper and magazine articles in which experts with differing opinions and perspectives take their case to the American public. This volume on poverty covers four questions: whether poverty is a serious problem; what causes poverty; whether employment can provide a solution to poverty; and how poor people can be helped. Each article is preceded by a short introduction and a set of questions to ponder when reading the article. Although the editors have generally done a good job selecting articles for this volume, several omissions need to be noted. First, there is nothing on the earned income tax credit as a way to help working people escape poverty. Second, there is nothing about how replacing welfare (AFDC) with temporary assistance will affect poverty in the US. This volume is more appropriate for lower-division undergraduate classroom use than for college library collections. S. Pressman Monmouth University (NJ)


Choice Review

The "Opposing Viewpoints Series" compiles newspaper and magazine articles in which experts with differing opinions and perspectives take their case to the American public. This volume on poverty covers four questions: whether poverty is a serious problem; what causes poverty; whether employment can provide a solution to poverty; and how poor people can be helped. Each article is preceded by a short introduction and a set of questions to ponder when reading the article. Although the editors have generally done a good job selecting articles for this volume, several omissions need to be noted. First, there is nothing on the earned income tax credit as a way to help working people escape poverty. Second, there is nothing about how replacing welfare (AFDC) with temporary assistance will affect poverty in the US. This volume is more appropriate for lower-division undergraduate classroom use than for college library collections. S. Pressman Monmouth University (NJ)