Cover image for American values : opposing viewpoints
Title:
American values : opposing viewpoints
Author:
Hurley, Jennifer A., 1973-
Publication Information:
San Diego : Greenhaven Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
224 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780737703436

9780737703443
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Social critics and scholars assess the state of morality in America and offer various perspectives on whether society's values should be changed. Chapter titles include: What Values Should America Uphold? Is America in Moral Decline? How Does the Media Influence American Values? What Measures Will Improve American Values?


Summary

Social critics and scholars assess the state of morality in America and offer various perspectives on whether society's values should be changed. Chapter titles include: What Values Should America Uphold? Is America in Moral Decline? How Does the Media Influence American Values? What Measures Will Improve American Values?


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. In one of its boldest efforts yet, the Opposing Viewpoints series tackles a topic whose very title seems to ignite controversy and polarize individuals. Yet by the end of this text, readers are likely to see that "values" may not be such a hot-button term after all, and that divisive opinions are often fueled by fallacious and narrow arguments. Opening the debate with Americans' seemingly inconsistent response to the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal, the book shows quite clearly that moral judgment is open to unlimited interpretation. Back-to-back essays from conservative and liberal viewpoints debate moral relativism, capitalism, religion, violence, pop culture, and even shame and character. The arguments provide no hard and fast answers, but they certainly raise thought-provoking and relevant questions. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-An examination of a wide range of complex issues confronting our culture and society. Primary-source articles explore two sides of such specific questions as whether or not public schools should provide character education, if religion is important to a moral society, and the role of the traditional family in maintaining our culture. Given the difficulty of the writing and subject matter, the questions that begin each article will be useful in helping readers to focus on essential points. However, the book is limited in that only two or three aspects of these complex questions are examined. A supplemental purchase.- William C. Schadt, Glacier Park Middle School, Maple Valley, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-12. In one of its boldest efforts yet, the Opposing Viewpoints series tackles a topic whose very title seems to ignite controversy and polarize individuals. Yet by the end of this text, readers are likely to see that "values" may not be such a hot-button term after all, and that divisive opinions are often fueled by fallacious and narrow arguments. Opening the debate with Americans' seemingly inconsistent response to the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal, the book shows quite clearly that moral judgment is open to unlimited interpretation. Back-to-back essays from conservative and liberal viewpoints debate moral relativism, capitalism, religion, violence, pop culture, and even shame and character. The arguments provide no hard and fast answers, but they certainly raise thought-provoking and relevant questions. --Roger Leslie


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-An examination of a wide range of complex issues confronting our culture and society. Primary-source articles explore two sides of such specific questions as whether or not public schools should provide character education, if religion is important to a moral society, and the role of the traditional family in maintaining our culture. Given the difficulty of the writing and subject matter, the questions that begin each article will be useful in helping readers to focus on essential points. However, the book is limited in that only two or three aspects of these complex questions are examined. A supplemental purchase.- William C. Schadt, Glacier Park Middle School, Maple Valley, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Theodore ForstmannDavid HilfikerPhilip YanceyDave MatsonJean Bethke ElshtainArlene Skolnick and Stacey RosencrantzWilliam J. BennettJames A. MoroneHerbert I. LondonTyler CowenDavid KlepperJames B. TwitchellGregg EasterbrookDanny GoldbergMarylaine BlockJohn HoodJames B. TwitchellCarl F. HorowitzDavid A. PendletonCharley ReeseSanford N. McDonnellDon FederTheodore ForstmannDavid HilfikerPhilip YanceyDave MatsonJean Bethke ElshtainArlene Skolnick and Stacey RosencrantzWilliam J. BennettJames A. MoroneHerbert I. LondonTyler CowenDavid KlepperJames B. TwitchellGregg EasterbrookDanny GoldbergMarylaine BlockJohn HoodJames B. TwitchellCarl F. HorowitzDavid A. PendletonCharley ReeseSanford N. McDonnellDon Feder
Why Consider Opposing Viewpoints?p. 8
Introductionp. 11
Chapter 1 What Values Should America Uphold?
Chapter Prefacep. 15
1. Capitalism Promotes Positive Valuesp. 16
2. Capitalism Does Not Promote Positive Valuesp. 23
3. Religion Is Essential to a Moral Societyp. 35
4. Religion Is Not Essential to a Moral Societyp. 46
5. Society's Well-Being Depends upon the Traditional Familyp. 54
6. Society's Well-Being Does Not Depend upon the Traditional Familyp. 63
Periodical Bibliographyp. 75
Chapter 2 Is America in Moral Decline?
Chapter Prefacep. 77
1. America Faces a Moral Crisisp. 78
2. America Does Not Face a Moral Crisisp. 89
3. Popular Culture Is in Declinep. 101
4. Popular Culture Is Not in Declinep. 111
5. Consumerism Pervades American Societyp. 120
6. Consumerism Can Be a Positive Forcep. 124
Periodical Bibliographyp. 130
Chapter 3 How Do the Media Influence American Values?
Chapter Prefacep. 133
1. The Media Glamorize Violencep. 134
2. The Media Are Unfairly Criticizedp. 146
3. Advertising Demeans American Valuesp. 157
4. Advertising Is Important to Consumersp. 163
Periodical Bibliographyp. 171
Chapter 4 What Measures Would Improve American Values?
Chapter Prefacep. 173
1. Shame Deters Immoral Behaviorp. 174
2. Shame Is a Form of Censorshipp. 181
3. The Government Should Legislate Moralityp. 190
4. The Government Should Not Legislate Moralityp. 195
5. Public Schools Should Provide Character Educationp. 199
6. Public Schools Should Not Provide Character Educationp. 204
Periodical Bibliographyp. 208
For Further Discussionp. 209
Organizations to Contactp. 211
Bibliography of Booksp. 216
Indexp. 219
Why Consider Opposing Viewpoints?p. 8
Introductionp. 11
Chapter 1 What Values Should America Uphold?
Chapter Prefacep. 15
1. Capitalism Promotes Positive Valuesp. 16
2. Capitalism Does Not Promote Positive Valuesp. 23
3. Religion Is Essential to a Moral Societyp. 35
4. Religion Is Not Essential to a Moral Societyp. 46
5. Society's Well-Being Depends upon the Traditional Familyp. 54
6. Society's Well-Being Does Not Depend upon the Traditional Familyp. 63
Periodical Bibliographyp. 75
Chapter 2 Is America in Moral Decline?
Chapter Prefacep. 77
1. America Faces a Moral Crisisp. 78
2. America Does Not Face a Moral Crisisp. 89
3. Popular Culture Is in Declinep. 101
4. Popular Culture Is Not in Declinep. 111
5. Consumerism Pervades American Societyp. 120
6. Consumerism Can Be a Positive Forcep. 124
Periodical Bibliographyp. 130
Chapter 3 How Do the Media Influence American Values?
Chapter Prefacep. 133
1. The Media Glamorize Violencep. 134
2. The Media Are Unfairly Criticizedp. 146
3. Advertising Demeans American Valuesp. 157
4. Advertising Is Important to Consumersp. 163
Periodical Bibliographyp. 171
Chapter 4 What Measures Would Improve American Values?
Chapter Prefacep. 173
1. Shame Deters Immoral Behaviorp. 174
2. Shame Is a Form of Censorshipp. 181
3. The Government Should Legislate Moralityp. 190
4. The Government Should Not Legislate Moralityp. 195
5. Public Schools Should Provide Character Educationp. 199
6. Public Schools Should Not Provide Character Educationp. 204
Periodical Bibliographyp. 208
For Further Discussionp. 209
Organizations to Contactp. 211
Bibliography of Booksp. 216
Indexp. 219