Cover image for Encyclopedia of Native American tribes
Title:
Encyclopedia of Native American tribes
Author:
Waldman, Carl.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Revised edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Facts on File, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xxiii, 312 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816039630

9780816039647
Format :
Book

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E76.2 .W35 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This fully updated reference explores more than 200 North American tribes, prehistoric peoples, and civilizations. Arranged alphabetically by tribe or group, this comprehensive work offers 60 new entries on tribes not covered in the previous editions. The accessible text summarizes the historical record and includes present-day tribal affairs and issues. The book also covers diet, housing, tools, clothing, art, rituals, and more.


Author Notes

Carl Waldman is a freelance writer and the author of numerous books on Native Americans for Facts On File/Checkmark Books, including Atlas of the North American Indian, Revised Edition, Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes, Revised Edition, and Word Dance: The Language of Native American Culture. He resides in Cherry Valley, NY.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

The two encyclopedias reviewed here give similar coverage to the Indian tribes of America. Both are quite limited in their coverage of the Mexican and Latin American tribes that settled the Southwest, although the Waldman book does include a section on those tribes as their influence relates to the Southwestern U.S. Neither is as comprehensive as the four-volume Gale Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes [RBB S 1 98]. Waldman`s Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes is a revised edition of a book published in 1988. In A^-Z format, it gives an overview of the history and culture of tribes and peoples from Abenaki to Zuni. Focus is on U.S. North American tribes, but there is also coverage of cultural groupings in Canada and Central America. The volume is notable for its ease of use, its wonderful illustrations, and the great starting point it provides for junior and senior high-school students and even undergraduate students attempting to understand the history of Native Americans. Cross-references are extensive, there is a diagram of the cultural languages and families, and the index and glossary are well constructed and easy to use. Information is clearly presented and illustrates that the history of the various tribes is ongoing and that native peoples are an integral part of what America was and has become. Johnson's Macmillan Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes is the second edition of a more scholarly and in-depth work. Rather than being arranged alphabetically, it is arranged by cultural and geographical areas subdivided by language groups and then by family and tribe (e.g., Northeastern Woodlands--Iroquoian--Huron). At the beginning of each geographical-cultural section, there is a chart displaying language families and tribes; within the section, individual tribes are grouped by language family. The indexing in the volume lists only tribe names, illustrations, and maps, and the cross-referencing between entries is minimal. Appendixes include lists of useful Web sites, powwows, museums, tribal population figures, locations of reservations by state, and principal tribes. The glossary is adequate but not extensive and includes some excellent illustrations. Overall, the quality of the text, illustrations, and photographs is very good, but the book's arrangement may prove difficult for those persons with only a rudimentary understanding of the cultural structure of Native American tribes. Waldman is recommended without reservation for junior-and senior-high students as well as public libraries and anyone interested in a basic understanding of the Native American Indian tribal history and current configuration. Johnson will make a good addition to academic collections, but those with somewhat limited budgets may wish to pass if they have the 1993 first edition or if their collections include the Gale set.


Library Journal Review

The traditional lifestyles and customs of individual North American tribes and their history after contact with encroaching whites are topics discussed in alphabetical entries ranging from Abenaki to Zuni. Cross-referenced segments on cultural areas, i.e., Northeast, supplement the information given under individual tribal headings. Sections on prehistory, Mayas, Aztecs, and Olmecs are included. Entries contain a lot of information but are often chatty, rambling discussions that stray from the topic. The work does not go significantly beyond Barbara Leitch's A Concise Dictionary of Indian Tribes of North America (LJ 4/1/80). Recommended for public libraries lacking Leitch.Mary B. Davis, Museum of the American Indian Lib., New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5 Up-A splendid revision. While not exhaustive, this volume provides an examination of more than 150 groups of Native American peoples. The alphabetically arranged entries vary in length from a few paragraphs to several pages. The content has been updated to reflect both new information about the past and current issues, and the language has been significantly modified to reflect more contemporary sensibilities and to make the text more readable. The colorful drawings, almost exact duplicates of those in the 1988 edition, are mostly of artifacts, structures, or costumes and serve nicely to clarify descriptions. The brightness and color have been enhanced, adding luster to the overall look of the book. Maps provide a frame of reference for the articles on major cultural groups. All libraries, including those that own other titles on the subject, should give serious consideration to this valuable work.-Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Although juvenile reference works often present complicated subjects in a simplified manner, simplification has been carried to extremes in this book. The author presents theories or suppositions of anthropologists as firm facts, which is not only annoying but potentially dangerous. His choice of information to present on each tribe is questionable: he often neglects to mention the most important aspects of tribes but spends too much space on relatively unimportant details. The writing style is vague and imprecise, resulting in sentences that are confusing to an adult reader well-versed in the subject; how they would strike young readers who know little about Indian tribes can only be imagined. The book's organization is also poor. Only a brief introduction is offered, the reading list (woefully short) is given at the back instead of combining references with each article, there is only a single map, and the index is inadequate. Finally, the illustrations are crude drawings based on photographs; publication of the originals would have been far more useful. Not recommended; Bill Yenne's Encyclopedia of North American Indian Tribes (1986) fills the same need and is far superior. -B. R. Johnson, formerly American Museum of Natural History


Excerpts

Excerpts

This comprehensive guide examines the more than 150 tribes in North America as well as prehistoric peoples and civilizations. Organized alphabetically by tribe or group, the book summarizes the historical record--such as locations, migrations, contacts with non-Indians, wars--and includes present-day tribal status. Traditional Indian lifeways, such as language, clothing, houses, transportation, tools, arts, legends, and rituals are highlighted. Culture areas--geographic regions where various Indian peoples had lifeways are common--are used to further organize information and present it in an understandable way to readers. Revised features include: Important recent developments in American Indian political issues and cultural affairs Updated coverage of prehistoric Indians as well as Mesoamerican civilizations based on new archeological evidence and more exact dating techniques Recent activism, such as demonstrations at Plymouth, Massachusetts and the blockade at the Oka and Kahnawake reserves near Montreal Information on preferred names now in use by certain tribes and groups. Excerpted from Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes by Carl Waldman All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.