Cover image for The divine duty of servants : a book of worship based on the artwork of Bruno Schulz
Title:
The divine duty of servants : a book of worship based on the artwork of Bruno Schulz
Author:
Perez, Rolando.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Brooklyn, NY : Cool Grove Press, 2000.

©1999
Physical Description:
xxviii, 141 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781887276177

9781887276160
Format :
Book

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PG7157.S2942 P47 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Fiction. Art. THE DIVINE DUTY OF SERVANTS is a unique work that unites prose and art, to explore the dark mythologies of sexual fetishes and power. If it is true, as the French writer Georges Bataille claims, that eroticism and religion go together, then this book sheds light on the eroticism of worship. THE DIVINE DUTY OF SERVANTS is based on the drawings and etchings of the Polish writer/artist, Bruno Schulz, who died at the hands of the Nazis in 1941. THE DIVINE DUTY OF SERVANTS introduces the work of outsider Malcolm McKesson a writer and an artist who like Bruno Schulz, dealt with such topics as foot fetishism, cross-dressing, and erotic scenes of bondage and submission.


Summary

Cultural Writing. This unique work unites prose and art, exploring the dark mythologies of sexual fetishes and power. Based on the erotic drawings and etchings of Polish writer and artist Bruno Schulz, who died at the hands of the Nazis in 1942. Rolando Perez digs around in that rooted turf Schulz describes; he grows his own books in that fecund loam of literature and history, dreams and ideas. His writing is often inspired by or a response to his reading, which is wide and deep --John Strausbaugh, NY Press.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

The Polish Jewish artist and writer Bruno Schulz perished at the hands of the Nazis in 1942. His work survives in two novels (The Street of Crocodiles; Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass) and he has been praised by such writers as Philip Roth and Cynthia Ozick. This curioius series of vignettes is supposedly based on the erotic drawings of s&m scenarios and foot fetishism that Schulz obsessively drew, although Perez and Cool Grove Press were denied permission by the Schulz estate to reproduce any of Schultz's actual work. Instead, Perez's untethered musings about foot worship, cruel mistresses and erotic humiliation are accompanied by anachronistic photos of "hired models," Perez's own "fetishy photographs" and drawings by the late Malcolm McKesson. Novelist and playwright Perez reimagines fairy tale princesses like Snow White and Cinderella as dominatrices enjoying the favors of their worshipers, and The Odyssey's Circe as commanding a herd of pigs thrilled to be dehumanized in servicing her. Vignettes explore such characters taken from Schulz's writings as the haughty servant girls Undula and Adela, while other insubstantial sketches aim to delineate the erotic visions and political theories of the Marquis de Sade, Wilhelm Reich, Marx and Freud. In relation to these innovators, Perez's interpretive scenarios seem exploitative and pretentious. A slapdash introduction by John Strausbaugh sets up the reader for disappointment, claiming that this book can offer some insight on the question "why we love the master" in the context of Germany's embrace of Hitler. The effort does not deliver on such lofty promises: while it seems clear that the complex interstices of power and submissive eroticism resonated poignantly for the artist Schulz, Perez's graphic stylings merely titillate and attempt to shock. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Polish Jewish artist and writer Bruno Schulz perished at the hands of the Nazis in 1942. His work survives in two novels (The Street of Crocodiles; Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass) and he has been praised by such writers as Philip Roth and Cynthia Ozick. This curioius series of vignettes is supposedly based on the erotic drawings of s&m scenarios and foot fetishism that Schulz obsessively drew, although Perez and Cool Grove Press were denied permission by the Schulz estate to reproduce any of Schultz's actual work. Instead, Perez's untethered musings about foot worship, cruel mistresses and erotic humiliation are accompanied by anachronistic photos of "hired models," Perez's own "fetishy photographs" and drawings by the late Malcolm McKesson. Novelist and playwright Perez reimagines fairy tale princesses like Snow White and Cinderella as dominatrices enjoying the favors of their worshipers, and The Odyssey's Circe as commanding a herd of pigs thrilled to be dehumanized in servicing her. Vignettes explore such characters taken from Schulz's writings as the haughty servant girls Undula and Adela, while other insubstantial sketches aim to delineate the erotic visions and political theories of the Marquis de Sade, Wilhelm Reich, Marx and Freud. In relation to these innovators, Perez's interpretive scenarios seem exploitative and pretentious. A slapdash introduction by John Strausbaugh sets up the reader for disappointment, claiming that this book can offer some insight on the question "why we love the master" in the context of Germany's embrace of Hitler. The effort does not deliver on such lofty promises: while it seems clear that the complex interstices of power and submissive eroticism resonated poignantly for the artist Schulz, Perez's graphic stylings merely titillate and attempt to shock. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved