Cover image for Deep South
Title:
Deep South
Author:
Barr, Nevada.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
340 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Map of the historic route of the Trace on endpapers.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
840 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6.5 18.0 46845.

Reading Counts RC High School 7.1 24 Quiz: 24205 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780399145865
Format :
Book

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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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FICTION Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

"What lifts the Anna Pigeon novels far above most of the other contemporary amateur sleuth mysteries is Barr's exquisite writing -- it swoops, it soars, sails then catches you unawares beneath the heart and takes your breath away, " proclaimed the Cleveland Plain Dealer of last year's Liberty Falling. In Deep South, Nevada Barr takes our breath away once again as her heroine travels cross-country to Mississippi, only to encounter terrible secrets in the heart of the south.

The handwritten sign on the tree said it all: Repent. For Anna Pigeon, this should have been reason enough to turn back for her beloved Mesa Verde. Instead she heads for the Natchez Trace Parkway and the promotion that awaits her. Almost immediately, she finds herself in the midst of controversy: as the new district ranger, she faces resentment so extreme her ability to do her job may be compromised, and her life may very well be in danger. But all thoughts of personal safety are set aside with the discovery of a young girl's body in a country cemetery, a sheet around her head, a noose around her neck.

The kudzu is thick and green, the woods dark and full of secrets. And the ghosts of violence hover as Anna struggles for answers to questions that, perhaps, should never be asked. Deep South proves that, "like the parks and monuments she writes of, Nevada Barr should be declared a national treasure" (The Bloomsbury Review).


Author Notes

Nevada Barr was born on March 1, 1952. She is the author of a series of mysteries involving national parks. She draws on her own experience as a National Park Service ranger to thrill readers with the majesty of nature. Anna Pigeon, the heroine of such novels as A Superior Death and Endangered Species, is a rough-and-tough ranger who left the wilds of New York for the great outdoors, and is modeled after Barr.

Barr began writing in 1978, garnering national attention with the publication in 1993 of Track of the Cat, which won both the Agatha and Anthony awards for Best First Mystery Novel. Her novels are known for breathtaking descriptions of nature, diverse settings, and a no-nonsense heroine. She also provides frequently unflattering portrayals of the National Park Service.

Her works include 13 1/2, Winterstudy, Borderline, Burn, The Rope and Destroyer Angel.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

A promotion causes forest ranger Anna Pigeon to leave Mesa Verde National Park for the lush, humid warmth of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi and Tennessee. But even though the people and places are different, Anna still finds herself embroiled in solving a deadly crime that is rooted in the land and history around her. The southern setting of this eighth Anna Pigeon mystery will seem strange to some series fans, but the novel offers the same strengths as its predecessors: vivid prose, a surprising plot, and a cast of sympathetic, well-rounded characters, both series regulars and a new crew of rangers and locals. There are some new pleasures as well: Barr effectively captures the beauty and menace of nature below the Mason Dixon Line and provides thoughtful insights into teens, race, and the Civil War. There is comedy as well, especially in the character of Randy Thigpen, the ultimate employee from hell. Barr solidifies her position as the preeminent writer of outdoor mysteries. --John Rowen


Publisher's Weekly Review

Since 1993 and Track of the Cat, Barr has been writing about National Park ranger Anna Pigeon. Each novel has been set in a different park, but one constant has been how the gutsy and deeply independent Anna has drawn her strength from, and maintained her sanity by, living among some of the most glorious and remote landscapes in America. Now, having decided that she needs to think about her financial future, Anna has snagged a promotion to district ranger. The catch is that she must leave her beloved Western parks behind and move to the Port Gibson section of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi. There's no wilderness here, and she feels overwhelmed by the humidity, the streams of tourists and campers and the ever-encroaching kudzu vines. But then Anna discovers one teenage girl in a prom dress dead drunk in an old cemetery and another murdered in the deep woods of the Trace, with a KKK-type hood and noose tied over her head. Anna and the local sheriff uncover plenty of suspects and motives as they team up to investigate. As the first woman ranger in the district, Anna must also learn to deal with male subordinates who challenge her authority. Whether Anna, for whom the solitude of the wilderness has always been essential, can find her equilibrium remains to be seen. But Barr produces another suspenseful and highly atmospheric mystery, illuminated even in this new setting by her trademark lyricism in writing about the natural world. Author tour. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Popular park ranger Anna Pigeon leaves the Southwest for the Natchez Trace ParkwayÄwhere her first task is to solve a murder with racial overtones. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

YA-This eighth mystery in the series, set in the Natchez Trace Parkway, is a real disappointment. When the body of a 15-year-old girl dressed for her prom is found half buried along the old portion of the trail, U.S. Parks Ranger Anna Pigeon must deal with sex discrimination and racial problems as well as adjust to the intricate culture of a small Mississippi town in order to solve the case. The story lacks the exciting plot and tension of some of the series' previous bestsellers such as Firestorm (1996) and Blind Descent (1998, both Putnam). (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.