Cover image for Chicken Sunday
Title:
Chicken Sunday
Author:
Polacco, Patricia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[New Rochelle, NY] : Spoken Arts, [1992]

â„—1992
Physical Description:
1 audiocassette (13 min.) : analog + 1 book ([32] pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm)
General Note:
Side 1: With tones. Side 2: No tones.

Based on the book by the same title, Philomel Books, c1992.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
650 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 6108.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.8 2 Quiz: 02101 Guided reading level: N.
ISBN:
9780804566995

9780399221330
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

Call Number
CASSETTE KIT 1088

On Order

Summary

Summary

A beautiful Easter bonnet for a special friend is at the root of this story about three children mistakenly accused of throwing eggs at a shop window


Summary

After being initiated into a neighbor's family by a solemn backyard ceremony, a young Russian American girl and her African American brothers' determine to buy their gramma Eula a beautiful Easter hat. But their good intentions are misunderstood, until they discover just the right way to pay for the hat that Eula's had her eye on. A loving family story woven from the author's childhood.

"Polacco has outdone herself with these joyful, energetic illustrations, her vibrant colors even richer and more intense than usual, while authentic details enhance the interest. A unique piece of Americana." -- Kirkus Reviews , pointer review

"In this moving picture book, the hatred sometimes engendered by racial and religious differences is overpowered by the love of people who recognize their common humanity." -- Booklist , starred, boxed review

"The text conveys a tremendous pride of heritage as it brims with rich images from her characters' African American and Russian Jewish cultures--A tribute to the strength of all family bonds." -- Publishers Weekly , starred review


Author Notes

Patricia Polacco was born in Lansing, Michigan on July 11, 1944. She attended Oakland Tech High School in Oakland, California before heading off to the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, then Laney Community College in Oakland. She then set off for Monash University, Mulgrave, Australia and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia where she received a Ph.D in Art History, Emphasis on Iconography.

After college, she restored ancient pieces of art for museums. She didn't start writing children's books until she was 41 years old. She began writing down the stories that were in her head, and was then encouraged to join the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. There she learned how to put together a dummy and get a story into the form of a children's picture book. Her mother paid for a trip to New York, where the two visited 16 publishers in one week. She submitted everything she had to more than one house. By the time she returned home the following week, she had sold just about everything.

Polacco has won the 1988 Sydney Taylor Book Award for The Keeping Quilt, and the 1989 International Reading Association Award for Rechenka's Eggs. She was inducted into the Author's Hall of Fame by the Santa Clara Reading Council in 1990, and received the Commonwealth Club of California's Recognition of Excellence that same year for Babushka's Doll, and again in 1992 for Chicken Sunday. She also won the Golden Kite Award for Illustration from the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators for Chicken Sunday in 1992, as well as the Boston Area Educators for Social Responsibility Children's Literature and Social Responsibility Award. In 1993, she won the Jane Adams Peace Assoc. and Women's Intl. League for Peace and Freedom Honor award for Mrs. Katz and Tush for its effective contribution to peace and social justice. She has won Parent's Choice Honors for Some Birthday in 1991, the video Dream Keeper in 1997 and Thank You Mr. Falker in 1998. In 1996, she won the Jo Osborne Award for Humor in Children's Literature. Her titles The Art of Miss. Chew and The Blessing Cup made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Patricia Polacco was born in Lansing, Michigan on July 11, 1944. She attended Oakland Tech High School in Oakland, California before heading off to the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, then Laney Community College in Oakland. She then set off for Monash University, Mulgrave, Australia and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia where she received a Ph.D in Art History, Emphasis on Iconography.

After college, she restored ancient pieces of art for museums. She didn't start writing children's books until she was 41 years old. She began writing down the stories that were in her head, and was then encouraged to join the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. There she learned how to put together a dummy and get a story into the form of a children's picture book. Her mother paid for a trip to New York, where the two visited 16 publishers in one week. She submitted everything she had to more than one house. By the time she returned home the following week, she had sold just about everything.

Polacco has won the 1988 Sydney Taylor Book Award for The Keeping Quilt, and the 1989 International Reading Association Award for Rechenka's Eggs. She was inducted into the Author's Hall of Fame by the Santa Clara Reading Council in 1990, and received the Commonwealth Club of California's Recognition of Excellence that same year for Babushka's Doll, and again in 1992 for Chicken Sunday. She also won the Golden Kite Award for Illustration from the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators for Chicken Sunday in 1992, as well as the Boston Area Educators for Social Responsibility Children's Literature and Social Responsibility Award. In 1993, she won the Jane Adams Peace Assoc. and Women's Intl. League for Peace and Freedom Honor award for Mrs. Katz and Tush for its effective contribution to peace and social justice. She has won Parent's Choice Honors for Some Birthday in 1991, the video Dream Keeper in 1997 and Thank You Mr. Falker in 1998. In 1996, she won the Jo Osborne Award for Humor in Children's Literature. Her titles The Art of Miss. Chew and The Blessing Cup made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

/*STARRED REVIEW*/ Ages 4-9. Polacco's picture books, based on events in her childhood, have an engaging homeyness that makes each new one as welcome as a letter from an old friend. Springing from reminiscence, they transform memories through the storyteller's art. In this story, Polacco recalls the days when she took Winston and Stewart, two African American neighbor boys, as her brothers "by a solemn ceremony we had performed in their backyard one summer. They weren't the same religion as I was. They were Baptists. Their gramma, Eula Mae Walker, was my gramma now. My babushka had died two summers before." Those familiar with Polacco's books will remember her babushka as the Russian-born grandmother who helped overcome her fear of storms, in Thunder Cake. United in loving Miss Eula, the three children decide to earn the money to buy her the Easter hat she yearns for, but when they go to Mr. Kodinsky's shop, he mistakes them for the vandals who have pelted his door with eggs, and he calls Miss Eula to complain. Struggling for her sake to earn back his respect, the children make him a basket of Pysanky decorated eggs (commonly known as Ukranian Easter eggs). "Chutzpah, you have chutzpah!" he says, inviting them for tea and sharing memories of his Russian homeland, which the decorated eggs have inspired. Then he gives them the bonnet for Miss Eula, saying "Tell her that I know you are very good children, such good children!" As formal and dramatic as a series of tableaux, the well-composed, double-page spreads portray a variety of settings, characters, and emotions with sensitivity. The deep, warm tones are lit with bright colors and varied patterns. Details such as the "Last Supper" fan at the Baptist church, the photographs of children and grandchildren in Miss Eula's home, and the framed icons at Patricia's house give the story a strong sense of place, or rather, of several distinct and well-defined places. Polacco deftly weaves the strands of the individuals' lives and traditions together into a tapestry that is the child's life: new, yet enriched by the cultural diversity of her world. Miss Eula's hymn singing "like slow thunder and sweet rain" comes from one tradition, Patricia's kitchen drawer of egg-decorating supplies from another, the reference to Mr. Kodinsky's hard life and the numbers stenciled on his arm (never mentioned, never explained, yet there for the curious reader to ask about) from yet another. Each adds threads to the pattern of individual histories that color the story at hand without interrupting the flow of the narrative. Though ethnic differences too often divide and even destroy people, this first-person narrative merges various traditions with the innocent acceptance of childhood. In this moving picture book, the hatred sometimes engendered by racial and religious differences is overpowered by the love of people who recognize their common humanity. In strident and divisive times, here is a quiet, confident voice of hope. (Reviewed Mar. 15, 1992)0399221336Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Polacco--in the role of young narrator--introduces another cast of characters from her fondly remembered childhood. Brothers Stewart and Winston often invite the girl to join them and their Gramma Eula Mae--whose choir singing is ``like slow thunder and sweet rain''--at the Baptist church and to come for Miss Eula's bountiful chicken dinner. When the children hear Miss Eula longing for the fancy Easter bonnet in Mr. Kodinsky's hat shop, they plot to raise the money to buy it for her. Sharing her own family tradition, the narrator teaches the boys how to decorate Russian ``pysanky'' eggs, that both turn a profit and touch the heart of the crotchety immigrant hatmaker. Without being heavy-handed, Polacco's text conveys a tremendous pride of heritage as it brims with rich images from her characters' African American and Russian Jewish cultures. Her vibrant pencil-and-wash illustrations glow--actual family photographs have been worked into several spreads. Other telling details--Russian icons, flowing choir robes, Mr. Kodinsky's concentration camp tattoo--further embellish this moving story--a tribute to the strength of all family bonds. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- Despite the differences in religion, sex, and race, Winston and Stewart Washington are young Patricia's best friends, and she considers their grandmother, Miss Eula, a surrogate since her own ``babushka'' died. On Sundays, she often attends Baptist services with her friends, and Miss Eula fixes a sumptuous fried chicken dinner with all the trimmings, after stopping to admire the hats in Mr. Kodinski's shop. The youngsters hope to buy her one, but when they approach the merchant looking for work, he mistakenly accuses them of pelting his shop with eggs. To prove their innocence, the children hand-dye eggs in the folk-art style that Patricia's grandmother had taught her and present them to the milliner. Moved by the rememberance of his homeland, the Russian Jewish emigre encourages the children to sell the ``Pysanky'' eggs in his shop and rewards their industry with a gift of the hat, which Miss Eula proudly wears on Easter Sunday. Polacco's tale resonates with the veracity of a personal recollection and is replete with vivid visual and visceral images. Her unique illustrative style smoothly blends detailed line drawing, impressionistic painting, primitive felt-marker coloring, and collage work with actual photographs, resulting in a feast for the eyes as filling as Miss Eula's Chicken Sunday spreads. The palette is equally varied, while the application of color is judiciously relieved by sporadic pencil sketches. An authentic tale of childhood friendship. --Dorothy Houlihan, formerly at White Plains Pub . Lib . , NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

/*STARRED REVIEW*/ Ages 4-9. Polacco's picture books, based on events in her childhood, have an engaging homeyness that makes each new one as welcome as a letter from an old friend. Springing from reminiscence, they transform memories through the storyteller's art. In this story, Polacco recalls the days when she took Winston and Stewart, two African American neighbor boys, as her brothers "by a solemn ceremony we had performed in their backyard one summer. They weren't the same religion as I was. They were Baptists. Their gramma, Eula Mae Walker, was my gramma now. My babushka had died two summers before." Those familiar with Polacco's books will remember her babushka as the Russian-born grandmother who helped overcome her fear of storms, in Thunder Cake. United in loving Miss Eula, the three children decide to earn the money to buy her the Easter hat she yearns for, but when they go to Mr. Kodinsky's shop, he mistakes them for the vandals who have pelted his door with eggs, and he calls Miss Eula to complain. Struggling for her sake to earn back his respect, the children make him a basket of Pysanky decorated eggs (commonly known as Ukranian Easter eggs). "Chutzpah, you have chutzpah!" he says, inviting them for tea and sharing memories of his Russian homeland, which the decorated eggs have inspired. Then he gives them the bonnet for Miss Eula, saying "Tell her that I know you are very good children, such good children!" As formal and dramatic as a series of tableaux, the well-composed, double-page spreads portray a variety of settings, characters, and emotions with sensitivity. The deep, warm tones are lit with bright colors and varied patterns. Details such as the "Last Supper" fan at the Baptist church, the photographs of children and grandchildren in Miss Eula's home, and the framed icons at Patricia's house give the story a strong sense of place, or rather, of several distinct and well-defined places. Polacco deftly weaves the strands of the individuals' lives and traditions together into a tapestry that is the child's life: new, yet enriched by the cultural diversity of her world. Miss Eula's hymn singing "like slow thunder and sweet rain" comes from one tradition, Patricia's kitchen drawer of egg-decorating supplies from another, the reference to Mr. Kodinsky's hard life and the numbers stenciled on his arm (never mentioned, never explained, yet there for the curious reader to ask about) from yet another. Each adds threads to the pattern of individual histories that color the story at hand without interrupting the flow of the narrative. Though ethnic differences too often divide and even destroy people, this first-person narrative merges various traditions with the innocent acceptance of childhood. In this moving picture book, the hatred sometimes engendered by racial and religious differences is overpowered by the love of people who recognize their common humanity. In strident and divisive times, here is a quiet, confident voice of hope. (Reviewed Mar. 15, 1992)0399221336Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Polacco--in the role of young narrator--introduces another cast of characters from her fondly remembered childhood. Brothers Stewart and Winston often invite the girl to join them and their Gramma Eula Mae--whose choir singing is ``like slow thunder and sweet rain''--at the Baptist church and to come for Miss Eula's bountiful chicken dinner. When the children hear Miss Eula longing for the fancy Easter bonnet in Mr. Kodinsky's hat shop, they plot to raise the money to buy it for her. Sharing her own family tradition, the narrator teaches the boys how to decorate Russian ``pysanky'' eggs, that both turn a profit and touch the heart of the crotchety immigrant hatmaker. Without being heavy-handed, Polacco's text conveys a tremendous pride of heritage as it brims with rich images from her characters' African American and Russian Jewish cultures. Her vibrant pencil-and-wash illustrations glow--actual family photographs have been worked into several spreads. Other telling details--Russian icons, flowing choir robes, Mr. Kodinsky's concentration camp tattoo--further embellish this moving story--a tribute to the strength of all family bonds. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-- Despite the differences in religion, sex, and race, Winston and Stewart Washington are young Patricia's best friends, and she considers their grandmother, Miss Eula, a surrogate since her own ``babushka'' died. On Sundays, she often attends Baptist services with her friends, and Miss Eula fixes a sumptuous fried chicken dinner with all the trimmings, after stopping to admire the hats in Mr. Kodinski's shop. The youngsters hope to buy her one, but when they approach the merchant looking for work, he mistakenly accuses them of pelting his shop with eggs. To prove their innocence, the children hand-dye eggs in the folk-art style that Patricia's grandmother had taught her and present them to the milliner. Moved by the rememberance of his homeland, the Russian Jewish emigre encourages the children to sell the ``Pysanky'' eggs in his shop and rewards their industry with a gift of the hat, which Miss Eula proudly wears on Easter Sunday. Polacco's tale resonates with the veracity of a personal recollection and is replete with vivid visual and visceral images. Her unique illustrative style smoothly blends detailed line drawing, impressionistic painting, primitive felt-marker coloring, and collage work with actual photographs, resulting in a feast for the eyes as filling as Miss Eula's Chicken Sunday spreads. The palette is equally varied, while the application of color is judiciously relieved by sporadic pencil sketches. An authentic tale of childhood friendship. --Dorothy Houlihan, formerly at White Plains Pub . Lib . , NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.