Cover image for Cherries and cherry pits
Title:
Cherries and cherry pits
Author:
Williams, Vera B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Saint Petersburg, Fla.] : Spoken Arts, [1991]

â„—1991
Physical Description:
1 audiocassette (31 min.) : analog + 1 paperback book ([40] pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm)
Summary:
Bidemmi draws pictures and tells stories about cherries.
General Note:
A read-along.

Based on the book of the same title by Vera B. Williams.

Audible page turn signals on side 1 ; no signals on side 2.

Durations: 15:12 (each side).
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 610 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 0.5 27480.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.9 2 Quiz: 02074 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780804566735

9780688104788
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

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CASSETTE KIT 1072 TEXT Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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CASSETTE KIT 1072 TEXT Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

For use in schools and libraries only. Bidemmi, a little girl who loves to draw, makes up all kinds of imaginative stories about the fascinating people she creates in her artwork.


Summary

No one can tell a story quite like Bidemmi. When she starts to draw, her imagination takes off. Enter her world, look at her pictures, and watch her stories grow and grow--just like the forest of cherry trees she imagines right on her own block.


Author Notes

Vera Baker Williams was born on January 28, 1927 in Hollywood, California. She studied at the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and Black Mountain College in North Carolina, where she received a BFA in graphic arts. She co-found the Gate Hill Cooperative and the Collaberg School, in Stony Point, New York.

She worked as a teacher and artist before becoming a writer and illustrator of children's books. She won a Caldecott Medal award and the Boston Globe-Horn Book award in the picture book category in 1983 for A Chair for My Mother, a Caldecott Medal award in 1991 for "More More More" Said the Baby: Three Love Stories, the Boston Globe-Horn Book award in fiction in 1994 for Scooter, and the NSK Neustadt Prize for Children's Literature in 2009.

She was a member of the executive committee of the War Resisters League from 1984 to 1987, and served a month at a federal penitentiary for participating in a women's peaceful blockade of the Pentagon. She died on October 16, 2015 at the age of 88.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Vera Baker Williams was born on January 28, 1927 in Hollywood, California. She studied at the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and Black Mountain College in North Carolina, where she received a BFA in graphic arts. She co-found the Gate Hill Cooperative and the Collaberg School, in Stony Point, New York.

She worked as a teacher and artist before becoming a writer and illustrator of children's books. She won a Caldecott Medal award and the Boston Globe-Horn Book award in the picture book category in 1983 for A Chair for My Mother, a Caldecott Medal award in 1991 for "More More More" Said the Baby: Three Love Stories, the Boston Globe-Horn Book award in fiction in 1994 for Scooter, and the NSK Neustadt Prize for Children's Literature in 2009.

She was a member of the executive committee of the War Resisters League from 1984 to 1987, and served a month at a federal penitentiary for participating in a women's peaceful blockade of the Pentagon. She died on October 16, 2015 at the age of 88.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Bidemmi draws and tells stories about her neighbors in the city, with each story revolving around a bag of ripe red cherries. (O 15 86)


Publisher's Weekly Review

The creator of A Chair for My Mother, Something Special for Me and other stories for children introduces us to another irresistible heroine. Bedemmi loves to draw pictures with colored markers and write stories that always start ``with the word THIS.'' Exquisitely decorated and deceptively simple, the book alternates between the narrator's spare descriptions and evocative watercolors, and Bedemmi's own captivating tales and vivid, imaginative drawings. The book's title refers to Bedemmi's storiesall of which involve folks ``eating cherries and spitting out the pits, eating cherries and spitting out the pits.'' What about all those pits? Bedemmi has an ``important plan.'' She will plant them in her yard so they will grow ``until there is a whole forest of cherry trees right on our block.'' Williams's latest work is another glowing tale of the transformational power of a child's creativity and love. (4-up) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2 Bidemmi, a young black child, draws splendid pictures. ``As she draws, she tells the story of what she is drawing,'' always starting with the word ``this.'' Bidemmi's brightly colored words and pictures introduce children to the man with the nice face that's dark brown; to the tiny, white, grandmotherly lady; and to the tall boy who is much like Bidemmi's own brother. Finally, Bidemmi tells her story, revealing her wish for her neighborhood and her world. Each story involves cherriesbuying, sharing, and enjoying them. The man with the nice face shares them with his children, the tiny lady with her parrot, the tall boy with his little sister. Bidemmi will eat her cherries and then plant the pits, nourish them, watch them grow, and share the fruit with people from all over the neighborhood. Williams uses a first-person narrator to tie these tales together. Very different styles of illustration further define who is speaking. Soft, beautifully-crafted watercolors depict Bidemmi as the narrator speaks. As Bidemmi herself tells her stories, fresh, child-like, highly detailed illustrations done in lustrous colored markers are used. Well formated text and illustrations complement, enhance, and extend each other. All together, this is a fresh and imaginative book which exudes a respect for and understanding of children. Maria B. Salvadore, District of Columbia Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Bidemmi draws and tells stories about her neighbors in the city, with each story revolving around a bag of ripe red cherries. (O 15 86)


Publisher's Weekly Review

The creator of A Chair for My Mother, Something Special for Me and other stories for children introduces us to another irresistible heroine. Bedemmi loves to draw pictures with colored markers and write stories that always start ``with the word THIS.'' Exquisitely decorated and deceptively simple, the book alternates between the narrator's spare descriptions and evocative watercolors, and Bedemmi's own captivating tales and vivid, imaginative drawings. The book's title refers to Bedemmi's storiesall of which involve folks ``eating cherries and spitting out the pits, eating cherries and spitting out the pits.'' What about all those pits? Bedemmi has an ``important plan.'' She will plant them in her yard so they will grow ``until there is a whole forest of cherry trees right on our block.'' Williams's latest work is another glowing tale of the transformational power of a child's creativity and love. (4-up) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2 Bidemmi, a young black child, draws splendid pictures. ``As she draws, she tells the story of what she is drawing,'' always starting with the word ``this.'' Bidemmi's brightly colored words and pictures introduce children to the man with the nice face that's dark brown; to the tiny, white, grandmotherly lady; and to the tall boy who is much like Bidemmi's own brother. Finally, Bidemmi tells her story, revealing her wish for her neighborhood and her world. Each story involves cherriesbuying, sharing, and enjoying them. The man with the nice face shares them with his children, the tiny lady with her parrot, the tall boy with his little sister. Bidemmi will eat her cherries and then plant the pits, nourish them, watch them grow, and share the fruit with people from all over the neighborhood. Williams uses a first-person narrator to tie these tales together. Very different styles of illustration further define who is speaking. Soft, beautifully-crafted watercolors depict Bidemmi as the narrator speaks. As Bidemmi herself tells her stories, fresh, child-like, highly detailed illustrations done in lustrous colored markers are used. Well formated text and illustrations complement, enhance, and extend each other. All together, this is a fresh and imaginative book which exudes a respect for and understanding of children. Maria B. Salvadore, District of Columbia Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.