Cover image for Nickommoh! : a Thanksgiving celebration
Title:
Nickommoh! : a Thanksgiving celebration
Author:
Koller, Jackie French.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Describes a typical Narragansett Nickommoh, or harvest celebration, as it has been performed since before the arrival of the first Pilgrims in New England.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 820 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.0 0.5 34589.

Reading Counts RC K-2 4.1 2 Quiz: 30977 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689810947
Format :
Book

Available:*

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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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E99.N16 K65 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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Summary

Summary

It is Taqountikeeswush, the Moon of the Falling Leaves. The Creator's gifts have been harvested, dried, and tucked away in auqunnash [storage bins] in the bosom of Earth Mother. They will provide for the People all through the long, cold months to come, the long, cold months of Papone. It is time, now. Time for the People to come together, together to give thanks. NICKOMMOH! Long before the Pilgrims celebrated their first Thanksgiving at Plymouth, the Native Americans of the area celebrated the harvest during a feast called Nickommoh, meaning "give away" or "exchange." The Pilgrims' Thanksgiving was actually more similar to this traditional Native American celebration than to the holiday as we celebrate it today. Jackie French Koller's festive prose poem brings to life the weaving rhythms of this harvest celebration, as the People come together from villages near and far to construct sweat lodges, eat turkey and sweet cakes, play games, and dance and sing beneath the star blanket that Moon Sister has drawn across the sky. Marcia Sewall uses her considerable knowledge of the Narragansett people to portray in striking pictures the ancient patterns of our first purely American holiday.


Author Notes

Jackie French Koller is a prolific children's author.

Jackie's first book, Impy for Always, was published in 1989. She's gone on to write over 30 other books including The Keepers and Dragonling Series.

Koller's books have received numerous awards and accolades - among them ALA Notable Book and IRA Teachers' Choice.

Jackie lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and when she's not writing she enjoys painting, reading, hiking, making gingerbread houses, and playing with her grandchildren.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-8. Nickommoh was a harvest festival celebrated by the Narragansett tribe during Taqountikeeswush, the Moon of the Falling Leaves. Long before Europeans settled in North America, the Narragansett celebrated the harvest with three days of games, feasts, and contests of skill. Scratchboard and gouache illustrations in autumn colors spill across the pages, showing tribal members constructing sweat lodges, playing games, donning special garments, and dancing in great circles. Nickommoh, which means "give away," included a special dance for which people donated extra food, furs, and clothing. The sachem (leader) distributed the gifts to widows, orphans, and others in need. Unfortunately, there is no pronunciation guide for the many Narragansett words incorporated throughout the text, though definitions are appended. An excellent alternative to the many books about Thanksgiving. --Karen Hutt


Publisher's Weekly Review

If Squanto (reviewed above) offers background to the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving, Koller (The Promise, reviewed p. 62) demonstrates that a celebratory gathering to commemorate the harvest, Nickommoh, had long been the custom on these shores. In prose with the cadence of a drumbeat, the author reveals the rhythms of Narragansett life, devoted to the Creator, Kautantawwitt, and punctuated by praise: "They come together, together to give thanks. Nickommoh!" In marked contrast to her usual style, Sewall's (The Pilgrims of Plimoth) scratchboard and gouache illustrations convey both simplicity and complexity. Even as she portrays individualsÄmen cutting poles for the great lodge, women covering the poles with bark, children playing tug-of-warÄher compositions build a unity among the characters. Almost hypnotic in their power, art and text are infused with the communal spirit of Thanksgiving. Ages 6-9. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 4-"It is Taqountikeeswush, the Moon of the Falling Leaves. Time for the People to come together, together to give thanks. NICKOMMOH!" Koller's poetic narrative builds a sequence of activities: coming together, building a shelter, feasting, playing games, entering a sweat lodge, and dancing. Each double-page spread ends with the exclamation, "NICKOMMOH!," a word defined in the glossary as "a celebrational gathering." An author's note explains that "Long before the first Pilgrim set foot in the New World, Native Americans were celebrating rites of thanksgiving ." Sewall's strongly composed, impressionistic illustrations have black outlines and rich earth tones to anchor and solidify the poetic text. Vivid descriptions draw readers into the life of the Narragansett Indian tribe who once lived in present-day Rhode Island. The writing is studded with words from the Narragansett language, which are all defined in an informative glossary. This engaging partnership of art and text will be a natural read-aloud in the weeks before Thanksgiving.-Margaret A. Chang, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.