Cover image for Forty fortunes : a tale of Iran
Title:
Forty fortunes : a tale of Iran
Author:
Shepard, Aaron.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
A well-intentioned fortune-telling peasant unwittingly tricks a band of local thieves into returning the king's stolen treasure.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 600 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.9 0.5 46138.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.4 2 Quiz: 18589.
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780395811337
Format :
Book

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PZ8.S3425 FO 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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PZ8.S3425 FO 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

The royal treasure has been stolen, and not even Iran's finest diviners can locate the forty fortunes. When the King turns to Ahmed to find the treasure, Ahmed is certain that he will be thrown in prison. Yes, he was able to locate a missing ring, but that was pure luck, and he knows that he has no real fortunetelling skills. He has only forty days to find the forty fortunes. Will he find a way to locate the treasure-and save himself-before the time is up? This retelling of a traditional Iranian folktale, charged with humor and action, is paired with fabulous jewel-toned illustrations.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Ahmed's wife, Jamell, is not satisfied with her humble existence, and insists that her husband become a fortune-teller to earn more money. Ahmed reluctantly agrees and, through a stroke of luck, succeeds in solving the first problem put to him. When 40 treasure chests are stolen from the King and his diviners cannot determine the culprits, Ahmed is called in and threatened with life in prison should he fail. He buys some time by asking for 40 days, one for each thief. During that time, another stroke of luck allows him to discover the identity of the robbers, but it is Ahmed's ingenuity that brings the tale to its satisfying conclusion. Shepard's version of this story is a well-paced combination of humor and action. Watercolors in bright tones capture the amusing situations and accurately depict the setting. Shepard includes notes on his sources and other elements of the story. A reader's theater script and more information on divination and Iranian customs can be found at the author's Web site. A lively addition to folklore shelves.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.