Cover image for The owl and the pussycat
Title:
The owl and the pussycat
Author:
Lear, Edward, 1812-1888.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Owl and the pussy-cat
Edition:
[First edition].
Publication Information:
[New York] : HarperCollins, [1998]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
After a courtship voyage of a year and a day, Owl and Pussy finally buy a ring from Piggy and are blissfully married.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.5 0.5 5531.
ISBN:
9780062050106

9780062050113
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The Owl and the Pussycat of Lear's ballad are truly made for each other, as depicted by James Marshall in these poignant, slaphappy illustrations. Only Marshall could have shown us the Owl serenading the pampered Pussycat on the deck of the S.S. Dorabella, or the Pussycat posing for travel photographs, or the happy couple's goofy wedding dance "by the light of the moon."

Here is a final gift from this greatly beloved creator of children's books.


Author Notes

Edward Lear was born in Holloway, England, to Jeremiah (a stockbroker) and Ann Lear, tutored at home by his sister, and briefly attended the Royal Academy schools. Both an author and an illustrator, he earned his living as an artist from the age of 15, mainly by doing landscapes. What he is remembered for is his nonsense books, especially his popularization of the limerick. Along with Lewis Carroll, he is considered to be the founder of nonsense poetry.

In addition to his limericks, he created longer nonsense poems. The best---and best known---is The Jumblies, in which the title characters go to sea in a sieve; it is a brilliant, profound, silly, and sad expression of the need to leave the security of the known world and experience the wonder and danger of the unknown. His other most notable work is The Owl and the Pussy Cat, a less complex poem whose title characters also go to sea. Lear produced humorous alphabets and botany books as well.

His wordplay, involving puns, neologisms, portmanteau words, and anticlimax, retains its vitality today and has influenced such contemporary writers of children's nonsense verse as Shel Silverstein, Ogden Nash, and Laura Richards

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 2-5. Lear's classic poem has been illustrated many times, but this lovely picture-book version combines harmonious full-color scenes with visual restraint. The splendid nonsense rolls on, fully supported but never overwhelmed by the artwork.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Lear's narrative poem has been popular for over 100 years, with good reason. The wonderful rhythm and nonsensical wordsruncible spoon, Piggy-wig, Bongtreemake this verse a joy for both the adult reading the book and the young listener. The owl and the pussycat ``sailed away for a year and a day,'' declared their love for each other, decided to marry, landed on an island and, after the ceremony, ``dined on mince and slices of quince,'' then ``danced by the light of the moon.'' Cauley has illustrated many nursery tales with humor, attention to detail and glowing beautythis book is no exception. The shimmering waves reveal playful creatures of the ocean. On the island, the flora and fauna are abundant and brightly colored. (26) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-With this collection of 24 limericks and poems, Hague joins scores of other illustrators who have interpreted the poet's comic vision. Unfortunately, his busy and carefully autographed paintings, whose dark tones and stylized people and landscapes echo the styles of illustrators like N. C. Wyeth and Arthur Rackham, seem too ponderous for Lear's dancing rhymes. The illustration for "There Was a Young Lady whose Eyes" is more grotesque than funny; the image of a young boy wrapped in a turban that accompanies "The Cummerbund" evokes racial stereotypes. These poems and limericks cry for the light touch of someone like Fred Marcellino (The Pelican Chorus and Other Nonsense [HarperCollins, 1995]).æKathleen Whalin, Greenwich Country Day School, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.