Cover image for Super cool science : South Pole stations, past, present, and future
Title:
Super cool science : South Pole stations, past, present, and future
Author:
Markle, Sandra.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker, 1998.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 24 X 26 cm
Summary:
Text and photographs tell the story of science research stations at the South Pole, including the one currently under construction which will launch a new era of science.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.3 1.0 67103.
ISBN:
9780802784704

9780802784711
Format :
Book

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Q180.56 .M37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Text and photographs tell the story of science research stations at the South Pole, including the one currently under construction which will launch a new era of science.

Includes bibliographical references and index.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. In a book heavily illustrated with full-color photographs, Markle introduces the research stations at the South Pole and describes how those stations suit certain types of scientific investigation. First, she takes readers back to the first station, built in 1956 and now covered by snow drifts, that served primarily as a military base. The second station that now houses researchers and crew, is shown both under construction and in its current state, slowly disappearing under the snow. Plans are shown for the National Science Foundation's new, larger South Pole Station, designed to minimize snow drifts. Markle briefly discusses some of the observations and experiments conducted at the South Pole. With its clear writing and intriguing photos, this book serves as a basic introduction to a unique research location. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5‘Sitting on an ice layer as thick, to use Markle's measure, as 500 school bus lengths, the research stations at the South Pole have sheltered scientists since the late 1950s. Except for the tops of chimneys and antennas, the first facility has been completely buried; as the second is well on its way to the same fate, a third is currently under construction. The author explains how the combination of clear ice, clean air, long nights, and harsh climate makes the area a prime site for research by astronomers, planetologists, ecologists, and those in many other fields, thus justifying the work involved in building new stations. The brief text accompanies full-color photos and artists' views that not only show a variety of buildings and instruments adapted to the bitter conditions, but also effectively capture the South Pole's utter remoteness. Use this as a lead-in to more detailed accounts of the continent's exploration and settlement, such as Laurence Pringle's Antarctica (S & S, 1992) or Markle's own Pioneering Frozen Worlds (Atheneum, 1996).‘John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.