Cover image for Asian religions in America : a documentary history
Title:
Asian religions in America : a documentary history
Author:
Tweed, Thomas A.
Publication Information:
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xvi, 416 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1280 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780195113389

9780195113396
Format :
Book

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BL2525 .A85 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Asian religions have a long and intriguing history in America. For over two centuries, Asian immigrants have been coming to America and bringing their religions with them. Some Americans have reacted with alarm to the arrival of heathen religions on American shores, while others have taken refuge with lamas from Tibet, yogis from India, and Zen masters from Japan.


Summary

Asian religions have a long and intriguing history in America. For over two centuries, Asian immigrants have been coming to America and bringing their religions with them. Some Americans have reacted with alarm to the arrival of heathen religions on American shores, while others have takenrefuge in lamas from Tibet, yogis from India, and Zen masters from Japan. Asian Religions in America: A Documentary History is the first text to show the breadth and depth of the American encounter with Asian religions. Ranging from 1784 to the present, it features over one hundred excerpts and dozens of illustrations drawn from literature, art, music, sports,philosophy, theology, politics, and law. Selections discuss Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Shinto, Confucianism, and Taoism and their places in the American religious landscape. Martial artist Bruce Lee, Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist, Beatles star John Lennon, Chinese-Americanwriter Amy Tan, African-American activist Frederick Douglass, Vietnamese Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh, and dozens of lesser-known immigrants and Asian Americans are all represented. The editors have provided a general historical introduction, an overview of Asian religions, four section introductions,and concise explanatory headnotes for each entry. The volume is further enhanced by helpful reference materials including a detailed chronology, suggestions for further reading, and an index. Asian Religions in America: A Documentary History serves as an exceptional text for courses in Asian religions, world religions, and religion in America, and is also enlightening reading for academics and general readers.


Author Notes

Thomas A. Tweed is at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Stephen Prothero is at Boston University.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This is a very helpful and original documentary history of Asian religions in America and the American encounter with them. Tweed (Univ. of North Carolina) and Prothero (Boston Univ.) have collected over 100 documents that trace interactions between Americans and Asian religions from 1784 to the present. These documents, along with careful editorial introductions, show a multifaceted engagement, from reports of travelers and missionaries, to the struggles of contemporary Asian immigrants to establish their religious traditions in the strange new religious world of the US. There are some familiar and expected selections in an anthology such as this, but many more that stretch conventional boundaries, especially concerning the interactions between various forms of American culture and Asian religions. For example, selections from the Tao of Pooh, Philip Glass, and the "Beastie Boys" are included. Well over half the selections are from the 20th century, which gives this work a fresh and inviting quality, appealing to students and scholars alike. All levels. M. A. Granquist St. Olaf College


Choice Review

This is a very helpful and original documentary history of Asian religions in America and the American encounter with them. Tweed (Univ. of North Carolina) and Prothero (Boston Univ.) have collected over 100 documents that trace interactions between Americans and Asian religions from 1784 to the present. These documents, along with careful editorial introductions, show a multifaceted engagement, from reports of travelers and missionaries, to the struggles of contemporary Asian immigrants to establish their religious traditions in the strange new religious world of the US. There are some familiar and expected selections in an anthology such as this, but many more that stretch conventional boundaries, especially concerning the interactions between various forms of American culture and Asian religions. For example, selections from the Tao of Pooh, Philip Glass, and the "Beastie Boys" are included. Well over half the selections are from the 20th century, which gives this work a fresh and inviting quality, appealing to students and scholars alike. All levels. M. A. Granquist St. Olaf College