Cover image for Advice to young artists in a postmodern era
Title:
Advice to young artists in a postmodern era
Author:
Dunning, William V., 1933-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Syracuse, NY : Syracuse University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xiii, 188 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780815605263
Format :
Book

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N8350 .D86 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Is art a matter of inspiration or learning? This text offers practical advice to young artists hoping to make the transition from art school student to independent artist. Topics include how to approach and deal with galleries and dealers, how to set up a studio and how to finance the transition.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Dunning bases his advice on a lifetime of personal experience as well as "words of wisdom" gleaned from a vast pool of references. Indeed, he claims that "reading is the primary key to everything" and that "problem finding" is the most fundamental aspect of all art making. Juxtaposed with his profound personal experience with a Rothko painting are such practical suggestions as how to prepare a portfolio to gain acceptance at a gallery; the pros and cons of working for a graduate degree; and how to set up an easel so as to benefit most from one's light source. Relying on the researches of psychologists like Getzels and Csikszentmihalyi (1976) and Howard Gardner (1983), and the comments of artists like Barnett Newman or Paolo Soleri, Dunning provides a contemporary context for aspiring artists--to lay the conceptual groundwork for the "aesthetic experience." And Dunning moves easily between the more theoretical or speculative notions about the art world and the very practical, exhaustively complete aspects of making it in that world. Those who seek a career in this art world would do well to read thoughtfully these Polonius-like admonitions. Others will gain more respect for the very complex business of art-making. General readers; undergraduate and graduate students; professionals. K. Marantz Ohio State University