Cover image for Poems
Title:
Poems
Author:
Prynne, J. H., 1936-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
South Fremantle, W.A. : Folio/Fremantle Arts Centre Press ; Newcastle upon Tyne : Bloodaxe, 1999.
Physical Description:
440 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781852244910

9781852244927
Format :
Book

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PR6066.R9 A17 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Offers the collected poems of Great Britain's leading experimental poet.


Summary

J.H. Prynne is Britain's leading late Modernist poet. His austere yet playful poetry challenges our sense of the world, not by any direct address to the reader but by showing everything in a different light, enacting slips and changes of meaning through shifting language. Not since the late work of Ezra Pound and the Maximus series of Charles Olson have the possibilities of poetry been so fundamentally questioned and extended as they are in the life work of J.H.Prynne. This new selection - his first full-length book for fifteen years - is a landmark in modern poetry.


Author Notes

J. H. Prynne is Britain's leading late Modernist poet. His austere yet playful poetry challenges our sense of the world, not by any direct address to the reader but by showing everything in a different light, enacting slips and changes of meaning through shifting language.


J. H. Prynne is Britain's leading late Modernist poet. His austere yet playful poetry challenges our sense of the world, not by any direct address to the reader but by showing everything in a different light, enacting slips and changes of meaning through shifting language.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Many readers of so-called innovative or experimental verse regard Prynne as Britain's most important living poet. Until now, most of his work has been available only in small editions and chapbooks. This collection of all Prynne's books, from The Kitchen Poems (1968) to For the Monogram (1997), is therefore a literary event without recent parallel. Prynne, who teaches at Cambridge University, is the center of a group known as the Cambridge poets. His peculiarly local influence is no accident, since he has stayed away from large-scale publishing; he made this decision partly to honor the poems' quiet, hermetic quality, and partly as a response to the absorption of experimental poetics into academic parlance-a parallel, for Prynne, to capitalism's absorption of opposition. Prynne's difficulties demand, and reward, close attention. His early work shows what he learned from Charles Olson, switching from personal to political to geological frames of reference in a single phrase. Enjoyable for their complex logic and concealed wit, these early poems often alternate incompatible metres, creating a distinctive discursive cascade. Next to these recalcitrant works Prynne has placed sequences like "Day Light Songs," more lyrical, less dense and equally accomplished: "And so when it does/ rain & will glide/ down our necks like/ glances into/ the soul, drop/ lets work their/ way forward the sinus/ is truly the scent/ of the earth, upraised." While never a rabble-rousing avant-gardist, Prynne continues to make startling discoveries. Not-You (1993) introduces staggered lines that fall together like tone clusters: "Her pan click/ elb/ second fix/ for them/ pencil/ breather park/ over/ talk at small to." Her Weasels Wild Returning (1994) fuses its dense phrasings to create a consistent persona: "I saw/ her wings in speedy strip like a shadow in the sand/ or in growth like natural reason, her heart so vast..." Prynne's reticence belies his powers-powers many more readers can now hear. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Publisher's Weekly Review

Many readers of so-called innovative or experimental verse regard Prynne as Britain's most important living poet. Until now, most of his work has been available only in small editions and chapbooks. This collection of all Prynne's books, from The Kitchen Poems (1968) to For the Monogram (1997), is therefore a literary event without recent parallel. Prynne, who teaches at Cambridge University, is the center of a group known as the Cambridge poets. His peculiarly local influence is no accident, since he has stayed away from large-scale publishing; he made this decision partly to honor the poems' quiet, hermetic quality, and partly as a response to the absorption of experimental poetics into academic parlance-a parallel, for Prynne, to capitalism's absorption of opposition. Prynne's difficulties demand, and reward, close attention. His early work shows what he learned from Charles Olson, switching from personal to political to geological frames of reference in a single phrase. Enjoyable for their complex logic and concealed wit, these early poems often alternate incompatible metres, creating a distinctive discursive cascade. Next to these recalcitrant works Prynne has placed sequences like "Day Light Songs," more lyrical, less dense and equally accomplished: "And so when it does/ rain & will glide/ down our necks like/ glances into/ the soul, drop/ lets work their/ way forward the sinus/ is truly the scent/ of the earth, upraised." While never a rabble-rousing avant-gardist, Prynne continues to make startling discoveries. Not-You (1993) introduces staggered lines that fall together like tone clusters: "Her pan click/ elb/ second fix/ for them/ pencil/ breather park/ over/ talk at small to." Her Weasels Wild Returning (1994) fuses its dense phrasings to create a consistent persona: "I saw/ her wings in speedy strip like a shadow in the sand/ or in growth like natural reason, her heart so vast..." Prynne's reticence belies his powers-powers many more readers can now hear. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

Kitchen Poems (1968)p. 9
Day Light Songs (1968)p. 25
Voll Verdienstp. 33
The White Stones (1969)p. 37
A Note on Metal [1968]p. 127
5 Uncollected Poemsp. 133
Fire Lizard (1970)p. 141
Brass (1971)p. 149
10 Uncollected Poemsp. 181
A Night Square (1971)p. 193
Into The Day (1972)p. 201
Wound Response (1974)p. 215
The Plant Time Manifold Transcriptsp. 233
2 Uncollected Poemsp. 243
High Pink on Chrome (1975)p. 247
The Land of Saint Martinp. 265
Vernal Aspectsp. 271
News of Warring Clans (1977)p. 275
4 Uncollected Poemsp. 287
Down where changed (1979)p. 293
The Oval Window (1983)p. 311
Bands Around the Throat (1987)p. 341
Word Order (1989)p. 359
Jie ban mi Shi Hu (1992)p. 379
Not-You (1993)p. 381
Her Weasels Wild Returning (1994)p. 409
For the Monogram (1997)p. 417
Index of Titles or First Linesp. 433
Kitchen Poems (1968)p. 9
Day Light Songs (1968)p. 25
Voll Verdienstp. 33
The White Stones (1969)p. 37
A Note on Metal [1968]p. 127
5 Uncollected Poemsp. 133
Fire Lizard (1970)p. 141
Brass (1971)p. 149
10 Uncollected Poemsp. 181
A Night Square (1971)p. 193
Into The Day (1972)p. 201
Wound Response (1974)p. 215
The Plant Time Manifold Transcriptsp. 233
2 Uncollected Poemsp. 243
High Pink on Chrome (1975)p. 247
The Land of Saint Martinp. 265
Vernal Aspectsp. 271
News of Warring Clans (1977)p. 275
4 Uncollected Poemsp. 287
Down where changed (1979)p. 293
The Oval Window (1983)p. 311
Bands Around the Throat (1987)p. 341
Word Order (1989)p. 359
Jie ban mi Shi Hu (1992)p. 379
Not-You (1993)p. 381
Her Weasels Wild Returning (1994)p. 409
For the Monogram (1997)p. 417
Index of Titles or First Linesp. 433