Cover image for Muhammad Ali's greatest fight : Cassius Clay vs. the United States of America
Title:
Muhammad Ali's greatest fight : Cassius Clay vs. the United States of America
Author:
Bingham, Howard L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : M. Evans and Co., [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
271 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780871319005
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
GV1132.A44 B55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
GV1132.A44 B55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
GV1132.A44 B55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
GV1132.A44 B55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
GV1132.A44 B55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight is a behind-the-scenes account of this battle as told by a genuine insider--Ali's closest friend, photographer Howard Bingham.


Author Notes

Howard Lenoid Bingham was born in Jackson, Mississippi on May 29, 1939. He attended Compton Community College and was hired as a photographer by The Los Angeles Sentinel. He was fired after 18 months for spending too much time on his own photographing weddings and other events. He became a freelance photographer who took pictures of Muhammad Ali, photographed the Black Panthers for Life and riots in various cities for Life magazine, and covered the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968. He also worked for Time, Ebony, Newsweek, and Sports Illustrated. He published several books of photographs including Muhammad Ali: A Thirty-Year Journey and Howard L. Bingham's Black Panthers 1968. He died on December 15, 2016 at the age of 77.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Here, Bingham (Muhammad Ali: A Thirty-Year Journey), Muhammad Ali's best friend and favorite photographer, contends that the former heavyweight champ's greatest legacy is that, owing to his conversion to the Nation of Islam and subsequent refusal to enter the military during the Vietnam War, Ali served as a touchstone for the racial and antiwar upheavals that rocked the Sixties and changed our country. Bingham offers a friendly portrayal of the conscientious objector/Black Muslim minister Ali but doesn't beyond a shadow of a doubt answer the question of whether his motives for evading the draft were self-serving, racial, or religious--though it is easy to imagine that at the least they might have evolved from the former to the latter. One cannot deny Ali's influence on his times, though. And neither can one deny that, whatever his motives for refusing military service, he paid a great price by being banned from boxing for three and a half years during his prime. While not "The Greatest," as its subject proclaimed himself, Bingham's book deserves a place in the sports collections of most public libraries. With a foreword by Ali himself, this book ably supplements the Hauser and Remnick biographies.--Jim G. Burns, Ottumwa P.L., IA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. 9
Chapter 1 Louisville and the Lipp. 11
Chapter 2 Those Who Came Beforep. 29
Chapter 3 A Modern Crusadep. 51
Chapter 4 The Making of Muhammad Alip. 79
Chapter 5 "I Ain't Got No Quarrel with Them Vietcong"p. 103
Chapter 6 The Stepp. 133
Chapter 7 Backlashp. 161
Chapter 8 Exilep. 183
Chapter 9 Return from the Wildernessp. 209
Chapter 10 Vindicationp. 237
Afterwordp. 251
Acknowledgmentsp. 261
Sourcesp. 263
Indexp. 269