Cover image for Why not, Lafayette?
Title:
Why not, Lafayette?
Author:
Fritz, Jean.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : G.P. Putnam's, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
87 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Traces the life of the French nobleman who fought for democracy in revolutions in both the United States and France.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
900 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.7 3.0 2475.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.3 6 Quiz: 21531.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399234118
Format :
Book

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E207.L2 F87 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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E207.L2 F87 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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E207.L2 F87 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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E207.L2 F87 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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E207.L2 F87 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

Traces the life of the French nobleman who fought for democracy in revolutions in both the United States and France. "Informative, interesting, and immensely readable."--"School Library Journal." Illustrations.


Author Notes

Jean Fritz was born in Hankow, China on November 16, 1915. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Wheaton College in 1937. She wrote picture books and historical fiction before focusing on historical nonfiction. Her first book, Bunny Hopewell's First Spring, was published in 1954. Her other books included And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?; Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?; Can't You Make Them Behave, King George?; Shh! We're Writing the Constitution; Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold; Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus?; Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?; The Double Life of Pocahontas; and George Washington's Mother.

Homesick: My Own Story, a collection of linked narratives, traces her life from her girlhood in China to her longed-for yet uneasy passage to America. It won a National Book Award and was named a Newbery Honor Book. She received the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, the National Humanities Medal, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award and the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature for her body of work. She died on May 14, 2017 at the age of 101.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-8. Fritz returns with another of her lively biographies, chock-full of quotes, anecdotes, and wry humor. This time she examines the life of General Lafayette, the young French leader who was an instrumental figure in the American Revolution. After the briefest mention of his childhood, she jumps straight to 1777, when the 20-year-old marquis set sail for the colonies to offer his military services. Fritz does a solid job of documenting his role fighting for democracy both in the U.S. and in France, and she is a master at bringing the small moments to life. Less successful are her attempts at condensing events of the Revolution: descriptions of Benedict Arnold's treason and Lafayette's victory in Yorktown are sketchy and undramatic, and they may confuse readers without much prior knowledge of the events. The biography hits its highest point in the closing chapters, as Lafayette returns to America for a final visit. Her portrait of the aging general welcomed by cheering crowds and old friends is an emotional climax to an account well told. Illustrations by Ronald Himler add to the atmosphere, and notes and a bibliography are appended. --Randy Meyer


Publisher's Weekly Review

A starred review in PW said, "With her typically light touch, Fritz presents a biography of the aristocratic young Frenchman who played a pivotal role in the American Revolution. Lively, vigorous and just plain fun to read." Ages 8-12. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-In an informal yet informative narrative, Fritz presents the life of the French nobleman who came to espouse the democratic cause and worked toward achieving it. He not only fought successfully in the American Revolution, and proved himself as a leader of men, but also participated in advancing freedom in his own country and freed slaves in French territories. The author recounts the Marquis's full and honorable life, which spanned many important events in history including the French Revolution and the rise and fall of Napoleon. There is a lot of history contained in a little over 70 pages but despite its brevity, the book provides a great deal of information. A background knowledge of the time is useful to understanding some of the events fully. A well-executed, full-page pencil drawing appears in every chapter and serves to enliven the presentation. This competently written and documented title will not disappoint Fritz's many fans.-Marlene Gawron, Orange County Library, Orlando, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.