Cover image for In praise of public life
Title:
In praise of public life
Author:
Lieberman, Joseph I.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
174 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780684867748

9780684867755
Format :
Book

Available:*

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E840.8.L467 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Argues that the boundaries between public and private life must be restored in order for political leaders to regain the respect and support they deserve.


Author Notes

Joseph Lieberman, February 24, 1942 - Joseph Lieberman was born in Stamford, Connecticut on February 24, 1942, and attended public schools there. He received his bachelor's degree from Yale College in 1964 and his law degree from Yale Law School in 1967. In 1970, he was elected to the Connecticut State Senate and served for ten years, including the last six as Majority Leader. In 1980, he returned to private legal practice, and from 1982 to 1988, he served as Connecticut's 21st Attorney General.

Lieberman was first elected to the United States Senate in 1988. In 2000, Lieberman was elected by another overwhelming margin to a third term. Lieberman is Ranking Member and former Chairman of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. In addition, he is a member of the Environment and Public Works Committee; of the Armed Services Committee, where he is Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on AirLand Forces and sits on the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities, and the Small Business Committee. Lieberman is also a former Chairman of the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this slender volume, the junior U.S. senator from Connecticut makes a heartfelt case that the ills of American society can be corrected by working within the current political system rather than by overhauling it. While acknowledging that the federal government is far from perfect, Lieberman contends that it has many more good people than bad and that the process succeeds more often than fails. During his two terms in office, Lieberman has staked out a position as a moderate Democrat, firmly embracing the title of "New Democrat" first articulated by Bill Clinton when he was governor of Arkansas. Through cooperation and compromise, Congress has supported the Clinton administration in passing a number of crucial pieces of legislation (e.g., the 1993 balanced budget, NAFTA and GATT trade agreements) that the senator believes have helped spur the country's record economic growth. Lieberman also contends that the entertainment industry has played a major role in the decline in America's moral values; the entertainment industry doesn't reflect social norms but rather shapes values and influences behavior, Lieberman argues, and steps need to be taken to make the major media outlets act more for the public good. With so many politicians writing about burnout and their frustrations with serving in elected office, it is refreshing to hear the point of view of someone who still finds politics a noble calling. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

A second-term senator (D-CT) defends government service. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Prologuep. 9
1 On Politics as a Careerp. 19
2 The Roots of a Public Lifep. 24
3 Mounting a First Campaignp. 39
4 Straight and Honestp. 48
5 Losingp. 54
6 The Modern Campaignp. 69
7 The Lifep. 93
8 The Jobp. 106
9 The Futurep. 139
Indexp. 165