Cover image for Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana tastes : exciting flavors from the state that cooks.
Title:
Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana tastes : exciting flavors from the state that cooks.
Author:
Prudhomme, Paul.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvii, 347 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688122249
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The master of Louisiana cuisine invites everyone to taste the new flavors of Louisiana cooking

Chef Paul Prudhomme put Louisiana cooking on the map. Fifteen years have passed since the publication of his groundbreaking Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. Now Chef Paul returns to his culinary roots to show us how Louisiana cooking has evolved.

Today, the culinary influences of Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and many other cuisines are being integrated into "traditional" Louisiana cooking. Chef Paul explores how Louisiana cooks have incorporated such newly available ingredients as lemongrass, fresh tamarind, and papaya into their dishes. As Chef Paul says, any Louisiana cook worth his or her salt will work with what's available -- familiar or not -- and turn it into something delicious. Andouille Spicy Rice gets its zing! from chipotle and pasilla chile peppers, and Roasted Lamb with Fire-Roasted Pepper Sauce is flavored with jalapeno peppers and fennel. Classic jambalaya, etouffee, and gumbo are reinvented with such far-flung ingredients as star anise, cilantro, yuca, plantain, and mango.


Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen is an exciting exploration of the new flavors that have made Louisiana cooking even better.

Chef Paul Prudhomme put Louisiana cooking on the map. Fifteen years have passed since the publication of his groundbreaking Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. Now Chef Paul returns to his culinary roots to show us how Louisiana cooking has evolved.

Today, the culinary influences of Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and many other cuisines are being integrated into "traditional" Louisiana cooking. Chef Paul explores how Louisiana cooks have incorporated such newly available ingredients as lemongrass, fresh tamarind, and papaya into their dishes. As Chef Paul says, any Louisiana cook worth his or her salt will work with what's available -- familiar or not -- and turn it into something delicious. Andouille Spicy Rice gets its zing! from chipotle and pasilla chile peppers, and Roasted Lamb with Fire-Roasted Pepper Sauce is flavored with jalapeno peppers and fennel. Classic jambalaya, etouffee, and gumbo are reinvented with such far-flung ingredients as star anise, cilantro, yuca, plantain, and mango.

Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. is an exciting exploration of the new flavors that have made Louisiana cooking even better.Chef Paul Prudhomme put Louisiana cooking on the map. Fifteen years have passed since the publication of his groundbreaking Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. Now Chef Paul returns to his culinary roots to show us how Louisiana cooking has evolved.

Today, the culinary influences of Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and many other cuisines are being integrated into "traditional" Louisiana cooking. Chef Paul explores how Louisiana cooks have incorporated such newly available ingredients as lemongrass, fresh tamarind, and papaya into their dishes. As Chef Paul says, any Louisiana cook worth his or her salt will work with what's available--familiar or not--and turn it into something delicious. Andouille Spicy Rice gets its zing! from chipotle and pasilla chile peppers, and Roasted Lamb with Fire-Roasted Pepper Sauce is flavored with jalapeno peppers and fennel. Classic jambalaya, etouffee, and gumbo are reinvented with such far-flung ingredients as star anise, cilantro, yuca, plantain, and mango.

Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen. is an exciting exploration of the new flavors that have made Louisiana cooking even better.


Author Notes

Paul Prudhomme was born on his family's farm near Opelousas, Louisiana on July 13, 1940. After graduating high school in 1957, he spent numerous years taking cooking jobs in restaurants and opening restaurants without much success. In 1975, he was hired as the executive chef at Commander's Palace and in 1979, Food and Wine magazine invited him to Tavern on the Green in New York to give a cooking demonstration for the food press. He and his wife opened K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen in New Orleans in 1979. His cookbooks include Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Cajun Magic Cookbook, Chef Paul Prudhomme's Fiery Foods That I Love, Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen, and The Prudhomme Family Cookbook: Old-Time Louisiana Recipes. In 1983, he created a food company, Magic Seasoning Blends, to sell his dry spices, rubs, sauces and marinades. He died after a brief illness on October 8, 2015 at the age of 75.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Along with Emeril Lagasse, New Orleans' indefatigable Paul Prudhomme has made Louisiana tastes national obsessions. Every contemporary cook must now serve at least one Cajun dish to confirm mastery of the spicy side of American cooking. Chronicling dishes from his native state, Prudhomme acknowledges that Louisiana home cooks don't normally serve anything so fancy as appetizers, so he offers dozens of ideas for starters that may readily serve as entrees by simply increasing portion size. Judging from Prudhomme's presentation, Louisiana tastes are clearly becoming more sophisticated: lamb pouches combine lamb and vegetables inside deep-fried wonton skins. But there are still down-home tastes such as a simple dish of mashed sweet potatoes and ham. Instead of the usual Cajun seasoning mix that Prudhomme formerly specified, each recipe now has its own unique seasoning mix varying from a few to a dozen spices and herbs. --Mark Knoblauch


Publisher's Weekly Review

In the 15 years since Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen first appeared, even traditional Louisiana tastes and flavors have gracefully accepted international influences, as the recipes here attest. Now there are parsnips, banana peppers and poblano chiles in Chicken and Oyster Gumbo; a quarter-cup of sliced ginger adds a lively punch to Stuffed Sirloin Tip Roast; yuca is a key ingredient in Lamb Stew with Greens.Even so, just about every recipe here employs blends of garlic powder, cayenne, dried herbs and other flavors that preserve the ' Creole/Cajun heritage. Recipes are as simple and solid as Vegetables and Chicken Ole!, in which all ingredients are combined and baked in one pan, and as time-consuming as Stuffed Flounder, in which deboned fish are layered with smoked Cheddar cheese topped with pureed crawfish tails (or shrimp) and vegetables. Desserts include Sweet Potato Custard and Apple Pie with Chiles and Cheese, which is tailor-made for Prudhomme's spice-loving fans. Author tour. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

It has been 15 years since Prudhomme's first cookbook was published (Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen), and his Cajun-Creole style of cooking (and, specifically, his blackened redfish) has become widely known and imitated. The recipes in his latest book use his familiar seasoning mixes (many of which are now marketed commercially), but they also incorporate ingredients that would have been unheard of in a Louisiana kitchen even a decade ago: Shrimp Mango Bisque, Veal-Stuffed Poblano Chiles, Penne with Lemongrass-Basil Pesto. The recipe instructions are very clear, with taste "guidepoints" (e.g., "...the caramelization brings out the natural sweetness of the onions...") italicized for emphasis. Prudhomme, who has several television cooking shows running concurrently, has a large following, and his new book is recommended for most libraries. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Appetizers to Start Things Off Right!p. 1
Soup: Wonderful by Itself or to Enliven the Meal!p. 29
Salads Are Like Sunshinep. 57
A Little of This, a Little of That: Condiments, Dressings, Dips, and So Forthp. 81
Beef, Lamb, Pork, and Vealp. 99
Poultryp. 177
Fish and Seafoodp. 211
Vegetarian Main Coursesp. 257
Side Dishes for Every Tastep. 275
Delightful Dessertsp. 297
Notes from My Ritchenp. 321
Indexp. 335