Cover image for Teaching transformed : achieving excellence, fairness, inclusion, and harmony
Title:
Teaching transformed : achieving excellence, fairness, inclusion, and harmony
Author:
Tharp, Roland G., 1930-2015.
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
xii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1350 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780813322681

9780813322698
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The four goals of school reform--academic excellence, fairness, inclusion and harmony--can be achieved simultaneously, by transforming the final common pathway of all school reform--instructional activity. Teaching Transformed is a new vision for classrooms, based on consensus research findings and unified practice prescriptions, explained and justified by new developments in sociocultural theory, and clarified by an explicit five-phase developmental guide for achieving that transformation. Teaching Transformed is both visionary and practical, both theoretical and data-driven, and determined to create effective education for all students. Professional educators, parents, and any reader concerned with saving our schools will find this book necessary to understand our current plight, and to envision a realistic means of transformation.


Summary

All school reformers are trying for better schooling; but all are not marching to the same drum. Four goals-- Excellence, Fairness, Inclusion and Harmony-- are emphasized by different groups. Are the four goals competing ideas of the good, so that national political debates must result in prioritizing, in winners and losers? Tharp, Estrada, Dalton, and Yamauchi demonstrate that the four goals can all be achieved, simultaneously and maximally, by classrooms of a new vision.All school reform has one final common pathway -- instructional activity. Whatever the specific reform, from policy or finance to teacher preparation, none will have any effect on student development except as it operates through the teaching-and-learning activities of classrooms. Teaching Transformed is a new vision for classrooms, based on consensus research findings and unified practice prescriptions, explained and justified by new developments in sociocultural theory, and clarified by an explicit five-phase developmental guide for achieving that transformation. In the spirit of Rousing Minds to Life, Teaching Transformed is both visionary and practical, both theoretical and data-driven, and determined to create effective education for all students. Professional educators, parents, policy makers, and any reader concerned with saving our schools will find this book necessary to understand our current plight, and to envision a realistic means of transformation.


Author Notes

Roland G. Tharp is chair of the Board of Studies in Education and professor of education and psychology at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Tharp is the recipient of the prestigious 1993 Grawemeyer Award in Education for his book Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning, and Schooling in Social Context (1988). Roland G. Tharp is chair of the Board of Studies in Education and professor of education and psychology at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Tharp is the recipient of the prestigious 1993 Grawemeyer Award in Education for his book Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning, and Schooling in Social Context (1988). Roland G. Tharp is chair of the Board of Studies in Education and professor of education and psychology at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Tharp is the recipient of the prestigious 1993 Grawemeyer Award in Education for his book Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning, and Schooling in Social Context (1988). Roland G. Tharp is chair of the Board of Studies in Education and professor of education and psychology at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Tharp is the recipient of the prestigious 1993 Grawemeyer Award in Education for his book Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning, and Schooling in Social Context (1988).


Roland G. Tharp is director of the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, & Excellence (CREDE) and professor of education and psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Tharp (Rousing Minds to Life, 1988, with R. Gallimore) and his colleagues hold that school reform has a "final common pathway: instructional activity." The major goals of all school reform, they believe, are excellence, fairness, inclusion. and harmony. Their aim, thus, is to present a vision of an ideal classroom in contrast with "the common tradition" of schooling and to describe practical ways for transforming classrooms. Their proposals "turn on a few points of theory": activity, sociocultural theory, development theory, and cognitive science. Their "intellectual architecture" involves quality criteria, generic principles, five standards for effective pedagogy, necessary conditions for effective instructional activity, and common values. The authors attempt to bring together all the elements by articulating the vision, giving examples, revealing its dynamics, clarifying its effects, supporting the vision with evidence, and exploring its potential for transforming teaching. An ambitious and complex book. Recommended for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. R. R. Sherman; emeritus, University of Florida


Choice Review

Tharp (Rousing Minds to Life, 1988, with R. Gallimore) and his colleagues hold that school reform has a "final common pathway: instructional activity." The major goals of all school reform, they believe, are excellence, fairness, inclusion. and harmony. Their aim, thus, is to present a vision of an ideal classroom in contrast with "the common tradition" of schooling and to describe practical ways for transforming classrooms. Their proposals "turn on a few points of theory": activity, sociocultural theory, development theory, and cognitive science. Their "intellectual architecture" involves quality criteria, generic principles, five standards for effective pedagogy, necessary conditions for effective instructional activity, and common values. The authors attempt to bring together all the elements by articulating the vision, giving examples, revealing its dynamics, clarifying its effects, supporting the vision with evidence, and exploring its potential for transforming teaching. An ambitious and complex book. Recommended for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. R. R. Sherman; emeritus, University of Florida


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. xi
1 Introduction and Overviewp. 1
Notesp. 12
2 Transformed Classrooms: Description, Principles, and Criteriap. 13
Notesp. 41
3 Activity in Theory and Classroomp. 43
Notesp. 67
4 Patterns of Instructional Activity and Relationshipsp. 69
Notesp. 103
5 Culture and Instructional Activityp. 105
6 Designing the Organization of Instructional Activityp. 137
7 Classrooms of Phase 5: Evidence, Vision, and Futurep. 217
Notesp. 238
Appendicesp. 239
Referencesp. 247
Indexp. 267
List of Tables and Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
1 Introduction and Overviewp. 1
The Goals of Activity and Teachingp. 1
The Goals of Educational Reform: Excellence, Fairness, Inclusion, and Harmonyp. 2
Can Schools Actually Provide Excellence, Fairness, Inclusion, and Harmony?p. 5
Unified Reformp. 7
Plan of the Bookp. 8
Notesp. 12
2 Transformed Classrooms: Description, Principles, and Criteriap. 13
Quality Criteria for Instructional Activity in Classroomsp. 16
Generic Principles for Effective Pedagogyp. 17
The Five Standards for Effective Pedagogyp. 21
Necessary Conditions for the Effective Organization of Instruction Activityp. 34
Common Values, Diverse Culturesp. 39
Conclusionp. 40
Notesp. 41
3 Activity in Theory and Classroomp. 43
The Social Construction of Mindp. 44
The Organization of Social Relationshipsp. 50
Social Relationships: The Dynamics of Formation and Changep. 55
Changing Patterns of Relationship for Improved Teaching and Learningp. 61
Conclusionp. 66
Notesp. 67
4 Patterns of Instructional Activity and Relationshipsp. 69
Propinquity: Affecting Inclusion, Fairness, and Harmony in Peer Relationshipsp. 70
Instructional Activity: Affecting Inclusion, Fairness, and Harmony in Peer Relationshipsp. 75
Peer Relationships, Friendship, and Academic and Social Excellencep. 88
Propinquity and Activity: Affecting Inclusion, Fairness, and Harmony in Teacher-Student Relationshipsp. 92
Propinquity, Activity, and the Quality of Teacher-Student Relationshipsp. 98
Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic and Social Excellencep. 100
Conclusionp. 102
Notesp. 103
5 Culture and Instructional Activityp. 105
Culture and Expectationsp. 107
Individualism and Collectivismp. 108
Role Expectations in the Classroomp. 115
Powerp. 124
Language Genres and Codes in the Classroomp. 129
Conclusionp. 134
6 Designing the Organization of Instructional Activityp. 137
Grade Level, Diversity, and Content Areap. 139
A Developmental Modelp. 140
Activity Settingsp. 141
The Instructional Framep. 144
Classroom Managementp. 151
Phase 1 One to Four Weeks: Building an Academic Learning Community Using Activity Settings and Instructional Framep. 156
Phase 2 Two to Three Weeks: Grouping for Independent and Simultaneous Activityp. 165
Phase 3 One to Two Weeks: Teaching and Learning in Activity Settingsp. 176
Phase 4 Two to Three Weeks: Teaching Through Activity Settingsp. 190
Phase 5 Routine for the Rest of the Year: Teaching Through Instructional Conversation with Multiple, Simultaneous Activity Settingsp. 200
Conclusionp. 215
7 Classrooms of Phase 5: Evidence, Vision, and Futurep. 217
The Organizational System for Instructional Activityp. 220
Theory and Dynamicsp. 221
Do Phase 5 Classrooms Achieve Excellence, Fairness, Inclusion, and Harmony?p. 223
Supporting Evidencep. 225
Shall We Improve Our Schools?p. 229
The Image of Schools in the Eyes of Educators and the Publicp. 231
Preparing Teachers for Phase 5p. 233
Notesp. 238
Appendicesp. 239
Referencesp. 247
Indexp. 267