Cover image for Freedomways reader : prophets in their own country
Title:
Freedomways reader : prophets in their own country
Author:
Jackson, Esther Cooper.
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xxx, 382 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Articles originally published in Freedomways.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1330 Lexile.
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780813367699
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

From 1961 to 1985, a period of massive social change for African Americans, Freedomways Quarterly published the leaders and artists of the black freedom movement. Figures of towering historical stature wrote for the journal, among them Paul Robeson, W.E.B. Du Bois, President Kwame Nkrumah and Julius Nyerere. Three Nobel Prize laureates appeared in its pages--Dr. Martin Luther King, Pablo Neruda, and Derek Walcott--and several Pulitzer Prize winners--Alice Walker and Gwendolyn Brooks. No other journal could boast such a long list of names from the civil rights movement: Freedomways was like no other journal. It was unique.Yet despite the well-known names, few Americans have heard of this national treasure. Why? Simply put, the United States was not ready for this journal in 1961. Today, many Americans cannot remember a United States where racial segregation was legal, but in 1961, many of the battles for integration were still to be won.This book is subtitled Prophets in their Own Country because the editors and contributors to Freedomways were not honored at the journal's inception. Eventually, however, much of their vision did come to pass. Until now, these documents, which show the depth and breadth of the struggle for democracy, had been lost to the public. The publication of the Freedomways Reader restores this lost treasury. It contains what amounts to an oral history of the liberation movements of the 1960s through the 1980s. Through the reports of the Freedom Riders, the early articles against the Vietnam War and South African apartheid, the short stories and poems of Alice Walker, and the memoirs of black organizers in the Jim Crow south of the Thirties, one can walk in the footsteps of these pioneers.


Author Notes

After graduating from Oberlin College in 1938 and receiving her Masters degree from Fiske University in 1940, Esther Cooper joined the staff of the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC) in Birmingham, Alabama. In the early 1940s, Cooper Jackson assumed the leadership of this early civil rights organization. Esther Cooper Jackson was part of the nucleus around W.E.B. Du Bois that founded the Freedomways Quarterly in 1961, a periodical devoted to furthering the civil rights struggle. As managing editor, Esther Cooper Jackson shepherded the magazine for twenty-five years until it ceased publication in 1986. She is also the co-editor of W.E.B. Du Bois: Black Titan and Paul Robeson: The Great Forerunner . She lives in Brooklyn, New York. After graduating from Oberlin College in 1938 and receiving her Masters degree from Fiske University in 1940, Esther Cooper joined the staff of the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC) in Birmingham, Alabama. In the early 1940s, Cooper Jackson assumed the leadership of this early civil rights organization. Esther Cooper Jackson was part of the nucleus around W.E.B. Du Bois that founded the Freedomways Quarterly in 1961, a periodical devoted to furthering the civil rights struggle. As managing editor, Esther Cooper Jackson shepherded the magazine for twenty-five years until it ceased publication in 1986. She is also the co-editor of W.E.B. Du Bois: Black Titan and Paul Robeson: The Great Forerunner . She lives in Brooklyn, New York.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Jackson was the original editor of Freedomways, a quarterly magazine published between 1961 and 1986, chronicling the struggle for racial justice in the U.S. The magazine featured contributions by many of the luminaries of black literature, art, and politics, including three Nobel Prize laureates: Martin Luther King Jr., Pablo Neruda, and Derek Wolcott. Other contributors included Alice Walker, James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Jomo Kenyatta, C. L. R. James, and common black folk. The collection features poetry, essays, speeches, articles. There are memoirs of a Birmingham coal miner, tributes to Paul Robeson, and reflections of black feminists, labor organizers, and prisoners. The anthology begins with articles actually written in the 1940s and 1950s, which provide historical context for the journal itself, followed by the pieces, organized topically, e.g., the Southern movement, international solidarity, the movement in the North, and art and activism. This comprehensive collection reflects the global nature of the struggle for equality and the longing for racial justice over an important 25-year period. --Vanessa Bush


Table of Contents

Julian BondEsther Cooper JacksonJ. H. O'DellW.E.B. Du BoisPaul RobesonAugusta StrongHenry O. MayfieldLouis E. BurnhamMartin Luther King Jr.Pablo NerudaJ. H. O'DellW.E.B. Du BoisJimmy McDonaldWhitney M. Young Jr.Julian BondJulian BondJames BaldwinPaul RobesonFred L. ShuttlesworthEric MortonStaughton LyndJ. H. O'DellLawrence Guyot and Mike ThelwellEsther Cooper Jackson and Constance PohlW.E.B. Du BoisOsagyefo Dr. Kwame NkrumahShirley Graham Du BoisShirley Graham Du BoisHon. Julius K. NyererePaul RobesonW.E.B. Du BoisRobert S. BrowneMartin Luther King Jr.Ralph David Abernathy and Howard Levy and J. H. O'DellJean Carey BondEsther Cooper Jackson and Constance PohlOssie DavisPaul RobesonJesse L. JacksonAlvin F. PoussaintDerrick A. BellHaywood BurnsAugusta StrongAngela Y. DavisDorothy BurnhamBruce McM. WrightFrank E. Chapman Jr.Lennox S. HindsErnest KaiserW.E.B. Du BoisShirley Graham Du BoisWilliam Loren KatzErnest KaiserRuby DeeAlice Childress and Paule Marshall and Sarah E. WrightGwendolyn BrooksAudre LordeAudre LordeNikki GiovanniJune JordanAlice WalkerAlice WalkerAlice WalkerLangston HughesArna BontempsSterling A. BrownDerek WalcottMarga HolnessKeith E. BairdLorraine HansberryJohn Oliver KillensAlex HaleyRuby DeeAlice WalkerAlice WalkerLoyle HairstonMax RoachAbbey LincolnPlaythell BenjaminHarry BelafonteDavid Levering Lewis
List of Photosp. xv
Forewordp. xvii
Introductionp. xix
Part I Origins of Freedomwaysp. 1
1 Behold the Land, No. 1, 1964p. 6
2 The Battleground Is Here, No. 1, 1971p. 12
3 Southern Youth's Proud Heritage, No. 1, 1964p. 16
4 Memoirs of a Birmingham Coal Miner, No. 1, 1964p. 21
5 "Not New Ground, but Rights Once Dearly Won," No. 1, 1962p. 26
6 Honoring Dr. Du Bois, No. 2, 1968p. 31
7 Ode to Paul Robeson, No. 1, 1976p. 40
Part 2 Reports from the Front Lines: Segregation in the Southp. 47
8 The United States and the Negro, No. 1, 1961p. 50
9 A Freedom Rider Speaks His Mind, No. 2, 1961p. 59
10 What Price Prejudice? On the Economics of Discrimination, No. 3, 1962p. 65
11 The Southern Youth Movement, No. 3, 1962p. 69
12 Nonviolence: An Interpretation, No. 2, 1963p. 72
13 Lorraine Hansberry at the Summit, No. 4, 1979p. 77
14 "We're Moving!" No. 1, 1971p. 82
15 Birmingham Shall Be Free Some Day, No. 1, 1964p. 84
16 Tremor in the Iceberg: The Mississippi Summer Project, No. 2, 1965p. 87
17 The Freedom Schools: Concept and Organization, No. 2, 1965p. 94
18 Life in Mississippi: An Interview with Fannie Lou Hamer, No. 2, 1965p. 97
19 The Politics of Necessity and Survival in Mississippi, No. 2, 1966p. 100
Part 3 International Solidarityp. 108
20 The American Negro and the Darker World, No. 3, 1968p. 111
21 Address to the United Nations, No. 1, 1961p. 119
22 What Happened in Ghana? The Inside Story No. 3, 1966p. 127
23 Kwame Nkrumah: African Liberator, No. 3, 1972p. 132
24 Socialism Is Not Racialism, No. 2, 1970p. 141
The Antiwar Movement
25 Selected Speeches and Writings on Peace, No. 1, 1971p. 145
26 The Giant Stirs, No. 1, 1966p. 150
27 The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam, No. 4, 1965p. 152
28 A Time to Break Silence, No. 2, 1967p. 167
29 Muhammad Ali: The Measure of a Man, No. 2, 1967p. 176
30 The GI Movement vs. the War: A Symposium, No. 4, 1970p. 179
South Africa
31 Three African Freedom Movements, No. 1, 1962p. 183
32 The African-American Manifesto on Southern Africa, No. 4, 1976p. 191
33 South Africa and the USA, No. 4, 1976p. 198
34 Northern Ireland Through Black Eyes, No. 1, 1982p. 200
Part 4 Moving Northp. 205
35 Anti-Semitism and Black Power, No. 1, 1967p. 207
Labor
36 Address to Labor: Who Built This Land? No. 1, 1971p. 210
37 Three Challenges to Organized Labor, No. 4, 1972p. 217
Education
38 Education and Black Self-Image, No. 4, 1968p. 222
39 School Desegregation: Seeking New Victories Among the Ashes, No. 1, 1977p. 229
40 The Bakke Case and Affirmative Action: Some Implications for the Future, No. 1, 1978p. 233
Women
41 Negro Women in Freedom's Battles, No. 4, 1967p. 237
42 Racism and Contemporary Literature on Rape, No. 1, 1976p. 243
43 Biology and Gender: False Theories About Women and Blacks, No. 1, 1977p. 248
Prison and the Courts
44 Bangs and Whimpers: Black Youth and the Courts, No. 3, 1975p. 253
45 Pages from the Life of a Black Prisoner, No. 4, 1971p. 259
46 The Death Penalty: Continuing Threat to America's Poor, No. 1, 1971p. 262
Part 5 Pioneers of Black Studiesp. 267
47 Conference of Encyclopedia Africana, No. 4, 1963p. 269
48 Negroes in the American Revolution, No. 2, 1961p. 273
49 Black/Indian Origins of the Fight for Democracy, No. 2, 1984p. 281
50 A Review of The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, No. 1, 1969p. 284
Part 6 Culture and the Cause of Black Freedomp. 289
51 The Negro Woman in American Literature, No. 1, 1966p. 291
Poetry
52 Paul Robeson, No. 1, 1971p. 299
53 Prologue, No. 1, 1972p. 300
54 Rites of Passage, No. 3, 1970p. 304
55 The Lion in Daniel's Den, No. 1, 1971p. 306
56 For Beautiful Mary Brown: Chicago Rent Strike Leader, No. 2, 1971p. 308
57 Rock Eagle, No. 4, 1971p. 310
58 Facing the Way, No. 4, 1975p. 313
59 The Abduction of Saints, No. 4, 1975p. 315
60 My Early Days in Harlem, No. 3, 1963p. 317
61 Langston Hughes: He Spoke of Rivers, No. 2, 1968p. 321
62 An Old Woman Remembers, No. 3, 1963p. 324
63 A Letter from Brooklyn, No. 3, 1964p. 326
64 Poems of Agostinho Neto, No. 1, 1976p. 328
65 Eventide, Kumasi, No. 2, 1970p. 330
Fiction and Drama
66 We Are of the Same Sidewalks, No. 3, 1980p. 331
67 Lorraine Hansberry: On Time! No. 4, 1979p. 335
68 The Once and Future Vision of Lorraine Hansberry, No. 4, 1979p. 340
69 At the Emmy Time! No. 1, 1980p. 345
70 The Welcome Table: A Short Story, No. 3, 1970p. 349
71 The First Day (A Fable After Brown): A Short Story, No. 4, 1974p. 354
72 A Review of God's Bits of Wood by Ousmane Sembene, No. 2, 1978p. 357
Music
73 Jazz, No. 2, 1962p. 360
74 Black Women Singers-Artists, No. 1, 1966p. 364
75 Will Jazz Survive? Thoughts on the State of the Great American Art, No. 4, 1983p. 368
76 Martin Luther King: A Personal Tribute, No. 1, 1972p. 378
Afterwordp. 380