Cover image for Carnivorous plants
Title:
Carnivorous plants
Author:
Camilleri, Tony.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
East Roseville, N.S.W. : Kangaroo Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
104 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 28 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780864179173

9780684871998
Format :
Book

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QK917 .C35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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QK917 .C35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QK917 .C35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QK917 .C35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QK917 .C35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Of all the groups in the plant kingdom, it is carnivorous plants which hold the greatest fascination. Tony Camilleri describes exactly what carnivorous plants are, why they capture insects, the types of traps the use to catch their prey and an interesting history of their evolution. 100 color plates illustrate this strange group which includes such plants as the water wheel plant, which feeds on insects in the water, the cobra lily, which resembles a cobra about to strike its prey, the tropical pitcher plants of which the largest species is known to have captured rats. There's practical advice on how to grow plants at home, in the terrarium or around the pond. A comprehensive list of carnivorous plant societies and growers and suppliers from around the world is included, as well as a complete listing and description of every carnivorous plant.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

The term carnivorous plant was first applied in 1760 to the Venus's-flytraps native to North Carolina. It was thought to be the only plant of its kind. Botanists now know of 560 species worldwide, all able to capture and devour insects. Today fewer and fewer of these plants can be found in the wild. In more than 100 color illustrations, Camilleri records the beauty, color, and shapes of 11 species. The author explains how each species captures its prey, and gives detailed information on plant care, dormancy periods, and reproduction. In the introduction, Camilleri discusses evolution, and later he offers ideas on creating an outdoor or indoor carnivorous home garden. Pest and disease control are reviewed. A comprehensive listing in an appendix provides details on basic growth characteristics of each species. --George Cohen