Cover image for You don't have to be thin to win : the official Chub Club Coach's workout program
Title:
You don't have to be thin to win : the official Chub Club Coach's workout program
Author:
Molnar, Judy, 1965-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Villard Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xii, 180 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Title Subject:
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ISBN:
9780375504143
Format :
Book

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RA778 .M687 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In January 1996, Judy Molnar was six foot one, weighed 330 pounds, and was a size 26W. She didn't own a bike or a swimsuit. At her annual physical, after hearing the doctor's usual sermon about her weight, she accidentally saw the phrase "morbidly obese" written on her chart. Only then did Judy realize that she had to take some action or she might not be around for her next yearly exam. And on that day she set out to learn how to eat, exercise, and get into shape.         Having tried all of the traditional starve-yourself, go-for-the-burn programs that just left her drained and in pain (and ultimately made her eat more), Judy knew that she was going to have to create a program that worked for her. Over the course of two and a half years, through working with coaches, nutritionists, and trainers, she developed an incredible program that has helped her lose 130 pounds and 12 clothing sizes. In 1999, she even completed one of the most strenuous sporting events: the World Ironman Triathlon Championship in Hawaii. Television host Rosie O'Donnell heard about Judy's commitment to a healthy lifestyle and invited her to come on the show to share her story. Rosie was so inspired by her message--"Eat less and move more" --that she created a position for Judy on her show by making her the Official Chub Club Coach.         You Don't Have to Be Thin to Win is Judy's special recipe for health and fitness. She shows you everything from how to buy sneakers and how to find a way to move that works for your body and your time constraints to how to get through a grocery store and come out with foods that will make you a winner. And Judy is inspiring: Even if you feel that getting your body in shape is impossible, her story and many of the poignant success stories from her work as the Official Chub Club Coach will get you off the couch and moving. Judy's story and this program demonstrate that anyone--no matter what size, shape, or age--can lose weight and become healthy to enjoy a richer, fuller, and more active life. Not just another fitness book "In 1996, I got scared. I went to the doctor and learned that I was no longer fat, I was 'morbidly obese.' This was no longer about a dress size; this was life and death. And so I began an extraordinary journey from being a 330-pound sedentary woman who ate five or six doughnuts for breakfast to losing 130 pounds, getting fit enough to compete in the World Ironman Championship Triathlon in Hawaii, and becoming the Official Chub Club Coach for The Rosie O'Donnell Show. While I might not fit the conventional image of an athlete or fitness expert, I am healthy and hap-pier than I've ever been. I wrote this book for people who, like me, have tried every program from A to Z--diets, gyms, trainers --and are looking for real and realistic results. You Don't Have to Be Thin to Win tells my story, illustrates my program (the only one that has ever worked for me), and shows you how you, too, can win your health and life back."                 Judy Molnar                 Official Chub Club Coach


Excerpts

Excerpts

How Did I Get Here?: The Story of How I Went from Fat to Fit What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us. -Ralph Waldo Emerson How does someone go from a volleyball scholarship to Clemson to morbidly obese in the span of about seven years? Well, it didn't take just seven years. It took a lifetime. As a youngster growing up in Indiana, I never thought of myself as big and tall. I remember writing a paper on Babe Didrikson in grammar school. She was amazing-a track-and-field star and a great golfer. It seems she could do anything she wanted whenever she wanted. And she was big. I was already big for my age, so I could relate. People started calling me "Babe." I liked that. I thought big was a go d thing, something to aspire to. I was a big girl, but I wasn't the tubby kid who was abused throughout school. I just had a large frame. I didn't hide out. People always thought I was older because I was tall. I did it all: snowball wars and sports with the guys; playing Barbies in the afternoon. The summer after sixth grade, I worked at Camp Millhouse, a summer camp for physically and mentally challenged kids. The girl who brought me to the camp couldn't stand being there and left after three days. I worked there for three summers. At first, I was a counselor-in-training, but by the second summer I was leading groups and had all the responsibilities of a full-fledged counselor. I loved every single minute of it. These kids needed me. To make an autistic child laugh or put a smile on a sad child's face made the experience special. The age range was from kindergarten through adult. Even early on, I had as much responsibility as the high school kids. I think it was because I was so tall that I looked mature. Again, I perceived big as a positive state. In eighth grade, I was the only girl on the boys' baseball team, although I got into only two games and spent more time keeping score than actually wearing a glove or swinging a bat. But I was on the team, and it was an honor. We moved to Granger, a community outside South Bend, Indiana, that year. Life was good. I had nicknames in high school-"Magilla Gorilla," "Grape Ape," "Too Tall Jones"-but I never found them offensive. In ninth grade, one of my teammates started calling me "BJ," or "Big Judy." It had a nice ring to it. To me there wasn't anything negative about it. These were MY friends. I wanted to be a better basketball player. Since I was living in South Bend, the home of Notre Dame, I started watching the Notre Dame basketball team practice. I became an instant fan. Every day I watched and learned from coach Digger Phelps. The practices were closed to the public, but Digger let me sit in. I played varsity sports, studied drama, and sang in the choir. I had a ton of friends, and not once do I remember anyone calling me fat. Dating? We all went out as a group, and the boys and girls group-danced together. We even invented are own weekend court dances on the campus of Notre Dame. We took a boom box and went out and danced. I didn't have a special boyfriend, but I always had a secret crush on one of my best friends, Jim. I never felt left out. I even went to my senior prom with Jim, and we had the time of our lives. Sixteen Steps for Getting Ready to Get into the Game Your thoughts determine your actions. Your actions determine your habits. Your habits determine your character, and your character gives birth to your destiny. --UNKNOWN Chapters 2-11 focus on helping you move more, and Chapters 12-17 show you how to eat better. The process of making changes in your life is just that-a process. When faced with the opportunity to make positive changes in your life, it helps to give some thought to developing a strategy to make those changes happen. Like everyone who wants to improve his or her health, there are two areas that I had to focus on changing when I made a decision to get healthy: exercise and diet. I looked at my life as a teeter-totter, and my job was to stop the bouncing up and down and create a balance. I'm not talking only about the weight highs and lows. I'm also talking about the mental ups and downs. For me, balance meant not only improving the physical but also developing a spiritual and mental self. You might see this as heart, body, and mind. I had known the many ups and downs of dieting. I knew that to succeed, I had to focus my attention inward to get myself in balance. I even came up with a motto, "Finding It My Way." Then I took a few steps toward making changes. Those changes took time, but I took it step by step. You can "find it your way" by following these practical steps. Finding Your Way One:  Become aware. I had to become aware of where I came from, then figure out where I needed to go. This meant taking a good, honest look at myself-the things I did and why I did them, both positive and negative. What was working in my life and what was not? I started this process by taking time to write and reflect on how I was going to make some changes in my life. One of the first things I did was write down some of the things that I needed to work and focus on. You don't have to write a lot-sometimes just a few words will say all you need to say. I jotted down a quick list that included the following: ¸  Do it for me. ¸  Admit fears. ¸  Concentrate on the small steps. ¸  Surround myself with supportive people. ¸  Admit it's okay to slip. ¸  Self-care is not being selfish. ¸  Share vulnerability ¸  Be committed. ¸  Trust myself and others. ¸  Add structure to my life. ¸  Focus on the positive. ¸  Be responsible to myself. ¸  Forgive myself. From there, I wrote a list of things to do. ¸  Running ¸  Weight training ¸  Doing new things ¸  Playing volleyball ¸  Taking a wellness class ¸  Going to church ¸  Reading motivational books ¸  Eating for me ¸  Creating a new lifestyle of my own I remember one time I wrote down more than three hundred things that I wanted to accomplish in my life. I wrote down everything I ever thought I might want to do-from traveling and attending a Broadway show to flossing and not counting myself out. I still have that list, and I look at it every once in a while to keep me focused on new goals. If you have a minute, start making of list of things you want to accomplish in life-no matter how far out of reach they seem to be. After all, without a dream, your spirit will die. Two:  Review what got you to this point. This can be tough to admit, but I believe I always knew what 1 needed to change in my life; I just had to take the time to face it head-on. Before you can make any changes, you have to learn to accept yourself for who you are. This is the most crucial step. Talking to close friends and family-and listening to what they have to say, even if you don't want to hear it-may give you a clearer perspective on your life. Try to talk to people who care about you and are supportive. Bottom line: I couldn't do it alone. I talked to a close friend, Rob-who is one of the most outgoing and goal oriented people I have ever met-about what things he thought I should change about myself. He never said, "Lose weight." He did say I needed a consistent, positive attitude. He said I should work more on it. He told me that it is so easy to get up each morning and be negative but that it takes work to be positive. He gave me an immediate example of my negativity: I had started our conversation that day by saying, "I'm in a good mood, but it won't last long." Negativity was a real crutch for me, enabling my eating habits and poor fitness: "I can't go to a gym because I'm too big." Rob told me to refuse to allow the environment around me to affect my attitude, to control what I can and let the rest go. That's a tall order. My boss would rail me for whatever was bothering him that day, and I would take it in and then eat myself through it, rather than confronting him with how he vented his frustrations on me or accepting that the problem was his, not mine. Rob also told me to lighten up, that I needed to have more fun, enjoy the present moment, and be a bit more spontaneous. Everything-down to when I brushed my teeth-was planned. He said that if I was stressed so much by others and by planning for the future, there would be no time to enjoy me. Essentially, I had to be with myself twenty-four hours a day. I found that writing in a journal helped me work through my thoughts and deal with the issues of the day. I could see myself on the page. Three: Set goals. Don't take a cookie-cutter approach to this process. Your goals are not the same as mine or anyone else's. Your situation is not the same as anyone else's. You are not the same as anyone else. Don't even imagine that anyone else's plan for reaching his or her goals is going to be the same as yours. Give yourself some leeway. The ideas presented here are meant as a guide, not as a set of hard-and-fast rules. Pick and choose the ones that appeal to you, then use them to create a structure that works for you and makes you happy. A goal isn't a goal until you put it down on paper, say it out loud, learn it by heart. Make it into a poster or sampler, or just write it on a piece of paper and tape it to your bathroom mirror, your dashboard, or your refrigerator door-someplace where you will see it every day. Four:  Be realistic. That doesn't mean you shouldn't have big goals. It does mean you should give yourself the time and resources you need to reach them. Set yourself up for success, not failure. In 1992, 1 wrote, "I am going to lose forty pounds by the end of the summer and, if I keep going, one hundred pounds by Christmas." Wow! That was a lot of weight to lose in less than six months. Not realistic-and not healthy. Try not to think in terms of pounds lost but rather in terms of health gained. Visit a doctor. Okay, you've heard this a million times: you really need a doctor's assessment of your health and fitness. Doctors can take tests to determine things such as blood pressure, cholesterol, heart and thyroid condition, and more. Talk to your doctor about your plans for a new lifestyle. He or she may set limits on your activities or make suggestions about the best kinds of exercise for you. But don't rely on a doctor for nutritional and weight-loss advice unless he or she is experienced in this area. A coworker went to her doctor because she thought she was gaining too much weight and didn't know why. She had a thyroid test, which came back negative. The doctor told her to eat no more than a thousand calories a day, and she would lose weight. He offered no support or education as to what she should do, just slapped her with a calorie-counting diet plan. She later admitted to me that she did know why she was gaining so much: she was eating fast food all the time, and whenever she was stressed at work, she went to the candy machine. She made a change in her life. She quit her job after years of using food to deal with the stress. She has lost weight and is really getting control of her life now. Five:  Make it personal. Your mother may have goals for you, but that's her problem. Be honest about what you want. I tried to follow the Oprah way of going after a marathon. I was going after her dreams and goals, doing it her way, not mine. When I started doing the exercises I liked, I was led to doing triathlons. Triathlons encompass several exercises, they are social, and they required a lot of learning, which kept me interested day in and day out. Don't let your goal be dependent on someone else. Their failure then becomes your failure, your excuse. Six:  Set a time frame. A deadline is always a good motivator. Do a little research.. Find out how long it took other people to reach the same goal. Sit down with a calendar and plot out steps along the way. When I decided to do a 5K, I reviewed a lot of training programs to find one that matched my goals, fitness level, and time available to train. I read articles by running experts that gave advice on training to help me establish when I could realistically expect to be ready. Seven:  Set little goats that lead to bigger goals. Small steps will take you to the end of the road just as big steps will-and do it a lot easier. You don't go from to the couch to the finish line overnight. And if you try you risk frustration, burnout, and injury. When I decided to do a 5K, my first step was to see how far I could walk. Then I set up a plan to walk three times that week. Each time I walked, I went a little farther, building on each success, minute by minute. Consider a nutritionist. One of the best things I did was attend a wellness class taught by a nutritionist. This was the first time that I focused on wellness, not just a diet plan. To find a registered dietitian in your area, check the American Dietetic Association website at www.eatright.org, or call (800) 366-1655. Eight:  Share your goals and hopes with others. Tell everyone, "I'm going to run a 5k next September." (or whatever your goal is). People can't help you unless they know what you're trying to do, and you'll be surprised at the help and support you get. Moreover, we all make promises to ourselves, but when we tell someone else, we become accountable. Nine:  Figure out what you need to reach your goal, then go out and get it. Seek out information, support, and people who can direct and guide you. Take a look around your community to find programs, health clubs, and wellness groups that can help you. In the Appendix, I list some websites that can help, too. One of my favorites is PHYS, www.phys.com, which has some cool on-line calculators to help you figure out calories burned, ideal weight, calories required, and more. Ten:  Visualize it. I learned that if I saw myself as successful, I would be successful. It's a mental game of imagining what you want to do, seeing yourself doing it, feeling how it feels to have done it, and then trying it in real life. Eleven:  Easy does it, but do it. You can spend a lot of time thinking about the changes you want to make. Heck, you can spend so much time thinking about it that you never do anything. Set a time limit for this step. There are just two rules to follow: no negative thinking ("I can't do that") and no procrastination. Get clear on what you want to do, then do it. It takes courage and support to go after any goal. The key is to take steps forward--even if your goal is to buy a pair of sneakers so that you can join a gym. You just have to keep working toward your goal. You may have to try different routes until you find one that clicks for you-something you enjoy, something fun, something that you'll stick with until you get where you want to go. For instance, I tried the personal trainer route and didn't find complete success because I was focusing only on losing weight and the physical aspects of health. I also tried structured diets time and again, but I always failed because I didn't have a realistic outlook. Then I started walking and found that it got me moving with out adding too much stress to my body. Later I started playing volleyball at the health club. For me, volleyball is a fun activity that got me moving more, and I enjoyed the social aspects of playing with a team. It's easier if you approach your goal one small step at a time, celebrate each step you take, and move on to the next one. And remember, rather than celebrating your success with food or a day off, do something that brings you closer your goal. Twelve:  Make it yours. Here is where I finally started to take responsibility for what I had done and what I was doing to make positive changes in my life. For example, I kept my exercise log at hand so that I could continue to track and record my progress. I noted all the positive changes I experienced. By setting goals and plans and I had begun to make the process mine. Now, keeping tabs on my progress, I became accountable only to myself Look around and dig deep to find out what you want to do with your life. Don't follow someone else exactly, but use other people's experiences as inspiration and a guide to get where you want to go. Thirteen:  Track your goals and progress. When you set a goal, make sure there's a way to measure your progress and a way to tell when you've reached it. This means make it concrete, such as "I will walk three miles by January I" or "I will attend a masters swim class twice a week for the next six months." I use an exercise log to record my schedule for each week, then I write in what I did and comment on each day. On those days when I feel as if I'm getting nowhere, I look back over my log, and I get a big boost from seeing how much progress I've made and how I'm building a foundation of health and fitness. Fourteen:  Reward yourself each time you reach a goal. Make sure it's a positive reward, not a negative one. Get out of the habit of using food as a reward. Do something good for yourself-a manicure or pedicure, a massage, a new outfit, a long-distance call to Mom. One of my friends got new skis when she completed her first race. Hey, why not? Having something to look forward to can keep you moving toward your goal. Fifteen:  Keep your goals current. Your goals may change. That's okay; it just means you re getting in touch with what you really want. You may not be making much progress toward your goals, which means you need to try another direction or deal with an obstacle you hadn't anticipated. Set new goals as soon as you reach your old ones, so you're always looking ahead, working for something positive in your life. When you've reached a goal, take a look at your log or journal. Try to spot the problems you had and come up with ways to avoid them next time around. I found that certain patterns developed when I missed a workout, so I started planning better for those times. If I had a meeting scheduled for late in the day at the office, there was a chance it would run over into my aerobics class. Realizing this had happened in the past, I would plan a morning workout on days when I had late meetings scheduled. Dealing with potential problems ahead of time requires flexibility, but it keeps you from getting off track. Sixteen:  Live it. It's that simple-and that hard. This is the part that takes patience and commitment to yourself and your goals. You can spend all the time in the world talking and writing about what you want to do, but there comes a time when you have to take action. There are ups and downs on the path of realizing your goal to get healthy. Take the time to learn from this journey. You will experience so much by actually living out your dreams. A Final Thought: Be Proactive The hardest part of making healthy lifestyle changes could be making yourself talk to others. Surround yourself with people who support you and are likeminded in terms of reaching for goals and pursuing a healthy lifestyle. I have a very supportive family and boyfriend who are there for me in success or failure. If you don't have people in your life who are good for you, get out and meet some. Talk to people at your health club. Talk to people you see when you're out walking. Introduce yourself. Be friendly, be open about your goals, and don't be afraid to ask for help. That's what the Chub Club is all about-providing a supportive community. Let the people in your life help. I found that I was not alone with my weight and health issues. I sat in a wellness class with thirty other women trying to get control of some of their unhealthy habits. I also talked to a nutritionist. I found a coach. I started reading books. I started making small changes and made sure to share them with those close to me. I found that many people are available to help, but first you need to learn how to help yourself. That is where being proactive about your health comes into play. You have to make it happen. We all know what we need to do, but it takes will, determination, and even courage to face yourself and others and to begin to make changes. Most important, remember that you are not alone. Excerpted from You Don't Have to Be Thin to Win: The Official Chub Club Coach's Workout Program by Judy Molnar All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.