Cover image for Mrs. Pollifax unveiled
Title:
Mrs. Pollifax unveiled
Author:
Gilman, Dorothy, 1923-2012.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Ballantine Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
195 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
870 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6.2 8.0 66939.

Reading Counts RC High School 7.6 12 Quiz: 20471 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780345436528
Format :
Book

Available:*

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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

Seven weeks ago, a young American woman, Amanda Pym, faced down hijackers on board a flight to the Middle East and saved the lives of more than 200 passengers. In a blaze of celebrity, she stepped off the plane in Damascus and was whisked away in a waiting car. Since then - nothing. The CIA believes she was kidnapped and murdered.


Author Notes

Dorothy Gilman was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey on June 25, 1923. She studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Under her married name, Dorothy Gilman Butters, she began publishing children's books in the late 1940s including Enchanted Caravan and The Bells of Freedom. In 1966, she published The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax, which became the first novel in the Mrs. Pollifax Mystery series. The series concluded in 2000 with Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled. The series was the basis of two movies: the 1971 feature film Mrs. Pollifax - Spy starring Rosalind Russell and the 1999 television movie The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax starring Angela Lansbury. Her other works include The Clairvoyant Countess, Incident at Badamya and Kaleidoscope. A Nun in the Closet won a Catholic Book Award. She died due to complications of Alzheimer's disease on February 2, 2012 at the age of 88.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

It is so soothing to be in Emily Pollifax's presence: we know that, at any time, she may leave her tidy existence in Connecticut (complete with geraniums and an understanding husband) and venture forth, with manners and nerves of steel, to do whatever the CIA has planned for her. This time, with her rakish cohort Farrell, she's sent to Syria. An American girl named Amanda Pym has faced down a handful of skyjacking terrorists and then vanished. Mrs. P and Farrell track Amanda down with the barest of clues, through souks and tourist destinations, through the desert and an archaeological dig where an earnest young professor named Joe manages to assist with borrowed vehicles, large numbers of sheep, and other tools. It's wonderful to watch Mrs. Pollifax manage it all with clear thinking and the midlife woman's ability to fade into the scenery as someone's aunt or mum. Along the way, there's lots of local color, a bit of politics, useful phrases in Arabic, and some really elegant use of ancient Babylonian verse. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Library Journal Review

Mrs. Emily Reed-Pollifax, grandmother, flower-arranger, and part-time CIA agent, is back in the Middle East. A young American has disappeared in Syria, and she has been sent to find her. After all, shortly before she vanished, Amanda Pym saved a whole airline full of people from hijackers. Accompanied by her favorite colleague, John Sebastian Farrell, Mrs. Pollifax visits an archaeological dig, explores the desert, and finds her woman. Gilman has been writing this series for more than 30 years, and Mrs. Pollifax is not quite the same, sweet old lady she once was. Who can resist a woman who alternates garden club meetings with karate lessons, makes lifelong friends wherever she goes, and invariably is able to transfer the contents of a large purse into the pockets or sleeves of any ethnic costume? Overall, this is a very relaxed, cohesive reading by Sharon Williams, only disrupted by the slightly jarring incidental music that begins and ends each side. The "cozy" spy thriller may be a nearly dead subgenre, but Mrs. Pollifax's circulation figures remain healthy. Recommended for all moderate to large popular fiction collections.DI. Pour-El, Des Moines Area Community Coll. Lib., Boone, IA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Mrs. Pollifax was feeling bored and rather left out of life. Cyrus had re-cently accepted an invitation to teach law three days a week at the university; he was hugely enjoying it. "Damned good to feel so useful again," he'd admitted, and she was glad for him. She, however, was not feeling particularly useful. She reminded herself that she was still growing prizewinning geraniums, was in excel-lent health, hoped soon to earn her black belt in karate, and remained a faithful member of the Save Our Environment club. But . . . How spoiled I am, she thought. For a woman of what was delicately referred to as "of a certain age" she ought to feel fortunate indeed, and yet . . . She realized that she was absentmindedly scratching her left arm from which, not long ago, a bullet had been removed in a Bedouin tent by a man named Bushaq, and she concluded that what she was experiencing was letdown. The price one pays, she thought sadly, for venturing out into dangerous worlds for Carstairs and the CIA, only to return to errands at the grocery store and bank, cooking and cleaning, mulch-ing her garden for the winter, and pampering her geraniums. Across the breakfast table from her, almost hidden behind his newspaper, Cyrus glanced up and saw the gesture toward her arm. "Still hurting?" he asked. "Do wish you'd let Dr. Orton have a look at that." He hesitated, and then, "Damn good to have you safe at home again, Em," and as he said this the telephone rang. He put down his cup of coffee, reached across his briefcase and newspaper, and when he answered it she saw his face change. Handing the phone to her he said, "It's Bishop." "Oh," she said, startled, and concealing her reaction she kept her voice casual. "Bishop, how good to hear from you, are you well?" Bishop, however, was not interested in polite conversation. He said bluntly, "Have any important plans for this day?" "No," she said, honestly enough. "A car will pick you up in forty minutes at your house," he said. "Carstairs wants to talk with you. Oh, and you might bring your pass-port with you, just in case." And he hung up. "Emily," said her husband warningly. "He just wants to talk with me," she told him. "Hard to believe," growled Cyrus. "You haven't even been home long enough for that arm to heal." "It's healed," she told him. "It just itches." He gave her a rueful smile. "I know, I know--I promised never to interfere, but still I don't like the sound of that call." With a glance at the clock on the wall he added, "And now I've got to go or I'll miss my first class, but Em--nothing dangerous, promise?" He knew, of course, that anything Carstairs might have in mind could be dangerous; after all, she and Cyrus had met in Zambia under very dangerous circumstances and they had survived by luck and ingenuity. Cyrus had gone with her to Thailand, too, where he'd been snatched away from her by bandits, but she did not think it wise to remind him of this, nor to mention that Bishop had asked her to bring her passport. Instead she said tactfully, with a bright smile, "Barbecued chicken for dinner tonight," and when he had gone she hurried upstairs to dress for her trip to CIA headquarters. From the Paperback edition. Excerpted from Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled by Dorothy Gilman All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.