Cover image for E-Commerce systems architecture and applications
Title:
E-Commerce systems architecture and applications
Author:
Rajput, Wasim E.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston, Mass. : Artech House, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xix, 422 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9781580530859
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This text presents a survey of the tools and technologies used for building an e-commerce system. It explores the various types of commercial transactions - business to business, business to consumer and intra-business - and examines the impact e-commerce has on an enterprise's IT strategy.


Author Notes

Wasim Rajput received his M.S. in Electrical/Computer Engineering from Drexel University, and his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering.

Rajput is an Information Technology Architect.

050


Table of Contents

Prefacep. XV
1 E-Commerce-Enabled Business Paradigmp. 1
1.1 E-Commerce Business Driversp. 2
1.2 E-Commerce Value Propositionsp. 4
1.2.1 Customer-Oriented Propositionsp. 5
1.2.2 Organizational Efficienciesp. 10
1.2.3 Revenue Generationp. 12
1.3 E-Commerce-Driven IT Strategy Realignmentp. 13
1.3.1 Formulating E-Commerce System Requirementsp. 14
1.3.2 Instituting IT Processesp. 16
1.3.3 Operational Infrastructurep. 18
1.3.4 Intraorganization IT and Business Alignmentp. 19
1.3.5 Formulating a Technology Architecturep. 20
1.3.6 Intelligently Embracing the E-Commerce Glutp. 22
1.4 Characteristics of E-Commerce Systemsp. 22
1.4.1 Functional Characteristicsp. 23
1.4.2 Infrastructural Characteristicsp. 27
1.5 E-Commerce Business Domains and Respective E-Commerce Systems Requirementsp. 30
1.5.1 Business-to-Consumer Application Domainp. 30
1.5.2 Intraenterprise Application Domainp. 33
1.5.3 Business-to-Business Application Domainp. 34
1.6 E-Commerce Technology Architecturep. 36
2 Information Appliancesp. 41
2.1 Overview and Backgroundp. 42
2.1.1 Services Provided by Information Appliancesp. 44
2.2 Enabling Characteristics of Information Appliancesp. 46
2.3 E-Commerce Contentp. 51
2.3.1 Understanding Contentp. 52
2.3.2 Content Handlersp. 55
2.3.3 Content Technologiesp. 57
2.4 Choice of Information Appliancesp. 64
2.4.1 Wireless Telephonesp. 64
2.4.2 Pagersp. 66
2.4.3 PCs/Workstationsp. 67
2.4.4 Handheld PCs (HPCs)p. 68
2.4.5 Set-Top Boxes/Internet Receiversp. 69
2.4.6 Network Computersp. 71
2.4.7 AutoPCp. 72
2.5 Information Appliance System Software and Technologiesp. 72
2.5.1 Operating Systems and Environmentsp. 73
2.5.2 Information Appliance Connectivity Technologiesp. 78
2.6 Matching Information Appliance Features With Business Process Requirementsp. 81
2.6.1 Requirements Analysisp. 82
2.6.2 Business Process Considerationsp. 86
2.6.3 Technology Infrastructure Considerationsp. 89
3 E-Commerce Systems Computing Networksp. 93
3.1 Network Computing Technologiesp. 95
3.1.1 Wireline Technologiesp. 97
3.1.2 Wireless Technologiesp. 101
3.2 Internet Backbonep. 103
3.2.1 Internet Network Topologyp. 107
3.2.2 Internet Network Servicesp. 110
3.3 Wireless Network Backbonesp. 115
3.3.1 Wireless Topologyp. 117
3.3.2 Wireless Network Servicesp. 121
3.4 Paging Network Backbonep. 123
3.4.1 Paging Network Topologyp. 125
3.4.2 Paging Network Servicesp. 127
3.5 Integrated Network Servicesp. 129
3.5.1 Sprint's Integrated On-Demand Network (ION)p. 130
3.5.2 Wireless Knowledge Servicesp. 131
3.6 Formulating the Enterprise Virtual Network Architecturep. 132
3.6.1 E-Commerce Systems' Network Requirements Assessmentp. 133
3.6.2 NSP/ISP Selection Criteriap. 145
4 E-Commerce Services and Application Repositoriesp. 147
4.1 Application Access Gatewaysp. 153
4.1.1 Web Serversp. 153
4.1.2 Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Gatewaysp. 155
4.1.3 Internet Telephony Gatewaysp. 156
4.1.4 Wireless Gateways for Web Accessp. 156
4.1.5 E-Mail Gatewaysp. 157
4.1.6 Webcastingp. 158
4.2 E-Commerce Solutionsp. 159
4.2.1 E-Commerce Applicationsp. 160
4.2.2 E-Commerce Business Standardsp. 164
4.3 Enabling ERP Systems and Legacy Applications for E-Commercep. 166
4.3.1 Web-Enabling Backend Systemsp. 167
4.3.2 Enabling Backend Systems for Nonbrowser-Based Accessp. 169
4.4 Knowledge Repositoriesp. 172
4.4.1 Identification of Knowledge and Content Sourcesp. 174
4.4.2 Knowledge Capturep. 175
4.4.3 Knowledge Organization and Accessp. 177
4.4.4 Using Search Engines for Knowledge Retrievalp. 180
4.5 Live Agent Servicesp. 183
4.5.1 Enabling Call Centers for Various Electronic Channelsp. 184
4.5.2 Establish Call Routing Infrastructurep. 189
4.5.3 Empowering Service Representatives With Appropriate Tools and Informationp. 190
5 Establishing E-Commerce Application Access Infrastructurep. 193
5.1 Extranetsp. 194
5.1.1 Classification of Extranetsp. 198
5.1.2 Development and Deployment of Extranetsp. 201
5.2 Applications Access Through Portalsp. 205
5.2.1 Classification of Portalsp. 207
5.2.2 Development of Portalsp. 210
5.3 E-Commerce Systems Operational Management and Controlp. 211
5.3.1 Network and Systems Management Issuesp. 215
5.3.2 Standards and Technologiesp. 218
5.3.3 Formulating an E-Commerce Operational Management Strategyp. 223
5.4 E-Commerce Hostingp. 226
6 E-Commerce Systems Technology Infrastructurep. 231
6.1 E-Commerce Systems Middlewarep. 232
6.1.1 Middleware Frameworksp. 234
6.1.2 Transaction Processing Middlewarep. 238
6.1.3 Communication Middlewarep. 240
6.1.4 Database Middlewarep. 242
6.1.5 Application Middlewarep. 243
6.2 Directory Services: Glue for E-Commerce Systemsp. 246
6.2.1 Centralization of Directory Services Through Metadirectoriesp. 249
6.2.2 Directory Services Requirements for E-Commerce Systemsp. 251
6.2.3 Popular Directory Servicesp. 252
6.3 Internet Domain Name Service (DNS)p. 256
6.3.1 DNS Structurep. 257
6.3.2 History of DNS Operations and Organization Controlp. 259
6.3.3 Future Directions for DNS Operationsp. 260
6.4 Enabling Groupware for E-Commerce and the Internetp. 263
6.4.1 Group Communicationsp. 266
6.4.2 Group Information Sharing and Collaborationp. 270
6.4.3 Workflowp. 272
6.5 E-Commerce Application Development Standardsp. 276
6.5.1 Java Servletsp. 277
6.5.2 Enterprise Java Beans (EJB)p. 277
6.5.3 Active Server Pages (ASP)p. 278
6.5.4 Java Server Pages (JSP)p. 279
7 The E-Commerce Payment Infrastructurep. 281
7.1 Federal Reserve Systemp. 283
7.1.1 Automated Clearing House (ACH)p. 283
7.1.2 Fedwirep. 285
7.2 Credit Card Paymentsp. 285
7.2.1 Credit Card Process Flowp. 286
7.2.2 Secure Socket Layer (SSL)-Based Internet Paymentsp. 288
7.2.3 Secure Electronic Transactions (SET)-Based Internet Paymentsp. 289
7.3 Electronic Cashp. 295
7.3.1 Mondexp. 296
7.3.2 VISA Cashp. 299
7.4 Electronic Check Processing and ATM-Based Bankingp. 299
7.4.1 Check Processing Flowp. 300
7.4.2 FSTC Electronic Checkp. 302
7.4.3 ATMsp. 304
7.5 Payment Modelsp. 306
7.5.1 Electronic Walletsp. 306
7.5.2 Electronic Bill Presentment and Payment (EBPP)p. 308
8 E-Commerce Systems Securityp. 315
8.1 Security Services and Technologiesp. 317
8.1.1 Confidentialityp. 317
8.1.2 Access Controlp. 320
8.1.3 Integrityp. 323
8.1.4 Availabilityp. 323
8.1.5 Nonrepudiationp. 323
8.2 Network Securityp. 323
8.2.1 Network Security Technologiesp. 325
8.2.2 Security for Various Network Topologiesp. 331
8.3 Platform Securityp. 337
8.3.1 Establishing Controls for Platform Accessp. 338
8.3.2 Proper Configuration of the Computing Platformp. 339
8.3.3 Protecting the Integrity of Platform Applications and Datap. 340
8.4 The Certificate Authority (CA) Infrastructurep. 341
8.4.1 Public CA Servicesp. 345
8.4.2 Registration Authorities (RAs)p. 347
8.4.3 Building Internal PKI Servicesp. 348
8.5 E-Commerce Systems Security--Cost and Risk Assessmentp. 349
8.5.1 Information Security-Related Costsp. 350
8.5.2 Information Security Risk Assessmentp. 353
8.6 E-Commerce Systems Security Controls Enforcementp. 357
8.6.1 Formulating an Enterprise's Information Security Policyp. 357
8.6.2 Controlling Software Processesp. 359
8.6.3 Formulating Security Administration Processesp. 361
9 Managing E-Commerce Systems Implementation Risksp. 363
9.1 Business Process Alignmentp. 364
9.1.1 E-Commerce-Relevant Organizational Policiesp. 364
9.1.2 Measuring Business Performancep. 367
9.2 IT Process Alignmentp. 371
9.2.1 E-Commerce Project Managementp. 375
9.2.2 Software Product Engineeringp. 376
9.2.3 Intergroup Coordinationp. 378
9.3 Capturing and Retaining Customersp. 379
9.3.1 Internet Advertisingp. 380
9.3.2 Customer Retentionp. 384
9.4 Using SLAs to Manage Outsourced Servicesp. 388
9.4.1 ISP/NSP/Data Center SLAsp. 391
9.4.2 Software Development SLAsp. 393
9.5 Understanding E-Commerce Legal and Regulatory Issuesp. 395
9.5.1 E-Commerce Privacy Issuesp. 395
9.5.2 E-Commerce Piracy Issuesp. 398
Indexp. 403