Cover image for Component-based network system engineering
Title:
Component-based network system engineering
Author:
Norris, Mark.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Artech House, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xix, 380 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781580530088

9780580530081
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A guide to building component-based systems combining hardware, software and network elements in a predictable, competent way. It explains interfaces, integration, components and architectures, how they relate, and what combinations and approaches will yield the best results for your organization's needs. It offers advice on building systems based on real-world experience and solid network engineering theory, without getting bogged down in technological complexity. In addition to this overview, the book covers how to avoid expensive mistakes when you design, build or implement a networked system in a sea of competing hardware, software and components.


Author Notes

Mark Norris is a technical director of Norwest Communications, Suffolk, UK. He is the author of Mobile IP Technology for M-Business (Artech House, 2001), Understanding Networking Technology: Concepts: Terms, and Trends, Second Edition (Artech House, 1999) and Survival in the Software Jungle (Artech House, 1995); the co-editor of Systems Modeling for Business Process Improvement (Artech House, 2000); and the co-author of Component-Based Network System Engineering (Artech House, 2000).

050


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xvii
A User's Guide to This Bookp. xviii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
1 At the Edge of Communicationp. 1
A Global Issuep. 2
Some Basic Definitionsp. 3
An Interfacep. 3
Some Types of Interfacep. 4
Why Interfaces Matterp. 5
Interfaces Enable Integrationp. 6
Plug and Play?p. 7
The Real Worldp. 8
Tools for Integrationp. 9
About This Bookp. 10
Summaryp. 11
Selected Bibliographyp. 11
2 Interfaces and Complexityp. 13
Types of Interfacep. 14
Protocolsp. 15
Application Program Interfacep. 16
Middlewarep. 18
Remote Procedure Callp. 19
Messagingp. 20
The Right Interfacep. 20
The Design Problemp. 21
The Interface Equationp. 22
Summaryp. 24
Selected Bibliographyp. 24
3 Componentsp. 25
Components--So What Is New?p. 26
Why Use Components?p. 28
What Is a Component?p. 29
An Example: Components in Car Assemblyp. 30
What Do We Design First--System or Components?p. 32
Car Assembly Revisitedp. 33
Personal Computer Assemblyp. 36
Bits and Pieces: What Have We Learned So Farp. 37
Views of Componentsp. 39
Software Components: At Last!p. 39
Generic Types of Software Componentsp. 44
Black Box Componentsp. 44
White Box Componentsp. 45
Glass Box Componentsp. 45
Gray Box Componentsp. 46
Examples of Specific Types of Software Componentsp. 47
Procedures, Subroutines, Objects, and Class Librariesp. 47
Objects and Class Librariesp. 47
Operating Systemsp. 48
Databases and Spreadsheetsp. 48
Plugable Componentsp. 50
Logical and Physical Componentsp. 52
Why Aren't Software Components the Same as Hardware Components?p. 52
A Layered Model of Componentsp. 54
Component Technologiesp. 55
Component Object Model (COM)p. 56
Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA)p. 56
Enterprise Java Beansp. 57
Software Componentsp. 58
Mid-Tier Componentsp. 58
System-Level Componentsp. 60
Business-Level Componentsp. 63
Enterprise Componentsp. 63
Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS)p. 64
Summaryp. 65
Referencep. 67
4 Integrationp. 69
What Is Integration?p. 69
Dealing With Existing Installationsp. 70
Stovepipe Designsp. 70
Multiple Access Requirementsp. 71
Closed Interfacesp. 73
Diverse Datap. 73
Nonstandard Usersp. 74
Loose and Tight Integrationp. 74
Key Conceptsp. 75
Scrapp. 76
Trapp. 76
Mapp. 76
Wrapp. 76
Unwrapp. 77
The System Integration Processp. 78
Requirementsp. 78
Designp. 79
Developmentp. 79
Acceptancep. 83
Buildp. 83
Testp. 83
Releasep. 83
Installationp. 88
Operationp. 88
Ceasep. 88
Practical Integrationp. 88
Publish a Strategyp. 92
Define an Architecturep. 92
Define an Evolution Planp. 93
Prescribe Technologyp. 93
Summaryp. 94
Referencesp. 95
5 Architecture and Structurep. 97
Would You Buy a Car From This Man?p. 97
Sum of the Partsp. 98
Structured Flexibilityp. 101
Architecture or Design?p. 105
Architectural Stylesp. 108
Views of Viewsp. 109
Architectural Layersp. 110
Other Architectural Modelsp. 112
Layers of Generalityp. 112
Butler Modelp. 113
The Rational 4+ 1 Viewp. 114
Architectural Structuresp. 117
The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF)p. 118
Domain-Specific Architecturep. 119
Architectural Description Languagesp. 119
Structure in Architecturesp. 120
Patternsp. 120
Anti-patternsp. 123
Pattern Systems and Languagesp. 123
Frameworksp. 125
Product Lines and Product Familiesp. 128
Stovepipe Architecturesp. 130
Business Component Architecturesp. 131
Pipes, APIs, XML, and XMIp. 133
ERP Systemsp. 134
The Open Applications Group (OAG)p. 135
Business Frameworksp. 136
Business Objectsp. 138
Choosing an Architecturep. 139
Evaluating an Architecturep. 140
Using an Architecturep. 141
The Role of Architectsp. 143
The Shape of Things to Comep. 146
Summaryp. 147
Referencesp. 148
6 By Threes and Fours--Bringing It All Togetherp. 151
Motivationp. 153
The Scenariop. 164
Interfacesp. 165
Networksp. 165
Server Technologyp. 166
Desktop Technologyp. 167
Processesp. 167
Information Systems Integrationp. 168
Project Managementp. 169
Phase I Project Preparationp. 169
Phase II Solution Designp. 169
Phase III Detailed Designp. 170
Phase IV Integration and Testingp. 170
Phase V Installation and Trainingp. 170
Summaryp. 171
Referencesp. 176
7 Engineering the Visionp. 179
The Networkp. 180
LANp. 181
WANp. 184
Connection Controlp. 184
Switchingp. 186
Message Switchingp. 186
Packet Switchingp. 187
Network Architecturesp. 187
Peer-to-Peer Networksp. 187
Server-Based Networksp. 188
Network Operating Systemsp. 189
Network Applicationsp. 190
Interface Software and Standardsp. 190
Application Programming Interfacesp. 193
CORBAp. 195
Three-Tier Architecturesp. 198
DCEp. 198
COM/DCOMp. 199
What Should I Use?p. 200
Summaryp. 201
Referencesp. 202
8 Towards Component-Based Engineeringp. 203
Component-Based Developmentp. 204
System Specification, Analysis, and Designp. 205
Production Engineeringp. 222
Component Design, Building, and Procurementp. 229
Systems Assembly and Deliveryp. 237
Component Maintenancep. 242
Rapid Application Development and CBDp. 247
Methods for CBDp. 248
Structured Methodsp. 250
OO Methodsp. 252
CBD Methodsp. 253
A Generic Approach to CBDp. 257
The Need for an Overall Approachp. 257
An Experiment in Component Approachesp. 258
Case Study Resultsp. 259
A Process Framework for CBDp. 260
Butler Forum Universal Component Concepts Initiativep. 261
Describing Componentsp. 262
Repositories, Indexing, and Retrievalp. 264
Funding Component Approachesp. 265
Successful Use of Componentsp. 266
Business Issuesp. 266
Cultural Issuesp. 267
Technical Issuesp. 269
Summaryp. 270
Final Checklistp. 271
Referencesp. 272
9 Interfaces and Integration--Standards and Formalityp. 273
The Nature of Languagesp. 276
VDM Example--Creating and Removing Bank Accountsp. 276
CSP Example--A Simple Specification of the Process Diagram in Figure 9.2p. 277
Inherent Complexityp. 278
Formality and Protocolsp. 279
Formal Methodsp. 284
Summaryp. 287
Referencesp. 288
10 From Here to Eternityp. 289
Lost Horizonp. 291
Treasure Islandp. 294
Summaryp. 294
Selected Bibliographyp. 296
Appendix A The Interface Equation--A Formal Theory of Interfacesp. 297
Introductionp. 298
Formal Methodsp. 298
Solving the Interface Equationp. 300
The Discarding and Constructive Algorithmsp. 301
A Small Examplep. 307
Conclusionp. 313
Referencesp. 315
Appendix B Standards, Organizations, and Initiativesp. 317
Architectural Tradeoff Analysis (ATA) Initiativep. 317
Business Application Programming Interfaces (BAPI)p. 318
Business Object Component Architecture (BOCA)p. 318
Business Object Domain Taskforce (BODTF)p. 319
Component Definition Interchange Format (CDIF)p. 319
Component Definition Language (CDL)p. 320
COM/DCOMp. 320
CORBAp. 321
CORBA Component Modelp. 322
Distributed Computing Environment (DCE)p. 322
Department of Defense (DoD) Software Technology Programsp. 322
ESPRIT Software Evolution and Reuse (SER)p. 323
Interface Definition Language (IDL)p. 324
IEEE P1471: Recommended Practice for Architectural Descriptionp. 324
INCOSE Systems Architecture Working Groupp. 325
Microsoft Repositoryp. 325
Meta Object Facility (MOF)p. 325
NIST Advanced Technology Program--CBDp. 326
Open Applications Group Integration Specification (OAGIS)p. 326
Open Applications Group Middleware API Specification (OAMAS)p. 327
Object Management Architecture (OMA)p. 327
Object Management Group (OMG)p. 328
Open Applications Group (OAG)p. 328
Open Distributed Processing (ODP)p. 329
Open Groupp. 329
The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF)p. 330
Rational Unified Processp. 330
SEI Software Architecture Technology Initiativep. 331
Software Architecture Analysis Method (SAAM)p. 331
Software Architecture Technology Guidep. 331
Telecommunications Information Networking Architecture (TINA)p. 332
Unified Modeling Language (UML)p. 333
Workflow Management Coalitionp. 333
World-Wide Institute of Software Architectsp. 334
World Wide Web Consortiump. 334
XMIp. 335
Extensible Markup Language (XML)p. 335
Glossaryp. 337
About the Authorsp. 365
Indexp. 367