Cover image for The complete wireless communications professional : a guide for engineers and managers
Title:
The complete wireless communications professional : a guide for engineers and managers
Author:
Webb, William, 1967-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Artech House, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xv, 404 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780890063385
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This text details the essential engineering principles of wireless communications and examines the financial and marketing considerations that contribute to making any communications product viable. It also provides guidance on career topics such as conflict resolution and career structure.


Author Notes

William Webb received both a Ph.D. in mobile radio and an M.B.A. from Southampton University.

Dr. Webb is director of strategy at Motorola. He is a fellow of the IEEE, a senior member of the IEEE, and a chartered engineer. Dr. Webb holds four patents and has also authored Introduction to Wireless Local Loop, Second Edition; The Complete Wireless Communications Professional; and Understanding Cellular Radio (Artech House 2000, 1999, 1998). He is listed in “Who’s Who in America”.

050


Table of Contents

Preface: What is a complete wireless professional?p. xiii
Introductionp. xiii
Format of this bookp. xiv
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Part I Introductory materialp. 1
1 Some interesting historyp. 3
1.1 Introductionp. 3
1.2 Early historyp. 4
1.3 Some key milestones in mobile radio historyp. 8
1.4 Recent historyp. 10
Referencesp. 16
Part II Mobile radio systemsp. 17
2 The basics of mobile radiop. 19
2.1 Introductionp. 19
2.2 Basic principles of propagationp. 20
2.3 Radio spectrum utilizationp. 32
2.4 Basic system designp. 37
2.4.1 System overviewp. 37
2.4.2 Voice encodingp. 37
2.4.3 Secure transmissionp. 46
2.4.4 Overcoming channel imperfectionsp. 48
2.4.5 Frequency and phase modulationp. 55
2.4.6 Clock recoveryp. 64
2.4.7 Carrier recoveryp. 66
2.4.8 Multiple accessp. 68
2.5 Packet and circuit transmissionp. 79
2.6 Theoretical capacity of mobile radio systemsp. 80
Referencesp. 82
Further readingp. 83
3 Cellular radio technologiesp. 85
3.1 The range of cellular systemsp. 85
3.2 GSMp. 88
3.2.1 System architecturep. 88
3.2.2 Locating a subscriber and starting callsp. 91
3.2.3 Transmission within GSMp. 93
3.3 cdmaOnep. 101
3.4 Other systemsp. 106
Referencesp. 106
4 Private mobile radio systemsp. 107
4.1 Introductionp. 107
4.2 Simple private radio systemsp. 114
4.3 Tetrap. 119
4.3.1 Introductionp. 119
4.3.2 System operationp. 120
4.3.3 Technical parametersp. 123
4.4 Other systemsp. 125
Referencesp. 125
5 Other mobile radio systemsp. 127
5.1 Introductionp. 127
5.2 Cordless systemsp. 128
5.2.1 Overview of cordless telephonyp. 128
5.2.2 Digital enhanced cordless telephonep. 130
5.2.3 Personal handiphone systemp. 134
5.3 Wireless local loop systemsp. 135
5.3.1 Introduction to wireless local loopp. 135
5.3.2 Access technologies: radio and cablep. 137
5.3.3 WLL and cellular: the differencesp. 142
5.3.4 Technologies for WLL and LMDS/MVDSp. 144
5.4 Satellite systems for telephonyp. 149
5.4.1 Introductionp. 149
5.4.2 Conceptp. 150
5.4.3 Economics of satellite systemsp. 153
5.5 TV, radio, and other systemsp. 154
Referencesp. 159
6 Interfacing with fixed networksp. 161
6.1 The need for fixed networksp. 161
6.2 Fixed network architecturesp. 162
6.3 Fixed network protocolsp. 170
6.4 Fixed mobile convergencep. 178
6.4.1 Introductionp. 178
6.4.2 Defining fixed-mobile convergencep. 179
6.4.3 Possible solutionsp. 179
6.4.4 The future of the FMC marketplacep. 185
Referencesp. 187
Part III The mobile network operatorp. 189
7 Designing a mobile radio networkp. 191
7.1 Technical designp. 191
7.1.1 Introductionp. 191
7.1.2 Network planningp. 193
7.1.3 Radio planningp. 196
7.1.4 Microcells and picocellsp. 198
7.1.5 Interconnectionp. 199
7.1.6 Operations and maintenance planningp. 203
7.1.7 Supplier selectionp. 204
7.1.8 Network deploymentp. 205
7.2 Applying for a licensep. 205
7.3 The mobile radio equipment manufacturerp. 208
Referencesp. 210
8 Economics of a mobile radio networkp. 211
8.1 Understanding financial informationp. 211
8.1.1 Introduction to accountingp. 211
8.1.2 The profit and loss accountp. 212
8.1.3 The balance sheetp. 215
8.1.4 The funds flow statementp. 218
8.1.5 Performing first pass modelingp. 221
8.2 The business casep. 223
8.2.1 The overall structure of the business casep. 223
8.2.2 The network costsp. 223
8.2.3 The operating expensesp. 227
8.2.4 Revenuep. 227
8.2.5 Financingp. 233
8.2.6 Summaryp. 235
Referencesp. 238
9 Operating a mobile radio networkp. 239
9.1 Introductionp. 239
9.2 Monitoring the networkp. 240
9.3 Tariff policies and their implicationsp. 244
9.4 Capacity enhancementp. 246
9.4.1 Introductionp. 246
9.4.2 The available capacity enhancement techniquesp. 246
9.4.3 Dual-band operationp. 247
9.4.4 Techniques affecting the cluster sizep. 247
9.4.5 Using more cellsp. 251
9.4.6 Which capacity enhancement techniques should be used when?p. 252
10 Large users of mobile radio networksp. 255
10.1 Introductionp. 255
10.2 Railwaysp. 257
10.2.1 Introductionp. 257
10.2.2 Current railway communications within Europep. 258
10.2.3 Railway requirementsp. 259
10.2.4 PMR versus cellularp. 261
10.3 Policep. 263
10.3.1 Introductionp. 263
10.3.2 Description of requirementsp. 264
10.3.3 Selection of radio systemp. 265
10.4 Other emergency servicesp. 266
10.5 Other usersp. 267
11 Future mobile radio systemsp. 269
11.1 Progress in radio systemsp. 269
11.2 The third generation visionp. 270
11.3 Designing the third generation systemp. 274
Referencesp. 277
Part IV Regulators and governmentsp. 279
12 Radio spectrump. 281
12.1 Introductionp. 281
12.2 The management of radio spectrump. 282
12.3 Modern allocation and assignment methodsp. 287
12.4 Implications for the mobile radio operatorp. 290
12.5 Government policyp. 294
Referencesp. 297
13 Standardizationp. 299
13.1 Introductionp. 299
13.2 Standards-making bodiesp. 300
13.3 Writing standardsp. 304
Referencesp. 307
Part V Becoming a better wireless professionalp. 309
14 Areas of conflictp. 311
14.1 Introductionp. 311
14.2 TETRA versus GSMp. 313
14.2.1 Background to the debatep. 313
14.2.2 Evaluation of the technologiesp. 313
14.2.3 Economic comparisonp. 315
14.2.4 Analyzing the debatep. 318
14.3 DECT versus PHSp. 319
14.3.1 Background to the debatep. 319
14.3.2 The key issuesp. 319
14.3.3 Analyzing the debatep. 321
14.4 CDMA versus TDMAp. 322
14.4.1 Background to the debatep. 322
14.4.2 The capacity of CDMA versus TDMAp. 323
14.4.3 Other issues introduced into the debatep. 325
14.4.4 Analyzing the debatep. 327
14.5 Handling conflictp. 327
Referencesp. 328
15 Managementp. 329
15.1 Introductionp. 329
15.2 An overview of managementp. 330
15.3 Understanding corporate strategyp. 332
Referencesp. 338
16 The complete wireless professionalp. 339
16.1 Introductionp. 339
16.2 Conferences and publicationsp. 340
16.3 Links with research organizationsp. 346
16.4 Qualificationsp. 349
Referencesp. 350
Appendix A Erlang B macrop. 351
Appendix B Mandating standardsp. 353
B.1 Introductionp. 353
B.2 The key issuesp. 354
B.3 Case studiesp. 359
B.4 Implicationsp. 361
B.5 Conclusionsp. 362
Referencesp. 363
Glossaryp. 365
About the authorp. 385
Indexp. 387