Cover image for From this day forward
Title:
From this day forward
Author:
Roberts, Cokie.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow, 2000.
Physical Description:
xvi, 352 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688168919
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PN4874.R5414 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
PN4874.R5414 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
PN4874.R5414 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
PN4874.R5414 A3 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Journalists Cokie and Steve Roberts take a look at the institution of marriage American style, including their own match of thirty-three years, in this compelling and wise new book that is destined to be another bestseller

With a narrative structure similar to We Are Our Mothers' Daughters, Cokie and Steve Roberts use personal recollections as a springboard for the discussion of larger issues such as marriage, love, and family. When Cokie and Steve Roberts got married, some "friends" said it wouldn't last-just because she's Catholic and he's Jewish. Proving the doubters wrong, they have been married for over thirty years and have a few pieces of advice. Cokie and Steve will discuss issues from their own marriage as well as open a window onto famous unions in history, as seen from their different perspectives as husband and wife. Those stories tell a tale of the particular strengths and weaknesses of marriage in America and show the foundation of marriage as one that's undergone tremendous amounts of change while remaining fundamentally the same.

With a narrative structure similar to We Are Our Mothers' Daughters, Cokie and Steve Roberts use personal recollections as a springboard for the discussion of larger issues such as marriage, love, and family. When Cokie and Steve Roberts got married, some "friends" said it wouldn't last-just because she's Catholic and he's Jewish. Proving the doubters wrong, they have been married for over thirty years and have a few pieces of advice. Cokie and Steve will discuss issues from their own marriage as well as open a window onto famous unions in history, as seen from their different perspectives as husband and wife. Those stories tell a tale of the particular strengths and weaknesses of marriage in America and show the foundation of marriage as one that's undergone tremendous amounts of change while remaining fundamentally the same.With a narrative structure similar to We Are Our Mothers' Daughters, Cokie and Steve Roberts use personal recollections as a springboard for the discussion of larger issues such as marriage, love, and family. When Cokie and Steve Roberts got married, some "friends" said it wouldn't last-just because she's Catholic and he's Jewish. Proving the doubters wrong, they have been married for over thirty years and have a few pieces of advice. Cokie and Steve will discuss issues from their own marriage as well as open a window onto famous unions in history, as seen from their different perspectives as husband and wife. Those stories tell a tale of the particular strengths and weaknesses of marriage in America and show the foundation of marriage as one that's undergone tremendous amounts of change while remaining fundamentally the same.


Author Notes

Cokie Roberts was born in 1943 in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a journalist, author and contributing senior news analyst for National Public Radio as well as a regular roundtable analyst for the current This Week with George Stephanopoulos. Roberts also works as a political commentator for ABC News. Roberts, along with her husband, Steven V. Roberts, writes a weekly column syndicated by United Media in newspapers around the United States. She serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations such as the Kaiser Family Foundation and was appointed by President George W. Bush to his Council on Service and Civic Participation.

Cokie Roberts is the youngest daughter of the late ambassador and long-time Democratic Congresswoman from Louisiana Lindy Boggs and of the late Hale Boggs, also a Democratic Congressman from Louisiana who was Majority Leader of the House of Representatives and a member of the Warren Commission.

Roberts graduated from Wellesley College in 1964, where she received a BA in Political Science. Roberts has won numerous awards, such as the Edward R. Murrow Award, the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for coverage of Congress and a 1991 Emmy Award for her contribution to "Who is Ross Perot?"

Cokie's books include We Are Our Mother's Daughters (1998), Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation (2004), Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation (2008), with Steven Roberts, From This Day Forward (2000), also with Steven Roberts, Our Haggadah: Uniting Traditions for Interfaith Families (2011), and children's book Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies (2014).

Robert's title, Capital Dames: The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868, is a 2015 New York Times bestseller.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

In this audiobook, to be released simultaneously with the book, the journalistic power couple discuss issues of their own 33-year marriage and other famous unions. They divide the chapters into smaller segments, like a discussion. An abridged edition is coming from Nova at the same time. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From This Day Forward Chapter One Our Lives Early Days Courtship We are often asked how we met, usually by young peoplewho are still wondering about this marriage thing. When doyou know you've found the right person? How can you tell?The problem is summed up by Steve's twin brother, Marc,who likes to put it this way: Choosing a mate is like beingtold to walk through a forest and pick up the biggest stickyou can find. But you only get to pick up one stick and younever know when the forest will end. In our case it was evenmore complicated. Since Cokie is Catholic and Steve is Jewish, the kind of stick each of us chose was also an issue -- toourselves and to our families. But in another sense we werefollowing a familiar pattern, meeting and marrying young.We both have brothers who married at twenty. Like us,Cokie's parents, Hale and Lindy Boggs, met in college, wherethey worked on the student newspaper together. Steve's father, Will, met his bride, Dorothy, on her seventeenth birthday. And he used to look around at gatherings of his children and grandchildren, when the tribe had reached eighteen, and say with considerable pride, "See what happens when you walk a girl home from a birthday party?" Our story is not quite so romantic, but typical of our life -- public and private threads woven together. Steve was nineteen, Cokie eighteen. It was the summer of 1962, between our sophomore and junior years in college, and we both were attending a student political conference at Ohio State. CR: I saw Steven across the yard and he looked familiar to me because I knew his twin brother. And I kept thinking, Is that Marc Roberts? He doesn't quite look like Marc Roberts, but he looks a whole lot like Marc Roberts. And then I got up close to him and he had a name tag, so I said, "Are you Marc Roberts's brother?" And he said, "Yes, are you Barbara Boggs's sister?" And that's how we met. SR: I had actually heard of Cokie all that summer. I had been recruited by one of my Harvard professors, Paul Sigmund, who was looking for student journalists to put out a newspaper at the World Youth Festival in Helsinki, Finland. I didn't know that our trip was financed by the CIA, or that Paul would later marry Cokie's sister, making us brothers-inlaw as well as co-conspirators. Another recruit was Bob Kaiser, then at Yale, an old friend of the Boggs family, and in Helsinki he kept telling me about this girl he knew at Wellesley, Cokie Boggs. But Bob made a critical mistake: he stayed in Europe. I went home early for the political meeting, and since I'd heard about her from Bob, I knew who she was when I met her. CR: But he has this picture in his mind that I was wearing a pair of charcoal-gray Bermuda shorts and I have never in my life owned a pair of charcoal-gray Bermuda shorts. It was 1962. It might have been 1932 in terms of men and women. The fact that I actually spoke at this meeting was highly unusual. SR: But I also found that intriguing. I think from the very beginning, the fact that Cokie was so independent-minded and so forceful appealed to me. I mean, she was not the secretary sitting at the back of the room taking notes. CR: Although really, I took quite a few. SR: We started flirting, writing notes to each other during these endless meetings, and Cokie has actually saved some of them all these years. On a long list of people who had been nominated for national office, I scribbled on the side, "You're so efficient it hurts." She wrote back, "I'm the youngest child of an insane family -- somebody had to be efficient, otherwise we'd starve!" I answered, "Be efficient, but jeezus -- don't ever get comfortable. It's such a deadly disease!" That statement probably defines the word "sophomoric," but it also shows how little I knew about myself I was actually looking for comfort and I think she might have known that. Her final word on the "deadly disease" question was, "Would that I could ever have the opportunity to catch it!" CR: And then we went back to school. Our dorms were only twelve and a half miles apart, we later learned, but at first he didn't call me. So I think I called him and invited him to the junior Show. Is that what happened? SR: That would be typical. I remember sitting in the audience, watching her sing -- a symbolic way to spend our first date. I remember afterward she was wearing a bright green dress, and we went to the Howard Johnson's down in the village for something to eat. CR: And then I came home and I'd had such a good time, such a good time, I went dancing up the stairs singing "I Feel Pretty." And then he never called. SR: I didn't call because I was petrified. I had this rule that I didn't call a girl more than twice. I really liked her and I enjoyed the show, but I was unnerved. I was a typical guy. I was nineteen. But there were other guys from Harvard who went to Wellesley regularly and I would hear from them, "Cokie Boggs asked after you." So we had this long-distance communication. I knew where she was. I knew where to find her. From This Day Forward . Copyright © by Cokie Roberts. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from From This Day Forward by Cokie Roberts, Steven V. Roberts All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. xi
Chapter 1 Our Lives: Early Daysp. 1
Courtshipp. 1
Weddingp. 20
Chapter 2 Other Lives: Early Americap. 37
Companionate Marriagep. 37
Slave Marriagesp. 63
Chapter 3 Our Lives: Leaving Homep. 86
Newlyweds in New Yorkp. 86
New Parents in Californiap. 107
Growing Up in Greecep. 135
Chapter 4 Other Lives New Places, New Rolesp. 172
Pioneer Marriagesp. 172
Immigrant Marriagesp. 196
Chapter 5 Our Lives: Coming Homep. 218
Family Housep. 218
Equal Workp. 232
Empty Nestp. 252
Chapter 6 Other Lives: Broken Marriagesp. 285
Getting Divorcedp. 285
Blended Familiesp. 314
Chapter 7 Our Lives: From This Day Forwardp. 337
Suggested Readingp. 349