Cover image for Hawke's Cove
Title:
Hawke's Cove
Author:
Wilson, Susan, 1951-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Pocket Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
282 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780671035730
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The acclaimed author of the lovable (Entertainment Weekly) debut novel Beauty delivers a magical new tale of passion, memory, and loss in a small New England town during World War II.


Author Notes

Susan Wilson lives in Martha's Vineyard with her husband & two daughters.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The recent discovery of a World War II plane near Hawke's Cove triggers a reporter's interest in the 49-year-old case and awakens his mother's memories. Vangie Worth spent her childhood summers with her grandmother in Hawke's Cove, a tiny island off Cape Cod. When her husband was drafted overseas, Vangie returned to her grandmother's farm, where she waged her own war against loneliness and the grief of losing their first baby. She kept a journal that marked every event in the tiny community, especially the downing of the small Hellcat and the concurrent arrival of Joe Green, a kind yet elusive man who helped her with the farm. Wilson allows most of this engaging if formulaic tale to unfold in Vangie's journal, which she dusts off when she hears of the plane's discovery. But other viewpoints, including those of Vangie's husband, their son, Joe Green, and his daughter, offer a wider perspective on a decades-old romance that was never given the opportunity to flourish until now. --Kristin Kloberdanz


Publisher's Weekly Review

The journal entries of Evangeline (Vangie) Worth, a WWII bride whose husband, John, is overseas, make up the bulk of this amiable follow-up to Wilson's praised first novel, Beauty. Recovering from the loss of her first baby, Vangie spends the summer of 1944 in Hawke's Cove, a New England coastal community and her childhood vacation spot. Poetry and journal writing fill her time until a stranger shows up looking for work. Joe Green, who mysteriously appears in town at a time when almost every able-bodied man is "over there," moves into Vangie's guest room in exchange for repairing her dilapidated barn. Working on the farm and socializing with the locals, the two become great friends. When Vangie learns that John is missing in action, Joe becomes her pillar of support, and their idyllic relationship blossoms. Then John is found and sent home to Boston, where Vangie must meet him, leaving everything behind except her memories. Deftly shifting back and forth from Vangie's journal entries to the narratives of five other characters, Wilson assembles a polyvocal assortment of letters, journals and text spanning 50 years. Ushering the story into 1993, Vangie's journalist son, Charlie, travels to Hawke's Cove to investigate a recently dredged up Hellcat plane that crashed there in 1944. In a twist of fate, he falls for a local girl; she is Maggie Green, who helps him uncover the true story of the old military plane, her enigmatic father and his reticent mother. Sentimental and sweet, Wilson's tale proves her an empathetic storyteller whose plainspoken Yankee characters have strong appeal. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This is the story of a lonely young woman left behind when her husband goes off to fight during World War II and a fighter pilot who goes AWOL. Set on a small island similar to Martha's Vineyard, and told partially through the young woman's journal, the story explores the themes of love vs. duty, obedience vs. morality, and the costs of patriotism. Evangeline Worth and Joe Green come to know each other slowly and almost unwillingly, and when they are ultimately separated, each goes on to lead a full and meaningful life, while never forgetting the other. The lessons about choices and never-forgotten love are haunting. Wilson's second novel (after Beauty) would be a terrific book discussion choice. For all fiction collections.--Kim Uden Rutter, Lake Villa District Lib., IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.