Cover image for Won't know till I get there
Title:
Won't know till I get there
Author:
Myers, Walter Dean, 1937-2014.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Puffin Books, 1988.

©1982
Physical Description:
176 pages ; 20 cm
Summary:
Fourteen-year-old Stephen, his new foster brother, his friends are sentenced to help out at an old age home for the summer after Stephen is caught writing graffiti on a train.
General Note:
"Ages 10-14"--P. [4] of cover.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
840 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.0 7.0 108325.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.4 10 Quiz: 12800 Guided reading level: T.
ISBN:
9780140326123
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

From the New York Times bestselling, National Book Award-nominated author of Monster and Fallen Angels

When Steve's parents decide to adopt a foster child, it seems like a good idea. And when Steve decides to show the new kid how tough he is by spray-painting the side of a subway car, that seems like a good idea too. But the foster child turns out to be a thirteen-year-old with a criminal record, and the guys in the designer jeans watching Steve spray-paint graffiti turn out to be transit police. Suddenly Steve and the whole gang are serving time, working in an old-age home with a bunch of feisty and independent senior citizens who refuse to sit still and be stereotyped--by anybody.


"Another winning novel told with nimble wit and poignancy." -- Publishers Weekly

"Myers explores the value and meaning of true friendship. . . The tone is alternately funny, sad, and sentimental, but always natural and appealing." -- School Library Journal

An ALA Notable Book


Author Notes

Walter Dean Myers was born on August 12, 1937 in Martinsberg, West Virginia. When he was three years old, his mother died and his father sent him to live with Herbert and Florence Dean in Harlem, New York. He began writing stories while in his teens. He dropped out of high school and enlisted in the Army at the age of 17. After completing his army service, he took a construction job and continued to write.

He entered and won a 1969 contest sponsored by the Council on Interracial Books for Children, which led to the publication of his first book, Where Does the Day Go? During his lifetime, he wrote more than 100 fiction and nonfiction books for children and young adults. His works include Fallen Angels, Bad Boy, Darius and Twig, Scorpions, Lockdown, Sunrise Over Fallujah, Invasion, Juba!, and On a Clear Day. He also collaborated with his son Christopher, an artist, on a number of picture books for young readers including We Are America: A Tribute from the Heart and Harlem, which received a Caldecott Honor Award, as well as the teen novel Autobiography of My Dead Brother.

He was the winner of the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award for Monster, the first recipient of the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, and a recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. He also won the Coretta Scott King Award for African American authors five times. He died on July 1, 2014, following a brief illness, at the age of 76.

(Bowker Author Biography)