Cover image for My soul is a witness : a chronology of the civil rights era, 1954-1965
Title:
My soul is a witness : a chronology of the civil rights era, 1954-1965
Author:
Collier-Thomas, Bettye.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Henry Holt, 2000.

©1999
Physical Description:
xvii, 268 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805047691
Format :
Book

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E185.61 .C697 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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E185.61 .C697 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

A powerful and inspiring record of one of the most significant periods in America's history, which presents the full historic scope of the hard-fought battle for civil rights.

From the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, in which legal segregation in public schools was declared unconstitutional, to the Nashville sit-ins organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and from the Freedom Rides to the March on Washington, to the subsequent passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965-and covering everything in between-My Soul Is a Witness is the first comprehensive chronology of the civil rights era in America.

This unique chronology extends the examination of civil rights activities beyond the South to include the North, Midwest, and Far West. Although Martin Luther King, Jr., was a towering figure during the era, the authors shift the focus to the thousands of people, places, and events that encompassed the Civil Rights movement. Each entry is based on information found in articles and reports published in three newspaper and periodical sources: The New York Times, Jet Magazine, and the Southern School News. Supplementing the basic chronology are longer features that explore larger topics in more depth and highlight issues well-known at the time but unknown today by scholars and the general public.


Author Notes

Bettye Collier-Thomas is Professor of History and Director of the Center for African American History and Culture at Temple University. She lives in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.
V.P. Franklin is Distinguished Professor of History in the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University in Philadelphia.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

The authors (both history professors) examine one of the most significant periods in U.S. history. Among the topics covered are the Brown v. Board of Education decision, freedom rides, and the famous March on Washington. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xix
1954 "Higher Ground"p. 3
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1954
The Desegregation of U.S. Colleges and Universitiesp. 5
Brown v. Board of Education: Legal Segregation in Public Education Unconstitutionalp. 6
The Formation of the White Citizens Councilsp. 8
Mob Violence over School Integration in Delawarep. 11
Ending of Racial Segregation in the U.S. Armed Forcesp. 14
1955 "Climbing Jacob's Ladder"p. 19
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1955
White Students Enrolled in All-Black Colleges and Universitiesp. 23
Race Relations Survey--1955p. 25
Citing Brown Decision, Courts Prohibit Segregation in Public Recreational Facilitiesp. 27
Southern Black Teachers Under Attackp. 31
Racial Violence and Attacks on NAACP Leadersp. 35
1956 "Better be Ready"p. 39
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1956
The Montgomery Bus Boycottp. 42
Bus Boycotts Spread to Other Southern Citiesp. 45
Legislative Attacks on the NAACP and Court-Ordered School Integrationp. 48
White Citizens Councils Launch Attacks on Urban League Branchesp. 52
Positive and Negative Responses of Organized Labor to Civil Rights Demandsp. 54
1957 "Amazing Grace"p. 57
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1957
Organized Religion and Racial Segregation, 1956-57p. 59
Nonviolent Protests Spread to Other Southern Citiesp. 63
State Bans on Interracial Sports Competitionp. 66
Showdown at Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansasp. 69
Concerts, Movies, Television, and Civil Rightsp. 73
1958 "A Balm in Gilead"p. 77
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1958
"Crusade for Citizenship"--Voter Registration Campaignsp. 80
Problems of Discrimination in Housingp. 83
1958--The Year of the Bombingsp. 87
Southern Politicians Respond to Federal Intervention in Public School Integrationp. 91
Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: Political Independentp. 93
1959 "The Storms of Life are Raging"p. 97
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1959
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Swings into Actionp. 101
International Incidents Caused by Racial Discrimination in the United Statesp. 104
The Rabbit's Wedding: An Interracial Romance?p. 107
Little Rock Public Schools Reopen, But Violence and Massive Resistance Continuep. 110
The Failure of Massive Resistance in Virginiap. 113
1960 "Goin' to Lay Down My Sword and Shield"p. 117
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1960
Southern Students Launch the Sit-In Movementp. 118
Economic Reprisals Directed Against Black Voters in Fayette and Haywood Counties, Tenn., 1960-61p. 122
Wade-Ins, Kneel-Ins, Read-Ins: Desegregation of Public Facilitiesp. 124
Confronting Discrimination in Employment and Labor Unionsp. 128
Black Voters and the Presidential Election of 1960p. 131
1961 "I've Been 'Buked and I've Been Scorned"p. 137
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1961
The University of Georgia and the Desegregation of U.S. Colleges and Universitiesp. 139
"Jail, No Bail": Sit-Ins as Civil Disobediencep. 142
"Plans for Progress"--Campaigns to End Employment Discriminationp. 146
CORE Launches the Freedom Ridesp. 150
"No Negroes Wanted": Housing as a Step Toward Equalityp. 156
1962 "On Jordan's Stormy Banks"p. 159
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1962
"Bury Jim Crow": CORE Campaigns for Integrationp. 162
Opening the Floodgates: Public Accommodations Under Assaultp. 165
Public School Desegregation in the Southp. 169
The Albany Movement, 1961-62p. 172
James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Missp. 176
1963 "We Shall Overcome"p. 181
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1963
Campaigns Against Segregated Public Education in the Northp. 185
Attacks on Discrimination in Government-Sponsored Employmentp. 187
The Battle of Birminghamp. 190
SNCC Workers and Voter Registration Campaigns in the Southp. 195
Civil Rights Protests Grip the Nationp. 198
1964 "Free at Last?"p. 201
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1964
Violence Erupts in St. Augustine, Fla.p. 203
The Killing Fields: Mississippi and the Freedom Summer Projectp. 207
The Civil Rights Act of 1964p. 211
Voting Rights and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party's Challengep. 213
Desegregating Public Accommodations in 1964p. 218
1965 "Marching to Zion"p. 223
Civil Rights Entries--January to December 1965
Full Compliance: Federal Officials Move to Implement the Civil Rights Act of 1964p. 226
The Selma to Montgomery March and the Voting Rights Act of 1965p. 229
"Reverse Freedom Rides": The SCLC and SNCC Join the NAACP and CORE in Civil Rights Protests in the Northp. 233
Church Burnings, Bombings, and Racial Violence Continue in the Southp. 237
Deacons of Defense and Justicep. 241
The Aftermath: The Emergence of the Student Rights, Anti-War, Women's Liberation, and Black Power Movementsp. 243
Selected Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 251