Cover image for China in world history
Title:
China in world history
Author:
Adshead, Samuel Adrian M. (Samuel Adrian Miles)
Edition:
Third edition.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xviii, 434 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780312225650
Format :
Book

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DS740.4 .A644 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This new edition provides a new preface to this highly popular book. The theme of the book is China's relations with the non-Chinese world, not only political and economic, but cultural, social and technological as well. It seeks to show that China's history is part of everyone's history. In particular it traces China's relationship since the thirteenth century to the emergent world order and the various world institutions of which that order is comprised. Each chapter discusses China's comparative place in the world, the avenues of contact between China and other civilizations, and who and what passed along these channels.


Author Notes

S. A. M. Adshead is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

A unique and scholarly examination of the relationship of China with the outside world over the past 2,220 years, this book is appropriate for selected upper-division undergraduates and graduate students who could find it a catalyst to enliven seminar discussions. The breadth of the analysis presupposes reader control over the histories and cultures of both China and the West, along with some familiarity with India, the Near East, Africa, and "Amerindia." Adshead, a recognized authority in Chinese history, clearly is sensitive to comparisons and contrasts among the world's major civilizations. His bold conclusions are unfailingly stimulating, in part because some are controversial. This is not light reading, but insofar as it is successful in avoiding both Sinocentrism and Eurocentrism, it can fill a historiographical niche. -L. E. Williams, Brown University


Table of Contents

Introduction
World Apart: China in Antiquity, 200 BC to 400 AD
World Center: China in Late Antiquity, 400 to 1000
World Axis: China and the Middle Ages, 1000 to 1350
World Horizon: China and the Renaissance, 1350 to 1650
World Within a World: China in the Enlightenment, 1650 to 1833
Between Two Worlds: China in the Modern Age, 1833 to 1976
Postscript
Index