Cover image for Felix Salten's Bambi
Title:
Felix Salten's Bambi
Author:
Schulman, Janet.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
47 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Retells the adventures of a young deer growing up and learning about life in the forest.
General Note:
"An Anne Schwartz book."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.7 1.0 62769.
ISBN:
9780689819544
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

When Bambi is born on a spring morning deep in a forest glade, so begins one of the most moving and beloved of all children's stories. As the curious fawn grows into a majestic stag, he is exposed to all the beauty, hardship, and danger of the natural world. Bambi learns how to forage for food in winter and experiences the joy of frolicking in an open field in summer. He makes friends -- the wise old owl, the good hare, the chattery squirrels. And he confronts Man, the most feared of all creatures in the forest. Janet Schulman, Steve Johnson, and Lou Fancher have brilliantly adapted and reillustrated Felix Salten's classic novel to create a storybook perfectly suited for young readers. Children who loved Walt Disney's animated film and those who have an abiding interest in the natural world will be enchanted by this stunning presentation of an unforgettable tale.


Author Notes

Janet Schulman was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 16, 1933. She graduated from Antioch College in 1956. She started her publishing career in 1959 at Macmillan, where she became the director of children's book marketing. She then worked for more than 30 years at Random House, where she was the last editor there to edit Dr. Seuss. She fought for equality for women in publishing. She also wrote numerous children's books including Pale Male: Citizen Hawk of New York City, The Nutcracker, Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf, A Bunny for All Seasons, and 10 Easter Egg Hunters: A Holiday Counting Book. She died of complications from lung cancer on February 11, 2011 at the age of 77.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Departing from the cuddly-fawn model of the classic Disney film, Schulman (The 20th Century Children's Book Treasury) restores the depth of Bambi's character as she introduces young readers to Bambi: A Life in the Woods, Felix Salten's 1923 novel. Young Bambi explores his new world with wide, wondering eyes, soaking up the experiences that will help him grow into a strong, brave and independent stag. But in order to survive, Bambi must also heed the advice of the wise Great Prince and remember his mother's warnings about "Him," the two-legged "creature" who hunts the animals of the forest. Unfortunately, "He" soon claims the life of Bambi's mother, forcing Bambi to carry on alone. Combining innocence, realism and a profound respect for nature, Schulman's text swiftly moves to the heart of Salten's lessons, namely, the importance of thinking for oneself and of acknowledging that no living creature is all-powerful. Johnson and Fancher, previously paired on Copp‚lia by Margot Fonteyn, provide stirring nature scenes in oil paintings of varied size and shape, dappled with sunlight or sometimes darkened by ominous shadows. Whether they are frolicking in fields of purple wildflowers or scattering at the hint of danger, the artists' deer are beauties. All ages. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Many children know this story from the Disney film, but the book's lyrical, sometimes old-fashioned prose with its occasionally harshly realistic view of nature makes it most suitable for older children. Here is a well-crafted adaptation of the original story that is aimed at younger readers. It still recounts the story of Bambi and his life in the forest, but by carefully selecting words and phrases (many of them Salten's own), Schulman has told a much more compact version of the tale, but one that still retains the spirit and essence of the original. The major difference is that many of the descriptive passages have been eliminated, so readers get less of a feel for Bambi's surroundings and a bit less of the poetic tone. However, all of the main events are included, even the deaths of Bambi's mother and others, and the story's theme of humanity as the biggest danger facing the forest dwellers remains intact. This is not a "sanitized" retelling of the story, just a shorter one. The rather somber mood is well complemented by oil paintings that lend an extra element of emotion. The hard realities of life in the wild are still evident, and some of the events may be disturbing to younger, more sensitive children. Others, though, will certainly welcome this nicely presented, accessible version of a beloved tale.-Arwen Marshall, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Excerpt from: Chapter IV One evening Bambi was roaming about the meadow again with his mother. He thought that he knew everything there was to see or hear there. But in reality it appeared that he did not know as much as he thought. This time was just like the first. Bambi played tag with his mother. He ran around in circles, and the open space, the deep sky, the fresh air intoxicated him so that he grew perfectly wild. After a while he noticed that his mother was standing still. he stopped short in the middle of a leap so suddenly that his four legs spread far apart. To get his balance he bounded high into the air and then stood erect. His mother seemed to be talking to someone he couldn't make out through the tall grasses. Bambi toddled up inquisitively. Two long ears were moving in the tangled grass stems close to his mother. They were grayish brown and prettily marked with black stripes. Bambi stopped, but his mother said, "Come here. This is our friend, the Hare. come here like a nice boy and let him see you." Bambi went over. There sat the Hare looking like a very honest creature. At times his long spoonlike ears stood bolt upright. At others they fell back limply as though they had suddenly grown weak. Bambi became somewhat critical as he looked at the whiskers that stood out so stiff and straight on both sides of the Hare's mouth. But he noticed that the Hare had a very mild face and extremely good-natured feature and that he cast timid glances at the world from out of his big round eyes. The Hare really did look friendly. Bambi's passing doubts vanished immediately. But oddly enough, he had lost all the respect he originally felt for the Hare. "Good evening, young man," the Hare greeted him, with studied politeness. Bambi merel y nodded good evening. He didn't understand why, but he simply nodded. He was very friendly and civil, but a little condescending. He could not help himself. Perhaps he was born that way. "What a charming young prince," said the Hare to Bambi's mother. he looked at Bambi attentively , raising first one spoonlike ear, then the other, and then both of them, and letting them fall again, suddenly and limply, which didn't please Bambi. The motion of the Hare's ears seemed to say, "He isn't worth bothering." Meanwhile the hare continued to study Bambi with his big round eyes. His nose and his mouth with the handsome whiskers moved incessantly in the same way a man who is trying not to sneeze twitches his nose and lips. Bambi had to laugh. The Hare laughed quickly, too, but his eyes grew more thoughtful. "I congratulate you ," he said to Bambi's mother. "I sincerely congratulate you on your son. Yes, indeed, he'll make a splendid prince in time. Anyone can see that." Copyright © 1928 by Simon & Schuster Inc. Copyright © renewed 1956 by Simon & Schuster Inc. Excerpted from Bambi: A Life in the Woods by Felix Salten All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.