Cover image for Stirrings in the jug : Black politics in the post-segregation era
Title:
Stirrings in the jug : Black politics in the post-segregation era
Author:
Reed, Adolph L., 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiii, 303 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The jug and its content: a perspective on Black American political development -- The "Black revolution" and the reconstitution of domination -- The black urban regime: structural origins and constraints -- Sources on demobilization in the new Black political regime: incorporation, ideological capitulation, and radical failure in the post-segregation era -- A critique of neoprogressivism in theorizing about local development policy: a case from Atlanta -- The "underclass" as myth and symbol: the poverty of discourse about poverty -- The allure of Malcolm X and the changing character of Black politics.
ISBN:
9780816626809

9780816626816
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Skeptical of received wisdom, Reed casts a critical eye on political trends in the black community over the past thirty years. He examines the rise of a new black political class in the aftermath of the civil rights era, and bluntly denounces black leadership that is not accountable to a black constituency; such leadership, he says, functions as a proxy for white elites. Reed debunks as myths the 'endangered black male" and the "black underclass, " and punctures what he views as the exaggeration and self-deception surrounding the black power movement and the Malcolm X revival. He chastises the Left, too, for its failure to develop an alternative politics, then lays out a practical leftist agenda and reasserts the centrality of political action.


Summary

Skeptical of received wisdom, Reed casts a critical eye on political trends in the black community over the past thirty years. He examines the rise of a new black political class in the aftermath of the civil rights era, and bluntly denounces black leadership that is not accountable to a black constituency; such leadership, he says, functions as a proxy for white elites. Reed debunks as myths the 'endangered black male" and the "black underclass, " and punctures what he views as the exaggeration and self-deception surrounding the black power movement and the Malcolm X revival. He chastises the Left, too, for its failure to develop an alternative politics, then lays out a practical leftist agenda and reasserts the centrality of political action.


Author Notes

Adolph Reed Jr. is professor of political science at the New School for Social Research.


Adolph Reed Jr. is professor of political science at the New School for Social Research.


Table of Contents

Julian BondJulian Bond
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
1. The Jug and Its Content: A Perspective on Black American Political Developmentp. 1
Part I
2. The "Black Revolution" and the Reconstitution of Dominationp. 55
3. The Black Urban Regime: Structural Origins and Constraintsp. 79
4. Sources of Demobilization in the New Black Political Regime: Incorporation, Ideological Capitulation, and Radical Failure in the Post-Segregation Erap. 117
Part II
5. A Critique of Neoprogressivism in Theorizing about Local Development Policy: A Case from Atlantap. 163
6. The "Underclass" as Myth and Symbol: The Poverty of Discourse about Povertyp. 179
7. The Allure of Malcolm X and the Changing Character of Black Politicsp. 197
Notesp. 225
Permissionsp. 289
Indexp. 291
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
1. The Jug and Its Content: A Perspective on Black American Political Developmentp. 1
Part I
2. The "Black Revolution" and the Reconstitution of Dominationp. 55
3. The Black Urban Regime: Structural Origins and Constraintsp. 79
4. Sources of Demobilization in the New Black Political Regime: Incorporation, Ideological Capitulation, and Radical Failure in the Post-Segregation Erap. 117
Part II
5. A Critique of Neoprogressivism in Theorizing about Local Development Policy: A Case from Atlantap. 163
6. The "Underclass" as Myth and Symbol: The Poverty of Discourse about Povertyp. 179
7. The Allure of Malcolm X and the Changing Character of Black Politicsp. 197
Notesp. 225
Permissionsp. 289
Indexp. 291