Cover image for U·X·L encyclopedia of biomes
Title:
U·X·L encyclopedia of biomes
Author:
Weigel, Marlene.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Detroit : U·X·L, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
3 volumes (lvi, 521 pages, 48 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm
General Note:
Col. map on lining papers.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. Coniferous forest, continental margin, deciduous forest, desert -- v. 2. Grassland, lake and pond, ocean, rain forest -- v. 3. River and stream, seashore, tundra, wetland.
ISBN:
9780787637323

9780787637330

9780787637347

9780787637354
Format :
Book

Available:*

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QH541.14 .W45 2000 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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QH541.14 .W45 2000 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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QH541.14 .W45 2000 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This reference aims to help students understand geography, biology, climatology, anthropology and other important subjects through the study of oceans, deserts, rains, forests, tundras, and other biological communities.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-A preferable alternative to Biomes of the World (Grolier, 1999), both for its greater number of specific examples and for the repetitive, but not identical, lists of books, addresses, and Web sites at the end of each chapter. The two resources are similarly structured, with systematic overviews of distinctive climatic and physical characteristics, as well as surveys of plant and animal life for each biome, followed by closer looks at selected locations. However, Weigel examines more of the latter. She also inserts plenty of boxed charts and fact lists. A comprehensive index to each volume facilitates quick reference. The illustrations are the Achilles' heel: the biomes on the endpaper maps do not correspond to those within; color photos, confined to inserts in each volume, are neither indexed nor of good resolution; and the black-and-white pictures and maps are dark, even murky on occasion. Nonetheless, to serious students of the biosphere's complex systems, the less-than-stellar visuals will be outweighed by the methodical presentation of information and the links to further resources.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.