Cover image for Math and mathematicians : the history of math discoveries around the world
Title:
Math and mathematicians : the history of math discoveries around the world
Author:
Bruno, Leonard C.
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
volumes (<volumes1-4>) : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Biographies of mathematicians from throughout history and articles describing math concepts and principles.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. A-H -- v. 2. I-Z -- v. 3. (2003) -- v. 4. (2003).
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780787638122

9780787638139

9780787638146

9780787664800

9780787664817
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This two-volume set compiles mathematician biographies and articles describing math concepts and principles in one encyclopaedic set.


Summary

Compilation of fifty biographies of mathematicians from throughout history and approximately thirty-five articles describing math concepts and principles.


Summary

Compilation of fifty biographies of mathematicians from throughout history and approximately thirty-five articles describing math concepts and principles.


Summary

"Math & Mathematicians" compiles mathematician biographies and articles describing math concepts and principles -- and their discoveries -- in one encyclopedic set. The new 3rd and 4th volumes include 60 additional biographies, including John Allen Paulos, M.C. Escher, William Jones and Julia Robinson.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

This set covers the early lives, influences, and careers of 50 mathematicians whose contributions radically changed the field of mathematics. The individuals represent all time periods, most nationalities or ethnic groups, and both genders. There are also 35 entries on basic mathematical concepts, such as circle, and operations, such as addition. The text is written for the middle-school-and junior-high-level student, so the language is straightforward and as uncomplicated as it can get for mathematics information. Many special features enhance the book. Each volume begins with three tables of contents: entries in A^-Z order, "Entries by Mathematical Field, and "Biographical Entries by Ethnicity." These are followed by "Words to Know," which is a glossary of mathematical terms. Next is "Milestones in the History of Mathematics." This features a time line on the bottom of the pages with nonmathematical events (such as the building of the Great Wall of China) that will help the students put the corresponding math events in historical perspective. Within the articles, which are generally three to seven pages long, terms that are also entries appear in bold type. Scattered throughout the volumes are sidebars with related information about people or concepts that are important but did not merit their own entries. Some examples are "Marjorie Lee Browne," "Cooking with fractions," and "The euro." Each volume ends with a bibliography that includes Web sites and a cumulative index. The biographical entries include pronunciation guides for the names and at least one picture. They focus on childhood and education as much as on later accomplishments, which helps the young reader identify with the person. The entries for mathematical concepts include sidebars with glossary terms and definitions. Some of the definitions in the "Words to Know" are inaccurate or oversimplified. For instance, the definition of angle states "what is formed inside a triangle by two sides meeting at the vertex." Do angles not appear in any other shape? It would be more accurate to state they are formed by the meeting of any two lines. The word conversion is defined solely in terms of money. In mathematics, many other measurements are converted, such as inches to centimeters, grams to pounds, etc. Base has more mathematical significance than merely the multiplied number in an exponential expression. This term is even used with its other meaning in the definition of sexagesimal. Nevertheless, this is a wonderful set that will be very useful to middle-grade students and their teachers. Its price makes it affordable for most elementary, middle, and junior-high schools, and all public libraries should have it. Many high-school libraries will benefit from having it in their collections, too.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-10-Finding enough information on mathematicians can be problematic. This set goes a long way toward filling requests for material on the subject. Galileo, Isaac Newton, Ren‚ Descartes, and Pythagoras of Samos are here as is a host of lesser-known individuals such as Maria Agnesi, Nikolay Lobachevsky, and Srinivasa Ramanujan. Concepts such as "Pi" and "Prime number" are given extensive coverage. The writing is clear and accessible, and the biographies are often interesting. Every article includes a short list for further reading. Boxed sidebars and quotes are scattered throughout. Each volume opens with a useful table of contents, a list of "Entries by Mathematical Field" ("Logic," "Number theory," "Statistics," etc.), a chronology, and a glossary, and concludes with a "Selected Bibliography" (with Web sites) and a complete index. Illustrations are limited to black-and-white portraits of the mathematicians. While not as comprehensive as the Biographical Encyclopedia of Mathematicians, (Marshall Cavendish, 1999), this resource serves a slightly younger audience.-Jo-Anne Weinberg, Greenburgh Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This two-volume set is directed toward a secondary school audience. It is much more about the lives of 50 people who have done mathematics, or computer science, and much less about the work they did. It misses out altogether such important figures as David Hilbert. The set covers the early life, influences, and careers of mathematicians throughout history. There are about 35 articles that treat the concepts and principles that are appropriate to the time period, culture, and circumstances surrounding the work these people did. There are some 120 black-and-white illustrations, diagrams, charts, and maps. The language is appropriate for the intended audience and not postsecondary readers. Though these books may be useful additions to secondary school libraries or public libraries, they are not appropriate for academic libraries. D. Z. Spicer; University of Maryland


Booklist Review

This set covers the early lives, influences, and careers of 50 mathematicians whose contributions radically changed the field of mathematics. The individuals represent all time periods, most nationalities or ethnic groups, and both genders. There are also 35 entries on basic mathematical concepts, such as circle, and operations, such as addition. The text is written for the middle-school-and junior-high-level student, so the language is straightforward and as uncomplicated as it can get for mathematics information. Many special features enhance the book. Each volume begins with three tables of contents: entries in A^-Z order, "Entries by Mathematical Field, and "Biographical Entries by Ethnicity." These are followed by "Words to Know," which is a glossary of mathematical terms. Next is "Milestones in the History of Mathematics." This features a time line on the bottom of the pages with nonmathematical events (such as the building of the Great Wall of China) that will help the students put the corresponding math events in historical perspective. Within the articles, which are generally three to seven pages long, terms that are also entries appear in bold type. Scattered throughout the volumes are sidebars with related information about people or concepts that are important but did not merit their own entries. Some examples are "Marjorie Lee Browne," "Cooking with fractions," and "The euro." Each volume ends with a bibliography that includes Web sites and a cumulative index. The biographical entries include pronunciation guides for the names and at least one picture. They focus on childhood and education as much as on later accomplishments, which helps the young reader identify with the person. The entries for mathematical concepts include sidebars with glossary terms and definitions. Some of the definitions in the "Words to Know" are inaccurate or oversimplified. For instance, the definition of angle states "what is formed inside a triangle by two sides meeting at the vertex." Do angles not appear in any other shape? It would be more accurate to state they are formed by the meeting of any two lines. The word conversion is defined solely in terms of money. In mathematics, many other measurements are converted, such as inches to centimeters, grams to pounds, etc. Base has more mathematical significance than merely the multiplied number in an exponential expression. This term is even used with its other meaning in the definition of sexagesimal. Nevertheless, this is a wonderful set that will be very useful to middle-grade students and their teachers. Its price makes it affordable for most elementary, middle, and junior-high schools, and all public libraries should have it. Many high-school libraries will benefit from having it in their collections, too.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-10-Finding enough information on mathematicians can be problematic. This set goes a long way toward filling requests for material on the subject. Galileo, Isaac Newton, Ren‚ Descartes, and Pythagoras of Samos are here as is a host of lesser-known individuals such as Maria Agnesi, Nikolay Lobachevsky, and Srinivasa Ramanujan. Concepts such as "Pi" and "Prime number" are given extensive coverage. The writing is clear and accessible, and the biographies are often interesting. Every article includes a short list for further reading. Boxed sidebars and quotes are scattered throughout. Each volume opens with a useful table of contents, a list of "Entries by Mathematical Field" ("Logic," "Number theory," "Statistics," etc.), a chronology, and a glossary, and concludes with a "Selected Bibliography" (with Web sites) and a complete index. Illustrations are limited to black-and-white portraits of the mathematicians. While not as comprehensive as the Biographical Encyclopedia of Mathematicians, (Marshall Cavendish, 1999), this resource serves a slightly younger audience.-Jo-Anne Weinberg, Greenburgh Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This two-volume set is directed toward a secondary school audience. It is much more about the lives of 50 people who have done mathematics, or computer science, and much less about the work they did. It misses out altogether such important figures as David Hilbert. The set covers the early life, influences, and careers of mathematicians throughout history. There are about 35 articles that treat the concepts and principles that are appropriate to the time period, culture, and circumstances surrounding the work these people did. There are some 120 black-and-white illustrations, diagrams, charts, and maps. The language is appropriate for the intended audience and not postsecondary readers. Though these books may be useful additions to secondary school libraries or public libraries, they are not appropriate for academic libraries. D. Z. Spicer; University of Maryland