Cover image for Children's history of the 20th century.
Title:
Children's history of the 20th century.
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : DK Publishing, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
344 pages : illustrations (some color), portraits (some color) ; 30 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1220 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780789447227
Format :
Book

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CB426 .C5 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This lavishly illustrated, chronologically organized reference gives children an unparalleled overview of this most eventful of centuries. Features include sections on the US government, sports, music, movies, and theater, plus an introduction in which children give their thoughts on the century behind and the millennium ahead.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

As the end of the year approaches, several books offer a review of the century. Gr. 5^-9--Children's. Gr. 7^-10^-Jennings. Children's History, bountifully illustrated by period photos and color pictures of people, places, artifacts, and works of art, sweeps through the century with a year-by-year account of important events. The major stories are told as current news clippings, and though this gives a sense of immediacy, it also creates unlikely headlines such as "Popeye makes his debut." Libraries may have a nearly identical book on the shelves already. Although the title and cover are completely different, this book is clearly an update of DK's Junior Chronicle of the 20th Century (1997), which begins with the year 1900 and ends with 1996. The new edition adds some introductory pages of fluff and a few new pages of facts to take readers through 1998, raising the question of whether yet another retitled update will appear in the near future, covering all 100 years. Still, children researching or just browsing through the twentieth century will find plenty of interesting facts and photos here. Written from a clearly American point of view, The Century for Young People was adapted by Jennifer Armstrong from Jennings and Brewster's television series and book The Century. Interspersed with the book's cogently written story are many first-person narratives, which record the progress of political and social history by capturing the opinions and voices of people who lived through those times. Black-and-white photos, some home snapshots, some almost as famous as the people and events they portray, appear on nearly every page. Toward the end of the book color photos illustrate some scenes. Reading the book through gives a sense of the vast sweep of events, movements, and change through the last 100 years, as well as how those changes affected the lives of individuals. Young people will also find the book useful for research on periods in American history since 1901. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-A wonderful browsing book packed with photos. Short journalistic articles on double-page spreads cover a few important political and cultural events for each year up to 1998. Three bands along the bottom of the spreads representing "Innovations," "Entertainment," and "World Events" briefly note other milestones. The book ends with six two-page overviews of famous figures (movie stars, scientists and inventors, athletes, world leaders, music makers, and criminals). While it will be relatively useless to anyone researching a topic, this sleek coffee-table book will definitely entertain students curious about life during the century. The only real problem is that the index doesn't list all of the gems (Afros, 3-D movies, dried eggs) that give the book its real charm. Concluding spreads on "The US Government" and "Culture & Sports" just cover the basics. Certainly there are items missing from this entertaining cornucopia (there are no lists of the top movies, Oscar winners, or best-selling novels), but browsing it is a pleasant way to spend a couple of hours. It might also be useful for those American-history assignments on how people lived during the different decades.-Herman Sutter, Saint Agnes Academy, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

1990s The New Centuryp. 8
1910s War and Liberationp. 36
1920s The Roaring Twentiesp. 68
1930s Between the Warsp. 96
1940s The War Yearsp. 126
1950s Rebuilding the Worldp. 166
1960s The Swinging Sixtiesp. 190
1970s Scandal and Protestp. 220
1980s Falling Frontiersp. 250
1990s Network Ninetiesp. 280
Hollywood superstarsp. 312
Scientists and inventorsp. 314
Sports starsp. 316
World leadersp. 318
Music makersp. 320
Law-breakersp. 322
US government and structurep. 324
US sports and culturep. 326
Index and Acknowledgmentsp. 328