Cover image for Shakespeare's Globe
Title:
Shakespeare's Globe
Author:
Allison, Amy, 1956-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego : Lucent Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Discusses the history of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, including its construction, the plays that were performed there, its financial aspects, and the reconstruction in 1995.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 10.1 4.0 51629.
ISBN:
9781560065265
Format :
Book

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PR2920 .A56 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Explore the world where William Shakespeare's characters first came to life. At the Globe Theater, the drama behind the scenes rivaled that taking place on its stage. Truly, Shakespeare and his partners broke new ground when they built the Globe.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Allison concentrates on the Globe's architectural history and how the structural elements of this building influenced the structure of the plays written for it. In five short chapters, the tight and clearly written text takes readers from Burbage's original construction through its burning and rebuilding to its final demolition as Cromwell came to power. The building process is explained in careful detail, from the influences of classic Renaissance architecture to the markings used to define where specific timbers joined to the acoustical argument for an almost-round building. Contemporary history and personalities are woven into the story along with glimpses of audience behavior, admission prices, special effects, and backstage arrangements. An epilogue briefly recounts Sam Wanamaker's 1996 reconstruction. Black-and-white illustrations sparsely scattered throughout the text range from helpful diagrams, photographs, and reproductions to marginally enlightening small scenes. A handy time line, interesting sidebars (such as the growing use of tobacco), an extensive bibliography, and useful index help make this a valuable resource for Shakespeare buffs or budding architects. An engaging read, even for novices.-Sally Margolis, Barton Public Library, VT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.