Cover image for The lion's game : a novel
Title:
The lion's game : a novel
Author:
DeMille, Nelson.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Warner Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
677 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780446520652
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Detective John Corey, last seen in Plum Island, now faces his toughest assignment yet: the pursuit and capture of the world's most dangerous terrorist -- a young Arab known as "The Lion" who has baffled a federal task force and shows no sign of stopping in his quest for revenge against the American pilots who bombed Libya and killed his family. Filled with unrelenting suspense and surprising plot twists at every terrifying turn, THE LION'S GAME is a heartstopping race against time and one of Nelson DeMille's most riveting thrillers.


Author Notes

Nelson DeMille was born in New York City on August 23, 1943. He attended Hofstra University for three years, then joined the Army and went to Officer Candidate School. He was commissioned a First Lieutenant and served in Vietnam as an infantry platoon leader with the First Calvary Division. He received the Air Medal, Bronze Star, and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry while in the service. He eventually returned to Hofstra University and received a degree in political science and history.

His first writings were NYPD detective novels, but his first major novel, By the Rivers of Babylon, was published in 1978. His other works include Cathedral, The Talbot Odyssey, Word of Honor, The Gold Coast, The General's Daughter, Spencerville, Plum Island, The Lion's Game, Up Country, Night Fall, Wild Fire, and The Quest. His New York Times bestsellers include Radient Angel and The Cuban Affair.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Lifting a creepy detail from the Flying Dutchman legend--a ship manned by corpses--DeMille raises the curtain on a new John Corey mystery with a 747 landing itself at New York. Onboard, everyone is dead. The macabre scene alarms the NYPD's Corey even more because the deceased do not include a particular prisoner-passenger listed on the manifest, Asad Khalil, "defecting" Libyan terrorist. Since Corey's best-selling exploits in Plum Island (1997), he has joined an interagency team slated to take Khalil into custody. The perils of Khalil being at large are immediately impressed upon Corey and his new FBI love interest when they discover half their colleagues murdered. Switching to omniscient narration, DeMille flashes back to clarify Khalil's motivation: he seeks vengeance for the death of his family in the 1986 U.S. air strike against Libya, and he proceeds to wreak it with psychopathic efficiency. Suspense arises from Corey and company's pursuit of Khalil, a mission complicated by Corey's suspicions of the CIA contingent assigned to the case and by Corey's un-PC, antiauthoritarian sarcasm. Flouting orders at every opportunity, Corey gradually puts the pieces together to figure out what readers have long known: Khalil is systematically knocking off the pilots of the 1986 raid. The wild climax leaves the coast clear for a sequel, and why not? DeMille again puts daylight between himself and the competition in the international-thriller sweepstakes. --Gilbert Taylor


Publisher's Weekly Review

John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and star of DeMille's Plum Island, is back in this breezily narrated high-octane thriller about the hunt for a Libyan terrorist who has set his sights on some very specific targets--the Americans who bombed Libya on April 15, 1986. The novel begins with a tense airport scene--a transcontinental flight from Paris is flying into New York, and no one has been able to contact the pilot via radio. On the flight is Asad Khalil, a Libyan defector who will be met by Special Contract Agent Corey, his FBI "mentor" Kate Mayfield, and the rest of the Federal Anti-Terrorist Task Force. But when the plane lands, everyone on board is dead--except Khalil, who disappears after attacking the ATTF's airport headquarters. Has he left the country? Not if John Corey's right--and we know he is, thanks to gripping third-person chapters detailing Khalil's mission alternating with Corey's easy-going first-person narration. And by making Khalil, who lost most of his family in the 1986 bombing, as much of a protagonist as Corey, DeMille adds several shades of gray to what in less skillful hands might have been cartoonishly black and white. If anything, the reader ends up rooting for the bad guy, Khalil, with his mission of vengeance, is a more complex character than John Corey, who never drops his ex-cop bravado (thus trivializing a romance that moves from first date to proposal of marriage within the few days the plot covers). But as usual, DeMille artfully constructs a compulsively readable thriller around a troubling story line, slowly developing his villain from a faceless entity into a nation's all-too-human nemesis. Agent, Nick Ellison. 500,000 first printing; major ad/promo; BOMC main selection; 12-city author tour; Time-Warner audio. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Only 14 when American bombers killed his entire family in Libya, Asad Khalil has grown into a well-trained assassin and fakes a defection to get into the United States for his revenge. Pursued by several federal agents, he leaves a trail of death across the country. John Corey, of DeMille's Plum Island fame and our point-of-view character, wrestles with different bureaucracies while working to corral Khalil. Corey, the archetypal maverick cop, has one of the funniest tough-guy voices since Philip Marlowe, which, with the nonstop action, makes this tape a real treat. The abridgment is seamless, an accomplishment in a world where many abridgments sound like a reading of odd-numbered pages. Reader Boyd Gaines moves things along nicely, though he seems to run out of voices once or twice. He also interviews DeMille about research, writing techniques, and terrorism at the tape's end. This is quality work all around, and, given DeMille's popularity, easy to recommend.DJohn Hiett, Iowa City P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.