Cover image for Dive to the deep ocean : voyages of exploration and discovery
Title:
Dive to the deep ocean : voyages of exploration and discovery
Author:
Kovacs, Deborah.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Austin, Tex. : Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2000.
Physical Description:
64 pages : illustrations (mostly color), maps ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Relates the history of deep sea research, explaining how the development of submersibles, particularly the Alvin, has led to many fascinating discoveries.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.8 2.0 107370.
ISBN:
9780739812341
Format :
Book

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GC65 .K68 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Relates the history of deep sea research, explaining how the development of submersibles, particularly the Alvin, has led to many fascinating discoveries.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-9. Part of the Turnstone Ocean Explorer series, this is a brief, illustrated overview of the technology for investigating the ocean floor. Kovacs begins with the early submersibles that carried scientists to the bottom of the ocean, and she then discusses the complicated engineering of the recent deep-diving robots that collect samples and information. Drawing on the work of the famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, she focuses on particular research machines: the scientists who invented them, how they work, and what they have discovered (including the Titanic). The writing doesn't have the excitement of Sylvia Earle's Dive [BKL F 15 99], and the decorative type in the detailed captions and boxed insets is not easy to read; but the overall design is like a browsable magazine, with big, colorful diagrams and dramatic photos of the machines on the ocean frontier. A glossary and a brief bibliography are appended. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-A lively look at the technological development of submersible vessels and some of the discoveries associated with them. Maps, full-color and black-and-white photos, and/or drawings appear on every page and amplify the narrative. A double-page diagram compares the heights of familiar land mountains with undersea mounts. A basic difficulty of exploring the deep-sea environment is the issue of water pressure, and this is deftly explained in a text box entitled "The Weight of Water." Kovacs includes scientists' imaginings and how they build the tools to match their dreams. The accounts of the fears, problems, and setbacks encountered before solutions and success were achieved are particularly interesting. Such milestone events as the discovery of hydrothermal vents and the Titanic are described to demonstrate the use of deep-sea submersibles for research. The spheres used in the first Alvin are shown in a series of black-and-white photographs while the narrative describes the arduous 1964 testing process. Color photographs with detailed labels invite readers to explore Alvin and Jason. Sonar pictures using 1990s technology provide images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that appear in three dimensions, which readers are asked to compare with the photographs obtained in the 1970s. Good homework support and great reading for those interested in ocean work.-Frances E. Millhouser, Chantilly Regional Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.