Cover image for Jupiter
Title:
Jupiter
Author:
Landau, Elaine.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Franklin Watts, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
63 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
Summary:
Describes the characteristics of the planet Jupiter and its moons, as revealed by photographs sent back by unmanned spaceships.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.1 1.0 46785.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 9 3 Quiz: 19974 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780531203873

9780531164266
Format :
Book

Available:*

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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB661 .L36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Space exploration is no longer new, but new discoveries are being made every day. This series explores those discoveries, revealing the latest scientific observations about our solar system, exploding myths using newfound data, chronicling the journeys of space pioneers, and detailing the methods scientists and astronomers use to map planets where no human has been before. As our knowledge of the universe expands with astronomical speed, Space provides a timely introduction to a popular intermediate-grade subject.


Summary

Describes the characteristics of the planet Jupiter and its moons, as revealed by photographs sent back by unmanned spaceships.


Author Notes

Elaine Landau Elaine Landau has received her Bachelor's in English and Journalism and her Master's in Library and Information Sciences. She has written over 185 books, most of them non-fiction children's books on subjects such as earth science, planets, the supernatural, dinosaurs, ancient civilizations, ecology and contemporary issues.

Landau's books have won the American Association for the Advancement of Science: "Science Books and Film" Best Children's Science Booklist, as well as The New York Public Library Books for the Teenage, the New Jersey Institute of Technology Award and VOYA's Nonfiction Honor List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Elaine Landau Elaine Landau has received her Bachelor's in English and Journalism and her Master's in Library and Information Sciences. She has written over 185 books, most of them non-fiction children's books on subjects such as earth science, planets, the supernatural, dinosaurs, ancient civilizations, ecology and contemporary issues.

Landau's books have won the American Association for the Advancement of Science: "Science Books and Film" Best Children's Science Booklist, as well as The New York Public Library Books for the Teenage, the New Jersey Institute of Technology Award and VOYA's Nonfiction Honor List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-- These introductions to planets are filled with full-color photographs, paintings, and colorful chapter heads, but contain no tables or useful diagrams. Landau's texts fill only a third of the respective titles, but still manage to combine unnecessary wordiness with scientific inaccuracy. She defines ``equator'' in such a way that could mean any great circle; confuses the relation between size, mass, and density; speaks of the Viking landers settling on ``somewhat smooth turf'' on Mars; consistently claims the Galilean moons are the four nearest Jupiter; and supplies misleading background to the discovery of Neptune. These volumes seem intended to replace Vogt's Mars and the Inner Planets and Nourse's The Giant Planets (both Watts, 1982). They represent a major shift in the series to reach younger audiences; but rather than updating information, they too often omit it instead. They are more comparable to David Hughes's ``Planetary Exploration Series'' (Facts on File), which contain their own share of errors, illustrated with flamboyant paintings. For scientific accuracy, one is generally safest with volumes from Isaac Asimov's ``Library of the Universe'' (Gareth Stevens) in spite of their lack of straightforward organization. Or one can turn to the photo essays of Seymour Simon: Jupiter (1985) and Mars (1987 both Morrow) for inspiration and get the facts and figures from encyclopedias and almanacs. --Margaret Chatham, formerly at Smithtown Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-- These introductions to planets are filled with full-color photographs, paintings, and colorful chapter heads, but contain no tables or useful diagrams. Landau's texts fill only a third of the respective titles, but still manage to combine unnecessary wordiness with scientific inaccuracy. She defines ``equator'' in such a way that could mean any great circle; confuses the relation between size, mass, and density; speaks of the Viking landers settling on ``somewhat smooth turf'' on Mars; consistently claims the Galilean moons are the four nearest Jupiter; and supplies misleading background to the discovery of Neptune. These volumes seem intended to replace Vogt's Mars and the Inner Planets and Nourse's The Giant Planets (both Watts, 1982). They represent a major shift in the series to reach younger audiences; but rather than updating information, they too often omit it instead. They are more comparable to David Hughes's ``Planetary Exploration Series'' (Facts on File), which contain their own share of errors, illustrated with flamboyant paintings. For scientific accuracy, one is generally safest with volumes from Isaac Asimov's ``Library of the Universe'' (Gareth Stevens) in spite of their lack of straightforward organization. Or one can turn to the photo essays of Seymour Simon: Jupiter (1985) and Mars (1987 both Morrow) for inspiration and get the facts and figures from encyclopedias and almanacs. --Margaret Chatham, formerly at Smithtown Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

1 A Trip to Jupiter: Which way would you point your spaceship?p. 7
2 Jupiter in the Solar System: What kind of moves does this planet have?p. 11
3 What's It Like on Jupiter?: Would Jupiter remind you of home?p. 19
How Big Is Jupiter?: And how teeny is Earth?p. 24
4 A Stormy Planet: Just how long can one storm last?p. 27
5 Rings and Many Moons: How is a planet like a whole solar systemp. 32
6 Missions to the King of the Planets: Has anything entered Jupiter's dangerous atmosphere?p. 39
True Statisticsp. 43
Resourcesp. 44
Important Wordsp. 46
Indexp. 47
About the Authorp. 48
1 A Trip to Jupiter: Which way would you point your spaceship?p. 7
2 Jupiter in the Solar System: What kind of moves does this planet have?p. 11
3 What's It Like on Jupiter?: Would Jupiter remind you of home?p. 19
How Big Is Jupiter?: And how teeny is Earth?p. 24
4 A Stormy Planet: Just how long can one storm last?p. 27
5 Rings and Many Moons: How is a planet like a whole solar systemp. 32
6 Missions to the King of the Planets: Has anything entered Jupiter's dangerous atmosphere?p. 39
True Statisticsp. 43
Resourcesp. 44
Important Wordsp. 46
Indexp. 47
About the Authorp. 48