Cover image for XML for real programmers
Title:
XML for real programmers
Author:
Hoque, Reaz.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Morgan Kaufmann, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xv, 462 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm + 1 computer optical disc (4 3/4 in.)
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780123555922
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Are you looking for a serious, intensely technical book on XML? XML for Real Programmers provides detailed instruction in the all techniques you need to master to build XML applications for any Web enterprise. Inside, the author begins with incisive introductions to the entire family of XML technologies. Then, building on this foundation, he guides you step by step through the development of three sample applications that together form a complete, cohesive e-commerce site: A reusable XML framework, adaptable to a wide variety of document factory Web applications and complemented by key business objects: an Account class, a Catalog class, and a ShoppingBasket class. A Java-based servlet responsible for all aspects of XSL transformation, including external stylesheets, conditional processing, flow-control, dynamically created attribute nodes for parent elements, and template invocation. An order processing application designed to accept and process data structured by a wide range of DTDs. Features: * Offers in-depth coverage of the essential members of the XML family-DOM, XSL, Xlink and Xpointer-including specification-level analysis and explanation. * Teaches by example, developin


Table of Contents

Dedicationp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Chapter 1 The Core of XMLp. 1
1.1 Introduction to XMLp. 1
1.2 Documentsp. 4
1.3 Physical Structuresp. 16
1.4 Tools for XMLp. 21
1.5 Conclusionp. 26
Chapter 2 DOM and XSLp. 27
2.1 Introductionp. 27
2.2 The Document Object Modelp. 27
2.3 Document Object Model (Core) Level 1p. 29
2.4 Extensible Style Language--XSLp. 57
2.5 Conclusionp. 65
Chapter 3 XLInk and XPointerp. 67
3.1 XLink: The XML Linking Languagep. 68
3.2 XPointer: The XML Pointing Languagep. 84
3.3 XLink Extended Linksp. 98
3.4 Conclusionp. 111
Chapter 4 Web Applications with XMLp. 113
4.1 XML in Actionp. 114
4.2 Anatomy of a Web Application with XMLp. 117
4.3 Interoperable Web Applicationsp. 135
4.4 E-commerce Applicationsp. 144
4.5 Conclusionp. 163
Chapter 5 Using the Document Object Modelp. 165
5.1 Your mission, if you choose to acceptp. 165
5.2 Technology Requirementsp. 167
5.3 Application Overviewp. 169
5.4 W3C Level 1 Document Object Model (DOM) Recommendationp. 171
5.5 PDA Database Overviewp. 196
5.6 Business Objectsp. 198
5.7 Conclusionp. 236
Chapter 6 Building An XML Websitep. 237
6.1 Java Servlet Specificationp. 239
6.2 XML Servlet Considerationsp. 242
6.3 Implementing the User Interface with XSL Stylesheetsp. 286
6.4 Challengep. 312
6.5 Conclusionp. 312
Chapter 7 Integrating with the Distributorp. 315
7.1 Introductionp. 315
7.2 Extending the Websitep. 345
7.3 Conclusionp. 377
Chapter 8 XML Related Technologiesp. 379
8.1 Namespaces in XMLp. 379
8.2 Resource Description Framework (RDF)p. 390
8.3 Document Content Description (DCD)p. 403
8.4 Channel Definition Format (CDF) and Channelsp. 416
8.5 SAX: The Simple API for XMLp. 429
8.6 The Future of XMLp. 440
8.7 Conclusionp. 442
Indexp. 443
About the Authorp. 459
About the Contributing Authorsp. 461