Cover image for The world that trade created : society, culture, and the world economy, 1400-the present
Title:
The world that trade created : society, culture, and the world economy, 1400-the present
Author:
Pomeranz, Kenneth.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xvii, 256 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780765602497

9780765602503
Format :
Book

Available:*

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HF352 .P58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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HF352 .P58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

In more than 75 brief vignettes, authors Pomeranz and Topik offer unique and entertaining historical perspectives on the world economy, showing that much of 20th century "globalization" goes back centuries.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Pomeranz and Topik (both of the Univ. of California, Irvine and accomplished specialists in Chinese and Latin American history) present an innovative approach to world economic history. Their study, consisting of about 70 short essays grouped with problem-posing introductions into seven topical chapters, examines a rich intercontinental tableau that includes Aztec traders and European trading companies, Chinese overseas merchants and Peruvian silver miners, and plantation slaves and peanut farmers, among many others. The actors and the markets of international trade come to life, and the authors ably demonstrate the importance of social factors in trade and the changing cultural content of different goods. On the whole, this well-written work is quite successful. Moreover, the original and provocative analysis of early China and its subsequent relations with Britain during the Industrial Revolution is worthy of serious scholarly consideration, which it will receive when presented in a monographic format. Conversely, this reviewer found the stress on colonial agricultural products and the consistently deleterious consequences of relations with Europeans somewhat repetitious and exaggerated. This lively introduction will appeal to both undergraduates and general readers. Useful bibliography. Recommended for public and academic library collections. J. P. McKay; Univ of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign