Cover image for Secret honor
Title:
Secret honor
Author:
Griffin, W. E. B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1999.
Physical Description:
497 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399145681
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

With World War II in full swing, a German general conspires to kill Hitler while his son living in Buenos Aires falls under SS suspicion.


Author Notes

W. E. B. Griffin is one of eight pseudonyms used by William E. Butterworth III, who was born on November 10, 1929 in Newark, New Jersey.

He enlisted in the U.S. Army as a private in 1946 and underwent counterintelligence training at Fort Holabird. After assignment to the Army of Occupation in Germany where he served on the staff of the Commander of the U.S. Constabulary, Major General I.D. White, Butterworth left the service in 1947, but rejoined and again served with White from 1951 to 1953 in Korea. After leaving the service for the second time, Butterworth remained in Korea as a combat correspondent. He was later appointed chief of the publications division of the Signal Aviation Test and Support Activity at the Army Aviation Center in Fort Rucker, Alabama. He received the Brigadier General Robert L. Dening Memorial Distinguished Service Award of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association in 1991 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars News Media Award in 1999.

At first, he wrote fiction for young adults. He has written more than 125 books including the Brotherhood of War series, The Corps series, Badge of Honor series, Honor Bound series, Presidential Agent series, Men at War series, and A Clandestine Operations Novel series. He received the Alabama Author's Award in 1982 from the Alabama Library Association.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Griffin's twenty-ninth novel, the third in his Honor Bound series, is a story of espionage during World War II. It concerns a German general who realizes that his country is losing the war, Hitler and his cohorts are evil, and the Allies will demand a terrible retribution upon their victory. He seeks to hasten the end of the war by the only possible means available--assassinating the Nazi leader. He warns his son, an officer stationed in Buenos Aires, not to return to Germany until the war is over. The general's son is suspected by the SS after a Nazi operation goes awry. Add to the mix one Cletus Frade, an OSS agent accused of disobeying orders and threatened with being returned to the U.S. and admitted to a mental hospital. Descriptions of the war's battles and its leaders, its aircraft and ships, are notable for their accuracy, which Griffin is known for. The dialogue is a bit stereotyped--the word jawohl appears on just about every other page--but the plot moves at a brisk pace, which his fans appreciate. This Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection will undoubtedly reach the best-seller lists, for the author once again proves himself a compelling storyteller. --George Cohen


Publisher's Weekly Review

This third entry in the military/espionage Honor Bound series, focusing on the Argentine-German connection during WWII, will intrigue newcomers and have Griffin's long-time fans queuing up for the next installment. In 1943, the Nazi-ordered assassination of Jorge Frade, the anti-Axis president of Argentina, has left the country in a tense mood, which is exacerbated by the murder of two Nazi officers during a night beach landing, part of the top-secret Nazi Operation Phoenix. The aborted mission was crucial to a plan to free the Argentine-interned crew of the Nazi ship Graf Spee, but it turns out that the slain officers had also extorted ransom money from Jews in concentration camps and arranged for their passage to Argentina--without the Reich's knowledge. Cletus Frade, the 24-year-old American-reared son of the slain president, has returned to Argentina as heir to his father's vast estates and financial holdings. But Cletus is also an OSS (CIA precursor) agent, and a chance meeting with Major Hans-Peter von Wachstein, a Nazi pilot attached to the German embassy, results in their friendship. Peter feeds secrets to Cletus in exchange for help in moving Peter's family's funds to Argentina, where they hope to live after the war that he and his father (a close aide to the Fuhrer) believe is wrong and already lost. When Himmler launches an investigation to find the embassy spy who scuttled Operation Phoenix, Cletus struggles to protect Peter's identity and deal with the rising power of pro-Axis Juan Peron. Griffin adroitly shifts among German, American and Argentinian cultural milieux and fills the plot with believable romance, intrigue and diplomatic fencing, while capturing the horrors of war and the crucial role of intelligence agents. He nicely explains the Reich's need for Argentina as safe harbor to replenish its U-boats and to stash funds for postwar Nazi emigration. What will happen to the SS, Cletus and the surviving cast promises an equally exciting sequel. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Continuing the saga he began in Honor Bound, Griffin follows the cloak-and-dagger environment of World War II espionage. To be specific, we look at the lives of Marine aviator and Argentine citizen Cletus Frade and German air ace and military attach‚ to Buenos Aires Major Hans-Peter Freiherr von Wachtstein, both OSS agents. The action, which takes place mostly in Argentina, also involves many historical characters including Heinrich Himmler, "Wild Bill" Donovan, Claus von Stauffenberg, and Col. Juan Peron. Griffin is a master at weaving fact and fiction, and this work will not disappoint. Veteran actor Stephen Lang does an admirable job reading the text; more adroit with the narrative than some portions of dialog, he will nonetheless keep listeners on the edge of their seats. For public libraries.ÄMichael T. Fein, Central Virginia Community Coll., Lynchburg (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.